Canada Rejects Stronger Export Rules For Genetically Modified Organisms

“Because Canada’s labeling law do not require disclosure of genetically modified content, Canadian consumers in fact have been using and eating genetically modified food for about 10 years, mostly corn, soya and canola.”


Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz hailed the defeat of the bill because GMO provides an innovative technology that allows Canadian farmers to be competitive in the world market.


Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz

Canadian MPs voted Wednesday evening to reject stronger export rules for crops of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

Legislators crossed party lines and cast 178 votes in favor of quashing the bill; 98 MPs were in favor of more stringent export regulations for GMO crops.

With the Parliament’s decision, exports of genetically modified crops by Canadian farmers would continue to be approved based on safety for human consumption and environmental release.

The MPs voted to exclude as criteria potential harm to export markets and economic harm to farmers if buyers are not in favor of genetically engineered harvest.

Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz hailed the defeat of the bill because GMOs provides an innovative technology that allows Canadian farmers to be competitive in the world market.

While there has been lesser resistance to GMO crops, the National Farmers Union – which is against GMO foods – pointed out that Canadian farmers’ largest market potential is in Europe, which is basically in opposition to the importation and consumption of genetically engineered foods.

Because Canada’s labeling law do not require disclosure of genetically modified content, Canadian consumers in fact have been using and eating genetically modified food for about 10 years, mostly corn, soya and canola.

Vittorio Hernandez
February 11, 2011 05:30 am EST

Source: All Headline News

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