Nov 01

Adya Clarity caught deceiving Health Canada in licensing scam that hid aluminum content (Natural News, Oct. 31, 2011):

NaturalNews can now report that Adya, Inc. has been caught not only misrepresenting the composition of its product on its own label, but has now been caught committing marketing fraud that violates its terms of licensing with Health Canada. Health Canada is already investigating the issue.

In response to NaturalNews articles questioning the safety of Adya Clarity, the president of Adya, Inc., Matt Bakos, touted his product’s “NPN number” from Health Canada as proof that the product has been approved as safe for internal consumption.

NaturalNews investigated this claim.

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Nov 01

Adya Clarity’s top distributor issues full apology, product recall (Natural News, Oct. 31, 2011):

Following days of shocking disclosures about the misleading labeling, fraudulent marketing and profiteering of a product called Adya Clarity, the product’s top distributor in North America, Raw Food World (Matt Monarch), has stepped forward to issue a full apology and a complete product recall.

Adya Clarity is a product made from inorganic minerals mined near Fukushima, Japan, then dissolved into sulfuric acid and bottled in the United States for sale as a dietary supplement promising to remove heavy metals from your brain, eliminate kidney stones, treat rheumatoid arthritis and many other health conditions, none of which were backed by clinical evidence (…). The aluminum content of the product had been intentionally hidden by the importer and manufacturer, Adya, Inc., which had also deceived Health Canada to acquire an NPN license as an “iron supplement” — a license which it proceeded to grossly violate (…).

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Oct 28

NaturalNews issues consumer alert about Adya Clarity, imported as battery acid and sold for internal consumption (NaturalNews, Oct. 28, 2011):

A product called Adya Clarity has been sweeping across the natural health community in the last year or so. It has been sold with recommendations for internal use — taking “super shots” — and often accompanied by wide-ranging claims that it treats cancer, kidney stones, hormone regulation, arthritis, and that it removes radiation and heavy metals.

Because so many readers have been asking me about Adya Clarity, I decided to look further into the issue. I was aided by some timely tips that came my way which I began to check out as an investigative journalist. What I found — much of which is detailed in this report — absolutely shocked me. But what do YOU think? Read my report and decide for yourself.

Unsubstantiated health claims

The claims that Adya Clarity is good for treating kidney stones, hair loss, arthritis and even cancer are, I discovered, entirely unsubstantiated for this product. There is simply no reliable clinical evidence supporting Adya Clarity to be safe or effective for any health condition whatsoever. Furthermore, there are many facets of this story that have raised red flags in my mind as the editor of NaturalNews.

For starters, Adya Clarity is primarily composed of sulfuric acid, iron sulfate and aluminum sulfate. Before being diluted and bottled, Adya Clarity starts out as Themarox, a mineral deposit mined in Japan just a few dozen miles away from Fukushima. This Themarox has a very acid pH value, near 0.5. In this state, aluminum sulfate is present in a concentration of 10.9 grams per liter, according to our research.

To make Adya Clarity, Themarox is diluted at roughly 10:1, raising the pH and diluting the sulfuric acid. Once bottled, Adya Clarity contains the following concentrations of metals and minerals, according to its label:

Iron: 2,000 PPM
Magnesium: 400 PPM
Calcium: 250 PPM
Potassium: 200 PPM
Manganese: 20 PPM
… and so on.

Do you see what’s missing from this list? The aluminum sulfate. By my calculations, given that the aluminum sulfate starts out at 10.9 grams per liter, the diluted form of Themarox — Adya Clarity — contains roughly 1.2 grams per liter of aluminum sulfate. This is 1200 mg per liter, which is almost exactly 1200 PPM (parts per million). (Source: The MSDS provided to me by Adya, Inc. as a Word document, see below. This also corresponds to the PPM of aluminum claimed by the manufacturer, Shimanishi Kaken Co.,Ltd.)

Curious as to why aluminum sulfate was not listed on the label in the appropriate order of concentrate (under Iron and above Magnesium), I contacted Matt Bakos, the owner and importer of Adya Clarity and asked him this question. The reason he didn’t list aluminum concentration on the label underneath iron, he told me, was because “I don’t want to.” He said it was listed as a “trace mineral” and that was sufficient. There was no need to list the 1200 PPM of aluminum in Adya because it “is not required,” he told me.

I bet many of the people who paid $100+ per bottle for Adya Clarity would also be interested to learn there’s quite a significant concentration of aluminum in the product they may have already begun ingesting.

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