Feb 24

- 59% of the ‘Tuna’ Americans Eat Is Not Tuna (The Atlantic, Feb 22, 2013):

Nonprofit ocean protection group Oceana took 1,215 samples of fish from across the United States and genetically tested them in order to bring us the following astonishing facts:

  • 59% of the fish labeled “tuna” sold at restaurants and grocery stores in the US is not tuna.
  • Sushi restaurants were far more likely to mislabel their fish than grocery stores or other restaurants.
What’s for dinner at your local sushi joint? Pretty much anything but what’s on the menu.
  • In Chicago, Austin, New York, and Washington DC, every single sushi restaurant sampled sold mislabeled tuna.
  • 84% of fish samples labeled “white tuna” were actually escolar, a fish that can cause prolonged, uncontrollable, oily anal leakage.
  • The only fish more likely to be misrepresented than tuna was snapper, which was mislabeled 87% of the time, and was in actuality any of six different species.

If you’ve ever wondered why the sushi in the display case is so affordable, given the dire state of the world’s tuna supply, well, now you know.

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Jan 07


President of sushi restaurant chain Sushi-Zanmai, Kiyoshi Kimura, displays a 222kg bluefin tuna at his main restaurant near Tokyo’s Tsukiji fish market on January 5, 2013 (AFP Photo / Yoshikazu Tsuno)

- Big Fish: Tuna sells for record $1.8 million at Tokyo auction (RT, Jan 6, 2013):

It’s the most expensive fish in the world, and you’ll have to hurry to grab a bite of it: A huge bluefin tuna was sold for a record sum of nearly $1.8 million at a Tokyo fish market’s first auction of the year.

The enormous 221-kilogram fish was auctioned off at Tokyo’s Tsukiji fish market, setting a new price record – nearly three times the one set last year. The tuna was caught off the coast of northeastern Japan, according to market official Ryoji Yagi.

The meat of the world’s most expensive fish will be used for sushi and sashimi, soon to be served in one of Tokyo’s restaurant chains.

Continue reading »

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Sep 09

- Greenpeace detected cesium from Sushi sold beside Shinagawa station in Tokyo (Fukushima Diary, Sep 9, 2012):

Eating Sushi is becoming like Russian roulette.

Greenpeace measured 10.9 Bq/Kg of cesium from Sushi in Tokyo. The amount of strontium is not known.

On 9/7/2012, Greenpeace published their measurement result. They conducted a spot check of sushi at 10 shops of Tokyo, Kanagawa and Saitama. The targets were 5 major sushi chain stores. (7/20 ~ 8/16/2012) They took 4 samples from each sushi chain store.

They measured 4.1±0.5 Bq/Kg of Cs-134, 6.8±0.7 Bq/Kg of Cs-137 from one of the 20 samples purchased at “Kura zushi. The branch is in front of Shinagawa station of Tokyo. The ingredient was Japanese sardine.

They didn’t measure cesium from the rest of 19 samples, but the detectable amount was 5 Bq/Kg. Continue reading »

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Jan 28

From the article:

Chef Daniel Boulud “believes that Japanese ingredients are safe

And obviously there is a big difference between believing and KNOWING.

- Over 30% Of Tested Fukushima Children Have Thyroid Lumps

Tepco: Fukushima Releases 70 MILLION BEQUERELS PER HOUR, Up 12 Million Bq From December

- Prof. Dr. Chris Busby: ‘You Shouldn’t Go On A Business Trip To Japan’ – ‘Get Out Of Japan’ – ‘Run!’ – ‘I Would Get Out Of Tokyo’ (Video)

Prof. Hayakawa of Gunma University:

‘If you don’t educate yourself now and fast, you’ll die.’


- NY Chefs Learn about Japanese Cuisine, and CM by the Japanese Government Promoting Food in East Japan (EX-SKF, Jan. 27, 2012):

This gotta be the scheme hatched by the Japanese government, to have a sympathetic French chef conduct a workshop in New York.

The Japanese people, like many Asians and for that matter Europeans (and New Yorkers themselves), seem to think everything revolves around New York when it comes to anything American.

Of all things, the workshop was about how to prepare raw fish for sushi…

Anyway, here’s NHK World (1/27/2012):

NY chefs learn about Japanese cuisine

Chefs at high-end restaurants in New York have taken part in a workshop to learn about traditional Japanese cuisine.

New York-based French chef Daniel Boulud organized the workshop. He led a group of chefs last July to cook meals for survivors in the tsunami-ravaged city of Kamaishi.

About 40 chefs took part in Thursday’s workshop.

A sushi chef explained traditional ways to prepare raw fish.

Boulud said Japan is striving to restore trust in food safety, and he believes that Japanese ingredients are safe.

Continue reading »

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