Sep 15

Police now using the Zika hoax to entrap public for drug possession:

Law enforcement authorities in Michigan have found a more creative way to crack down on the use of illegal substances. The Bath Township Police Department published a posting on Facebook on September 6 stating that as a result of online reports about methamphetamine possibly being contaminated with the Zika virus, they are offering free testing services, and will even come to your door.

The post reads, “Breaking News. We have read reports online about meth possibly containing the Zika virus! We DO NOT want this to happen to you. If you recently bought some meth, you can bring it into the Bath Township Police Department and we can test it for you. Your safety is our #1 priority! Please SHARE so everyone knows.”

Another police department in Salley, South Carolina, is seemingly also using Zika as a means to bust drug addicts. The Salley Police Department issued a warning to this effect on its Facebook page on March 24.

Police departments are offering free testing of methamphetamine for the Zika virus

The police department post warns the public that recently purchased meth in the Wagener, Perry or Windsor areas may be contaminated with the Zika virus. “Please bring your meth to the Salley Police Department for testing. We also make house calls. Thank you for your participation!!”

Admitting the post was comedic, the Bath Township Police Department said that it takes the health and safety of its citizens “very seriously,” adding that their primary goal is to help those suffering from addiction.

At the time of this writing, the Bath Township Police Department post had 2,800 shares, hundreds of comments and nearly 1,000 Facebook Likes.

CDC says most people who contract Zika have little to no symptoms

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states on its website that most people who contract Zika do not have any symptoms, and when they do, these are typically mild and include things like joint and muscle pain, headaches and fever.

“People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika,” the CDC says. “Once a person has been infected with Zika, they are likely to be protected from future infections.”

The agency says that the only people affected by the virus are pregnant women, and claim that Zika causes a birth defect known as microcephaly, resulting in decreased head circumference.

However, because the predicted outbreak of microcephaly did not occur in Brazil, where cases of the virus are concentrated, health authorities in that nation are beginning to question whether another cause might be responsible.

Brazilian doctors suspect something other than Zika may be causing birth defects

“We suspect that something more than Zika virus is causing the high intensity and severity of cases,” Fatima Marinho, director of information and health analysis at Brazil’s Health Ministry, told the journal Nature.

Zika infections have continued to rise, but birth defects have not. A new and more expansive study has also found that Zika and microcephaly aren’t as closely correlated as was previously believed.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine observed nearly 12,000 pregnant women in Colombia infected with Zika. None of them gave birth to a baby with microcephaly.

“Four cases of microcephaly were reported with women who didn’t have Zika symptoms and were not part of the study, which is consistent with the normal expected number of cases,” Life News reports.

“Based on estimated numbers there should be about 60,000 pregnant women in Colombia with the Zika virus, yet there are hardly any cases of microcephaly. If the link to Zika is legitimate, there should have been a dramatic increase in the number of babies with microcephaly.”

Sources:

WREG.com

Facebook.com

Facebook.com

CDC.gov

Nature.com

LifeNews.com

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