May 26

- Quebec Steps Closer to Martial Law to Repress Students: Bill 78 is a “Declaration of War on the Student Movement” (Intel Hub, May 19, 2012):

On Friday, May 18, the Québec legislature signed a special “emergency law” to “restore order” in the province following three months of student protests in a strike against the government’s proposed 80% increase in the cost of tuition. A legislative debate lasted all night and resulted in a vote of 68-48 in favour of the legislation.

The legislation has three main focal points: (1) it “suspends” the school semester for schools majorly affected by the strike, (2) it establishes extremely high fines for anyone who attempts to picket or block access to schools, and (3) it imposes massive restrictions on where and how people may demonstrate and protest in the streets.
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May 23

- These Are The Colleges That Will Be Screwed When The Student Loan Bubble Pops (Business Insider, May 21, 2012):

We know the model is not sustainable,” said Lawrence T. Lesick, vice president for enrollment management at Ohio Northern University. “Schools are going to have to show the value proposition. Those that don’t aren’t going to be around.”

(The New York Times; May 14, 2012)

Very few topics have received as much attention here at Sense on Cents as the student loan/debt bubble.

In my opinion, the size, scope, and impact of this problem is an enormous anchor weighing down our next generation and our nation’s economy.

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May 21

- The Commencement Address That Won’t Be Given (Robert Reich, May 18, 2012):

Members of the Class of 2012,

As a former secretary of labor and current professor, I feel I owe it to you to tell you the truth about the pieces of parchment you’re picking up today.

You’re f*cked.

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May 21

- Half of Florida high school students fail reading test (Reuters, May 18, 2012):

MIAMI – Nearly half of Florida high school students failed the reading portion of the state’s new toughened standardized test, education officials said on Friday.

Results this year from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test showed 52 percent of freshman students and 50 percent of sophomores scored at their grade levels.

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May 18

- Student Loan Debt Collector Gets Paid $454,000 In Taxpayer Money (Huffington Post, May 17, 2012):

Debt collectors may have a worse reputation in the eyes of the public than members of Congress, ambulance-chasing lawyers and even sleazy tabloid journalists. And some recent headlines won’t improve their standing anytime soon.

The earnings of some student-loan debt collectors raised eyebrows when it was revealed this week that some of them make over $450,000, more than twice the pay of the U.S. Secretary of Education. Seven employees at Educational Credit Management, a Minnesota nonprofit group that works with the government to collect on loans in default, earned more than $400,000 through commissions up to 31 percent, reports Bloomberg News. ECM, whose CEO Richard Boyle earned $1.1 million in 2010, is one of 32 groups that oversee student loans for the government.

One of the debtors contacted by ECM is Susan Raposa, a special-education teacher in Massachusetts, who is struggling to pay off her $47,000 student loan balance. “I absolutely want to pay my fair share,” Raposa tells Bloomberg News. “But I’m going to live poorer than people on welfare.”

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Apr 24

- Think The US Student Loan Bubble Is Bad? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet (ZeroHedge, April 23, 2012)

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Mar 29

Let’s see what those brilliant students will think about their actions, when their little brothers and sisters will start to die like flies from heart disease, cancer etc.


- Disaster Debris Wide-Area Disposal: Tokyo Univ. Students to the Rescue with the Help from Largest Ad Agency in Japan (EX-SKF, March 28, 2012):

Students at the prestigious (at least hard to get in) Tokyo University have formed a group called “Project to Think About 3.11 Debris”. The group held a public symposium on March 28 on the Tokyo University Komaba campus, co-sponsored by Jiji Tsushin and others with “special support” from the Ministry of the Environment.

Their message: More information disclosure from the national government should help; there is a “silent majority” who would gladly accept disaster debris.

From the event co-sponsor Jiji Tsushin (3/28/2012):

不安解消へ情報開示を=東大生ら、がれき処理で提言

Tokyo University students make proposals on disaster debris processing – information disclosure to dispel fears

東 日本大震災で発生したがれき処理の問題を東京大の学生らが議論する「3・11のガレキを考えるプロジェクト」(共催・時事通信社など、特別協力・環境省) は28日、放射能汚染に対する国民の不安を解消するため政府に一層の情報開示などを求める提言をまとめた。近く環境省に提出する。

“The Project to Think about 3.11 Debris”, where Tokyo University students discuss the issue of disaster debris from the March 11, 2011 earthquake/tsunami, issued its proposals to the national government to further disclose information to dispel citizens’ fears of radiation contamination. The Project is co-sponsored by Jiji Tsushin and others, with the special support from the Ministry of the Environment. The proposals will be submitted to the Ministry of the Environment shortly.

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Mar 24

- Student-Loan Debt Tops $1 Trillion (Wall Street Journal, March 22, 2012):

The amount Americans owe on student loans is far higher than earlier estimates and could lead some consumers to postpone buying homes, potentially slowing the housing recovery, U.S. officials said Wednesday.

Total student debt outstanding appears to have surpassed $1 trillion late last year, said officials at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a federal agency created in the wake of the financial crisis. That would be roughly 16% higher than an estimate earlier this year by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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Jan 17


YouTube Added: 16.01.2012

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Nov 29


YouTube


YouTube

- Iranian Students Storm, Ransack British Embassy in Tehran (The Blaze/AP, Nov. 29, 2011):

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Hard-line Iranian students stormed the British diplomatic compounds in Tehran on Tuesday, bringing down the Union Jack flag and throwing documents from windows in scenes reminiscent of the anger against Western powers after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

The mob surged past riot police into the British Embassy compound – which they pelted with petrol bombs and stones – two days after Iran‘s parliament approved a bill that reduces diplomatic relations with Britain following London’s support of recently upgraded Western sanctions on Tehran over its disputed nuclear program.

Less than two hours later, police appeared to regain control of the site. But the official IRNA news agency said about 300 protesters entered the British ambassador’s residence in another part of the city and replaced British flags with Iranian ones. The British Foreign Office harshly denounced the melee and said Iran has a “clear duty” under international law to protect diplomats and offices.

“We are outraged by this,” said the statement. “It is utterly unacceptable and we condemn it.”

It said a “significant number” of protesters entered the compound and caused vandalism, but gave no other details on damage or whether diplomatic staff was inside the embassy, although the storming occurred after business hours.
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Oct 21

See also:

- The Fraud At The Heart Of The Student Loan Market Exposed – To Many, This Market Has Become The Biggest Credit Bubble In America:

“To be sure, when the implications of the $850+ billion student loan bubble blowing up spread through the financial markets, it will make subprime seem like a tame walk in the park.”


- Student loans outstanding will exceed $1 trillion this year (USA TODAY, Oct. 19, 2011):

Students and workers seeking retraining are borrowing extraordinary amounts of money through federal loan programs, potentially putting a huge burden on the backs of young people looking for jobs and trying to start careers.

The amount of student loans taken out last year crossed the $100 billion mark for the first time and total loans outstanding will exceed $1 trillion for the first time this year. Americans now owe more on student loans than on credit cards, reports the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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Dec 17

In case you are wondering why protesters got violent watch this:

- UK: Mounted Police Charge Fees Protesters (Video), Police Investigate Truncheon Attack

If police launch a truncheon attack like this one at protesters, which could have injured, even killed people, then I find it very much justified that the protesters defended themselves against it.

And now listen to this BBC ‘interview’…



Added: 13. December 2010

20yr old disabled protester Jody McIntyre was disgracefully dragged from his wheelchair by four MET police officers during student protests against the two tier education system being introduced to the UK.

BBC anchorman Ben Brown begins by badgering the shocked victim who suffers from Cerebal Palsy, for not reporting the incident immediately, but who was he going to call, the police or the Ghost Busters??

Next the BBC man suggests that Mr McIntyre menaced the officers by “wheeling towards them”, only to be told by Jody that he has no physical control of his chair. Jody was then asked if he threw any missiles at police, or shouted any abuse that would have provoked the police reaction. What dreadfully soul destroying words did these officers hear??

This is a shameful use of BBC interview intimidation techniques (IIT) against a victim of disgusting police brutality. Shame on the MET police and shame on the BBC.

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Dec 12

Unbelievable! This video is a must-see!

And what will happen next time?



This is complete madness.

All those police officers should be fired and charged with assault.




The police watchdog launched an independent investigation today after a 20-year-old student was left unconscious with bleeding on the brain after being hit on the head with a police truncheon.

Alfie Meadows, a philosophy student at Middlesex University, was struck as he tried to leave the area outside Westminster Abbey during last night’s tuition fee protests, his mother said.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission launched an investigation, but warned that inquiries were still at an early stage.

After falling unconscious on the way to Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Mr Meadows underwent a three-hour operation for bleeding on the brain.

His mother Susan, 55, an English literature lecturer at Roehampton University, said: “He was hit on the head by a police truncheon.

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Dec 10


Added: 9. December 2010

Mass demonstrations by thousands of students and trade unionists in central London against an increase in tuition fees, are growing more violent.

It’s the latest and the largest in a string of rallies against sweeping austerity measures and budget cuts across Europe.

What started as a relatively peaceful march later turned into violent clashes with the police, which is largerly outnumbered by the demonstrators.

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Nov 21

Must-read!



By Ed Dante

Editor’s note: Ed Dante is a pseudonym for a writer who lives on the East Coast. Through a literary agent, he approached The Chronicle wanting to tell the story of how he makes a living writing papers for a custom-essay company and to describe the extent of student cheating he has observed. In the course of editing his article, The Chronicle reviewed correspondence Dante had with clients and some of the papers he had been paid to write. In the article published here, some details of the assignment he describes have been altered to protect the identity of the student.

The request came in by e-mail around 2 in the afternoon. It was from a previous customer, and she had urgent business. I quote her message here verbatim (if I had to put up with it, so should you): “You did me business ethics propsal for me I need propsal got approved pls can you will write me paper?”

I’ve gotten pretty good at interpreting this kind of correspondence. The client had attached a document from her professor with details about the paper. She needed the first section in a week. Seventy-five pages.

I told her no problem.

It truly was no problem. In the past year, I’ve written roughly 5,000 pages of scholarly literature, most on very tight deadlines. But you won’t find my name on a single paper.

I’ve written toward a master’s degree in cognitive psychology, a Ph.D. in sociology, and a handful of postgraduate credits in international diplomacy. I’ve worked on bachelor’s degrees in hospitality, business administration, and accounting. I’ve written for courses in history, cinema, labor relations, pharmacology, theology, sports management, maritime security, airline services, sustainability, municipal budgeting, marketing, philosophy, ethics, Eastern religion, postmodern architecture, anthropology, literature, and public administration. I’ve attended three dozen online universities. I’ve completed 12 graduate theses of 50 pages or more. All for someone else.

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Oct 18

- U.N. Human Rights Council endorses Gaza war crimes report



Added: 16. Oktober 2009

On 15 October 2009, former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert came to give the annual King Abdullah II Leadership Lecture at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy.

Outraged that a man responsible for war crimes in Palestine and Lebanon that killed more than three thousand people during his term of office, community members confronted Olmert inside the lecture hall effectively preventing him from delivering his speech.

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Jul 30

New students informed: No jabs, no enrollment

4514h

Another major school institution has implemented a mandatory vaccination policy that bars both new and current students who haven’t received the meningitis and MMR shots from enrolling for the coming academic year.

The University of Alabama recently sent out an e mail to all its students informing them that they had to provide proof of several different immunizations before they could register for their course.

Failure to provide such proof would mean the students would be forced to take the shots on campus at the Student Health Center – refusal to do so would prevent them from enrolling and could also lead to further judiciary punishment.

The e mail reads as follows;

All freshmen and all new students, regardless of classification, must have:

1) Proof of the meningitis vaccination (Manactra (preferred) or Menomune)
2) If you were born after 1956, proof of two (2) measles containing vaccinations. One of these vaccines must be an MMR vaccination after 1980.
3) Acceptable proof of tuberculosis screening within the last year.

This is a registration requirement, whether transfer or graduate.

If you are living off campus this is still a requirement. Please turn in proof of these immunizations and tuberculosis screening before moving into campus housing or the first day of class if living off campus. All vaccines and tuberculosis screening are available at the Student Health Center. Failure to submit your immunization and TB test requirement could slow down your moving into residence hall room.

The e mail also informs juniors and seniors already living on campus that they need to get a meningitis shot if they haven’t received one in the last four years, even though as the advisory admits, “This is NOT a regular childhood immunization and it was not a requirement when you entered the University of Alabama.”

“Failure of any student regardless of classification not meeting the immunization and tuberculosis screening requirement may result in a disruption in ability to register for classes and possible disciplinary action per Office for Judicial Affairs,” states the e mail.

The MMR vaccine has been linked to autism and inflammatory bowel disease and despite a UK government propaganda campaign to try and convince the public that it is safe, as well as an effort brainwash children, many parents have boycotted the jab in Britain.

Earlier this year, the Daily Mail highlighted the story of 5-year-old Melody Brook, who went from a bouncing and bubbly child to a virtual vegetable after she took the MMR vaccine.

The meningitis vaccine also provoked safety fears after 5,000 children suffered adverse reactions immediately after it was introduced in Britain.

As we have previously highlighted, there is no law in America, aside from those applying to medical workers, that says you or your child has to take any vaccine whatsoever, no matter what any executive order, requirement, mandate or policy dictates, there is no situation where you can go to prison for refusing a government vaccine under the U.S. constitution and the law of the land.

This was particularly prescient for the parents of more than 1600 children in Prince George’s County, Maryland, who in 2007 were told they could be put in jail for failing to get their kids vaccinated. Appearing on the Alex Jones Show, a state prosecutor involved in bringing potential criminal charges against the parents was forced to admit that there was no law that mandated parents to vaccinate their children.

The only way mandatory vaccinations can be enforced in this context is by removing privileges, as in the case with Alabama University preventing immunized students from registering, but many people would argue that education is not a privilege but a human right, and to deny a student enrollment because they refuse to have a needle jabbed in their arm is clearly discriminatory.

The only other way to implement mandatory vaccinations is of course by force, which is what many fear will happen in the event of a mass swine flu pandemic this fall which the government has already assured us is inevitable.

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Jun 19

fingerprint-scanner-students-uk
Clocking in: student Sabrina Nurkoo scans her fingerprint in a lecture at the London School of Commerce

Thousands of foreign students in London are being fingerprinted before classes in a clampdown on illegal immigration.

The London School of Commerce is using US army scanners to record the details of every student on campus and is threatening to report truants to the Home Office.

Managers have ordered the college’s 3,500 students to clock in to lectures with a print from their left and right forefinger or risk being thrown out.

There is growing concern that illegal immigrants exploit private colleges as a backdoor route into Britain, with students using them to secure visas.

Home Office officials also fear they could be targeted by terrorists – 10 men arrested over a suspected bomb plot in Manchester in April were registered as students.

LSC manager Rajiv Gupta said the fingerprint system was crucial. “We want bona fide students – not people who can’t be bothered or are abusing the system. If they are mucking around we don’t want them,” he said.

“If a student misses three sessions we will send them a letter and put them on probation. If things don’t improve we will terminate [their position] and inform the Home Office.”

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Feb 22

A report on the loss of civil liberties was launched yesterday and will be sent to Gordon Brown, Tony Blair, Jacqui Smith and others identified as “the 10 enemies of freedom”.

The Abolition of Freedom Act 2009 was produced by the University College London Students’ Human Rights programme. It shows how “the liberties that we assumed were somehow guaranteed by British culture have been compromised”.



- Blunkett warns over ‘Big Brother’ Britain (Independent):
David Blunkett, who introduced the idea of identity cards when Home Secretary, will issue a stark warning to the Government tomorrow that it is in danger of abusing its power by taking Britain towards a “Big Brother” state.

Spy chief: We risk a police state (The Telegraph):
Dame Stella Rimington, the former head of MI5, has warned that the fear of terrorism is being exploited by the Government to erode civil liberties and risks creating a police state.


The report comes ahead of the Convention on Modern Liberty, which takes place on Saturday at the Institute of Education, London.

Sunday 22 February 2009
David Smith

Source: The Observer

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Feb 01

Relying on the 1998 state Supreme Court ruling which allowed the Boy Scouts of America to deny admittance to gays and atheists, a San Bernardino, California court has ruled that California Lutheran High School does not have to follow anti-discriminatory laws.

California state law forbids anti-gay bias in public schools, but the court determined that California Lutheran is actually a “social organization” and is not subject to such laws.  It was decided, therefore, that the school was within its rights to expel two students for admitting to their sexual orientation.

- You can read the court’s ruling by clicking here.

The case came about as a result of two 11th grade girls who were questioned by the principal about their sexual orientation.  The principal was ‘alerted’ by another student who saw comments written on the girls’ My Space page.

The girls were suspended as a result of the answers given to the principal.

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Jan 14

Students who graduate from university this summer are warned today that their chances of getting a job have virtually disappeared already.

Vacancies for graduates have fallen by 17 per cent since last summer, cutting jobs on offer by thousands, and most vacancies for this year have already been filled according to a survey of the top 100 graduate recruiters published this morning.

The biggest decline has been in investment banking, where jobs on offer have been reduced by 47 per cent year on year, while retailing is down 26 per cent and accountancy by 15 per cent. Over a two-year period the number of media jobs on offer has been cut by 32 per cent. The only employment area where graduate vacancies have increased noticeably are the public services – up 51 per cent over the past two years – and the armed services, which have seen a 17 per cent increase.

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Jul 10

Chemistry pupils have flunked O-level questions from 50 years ago, deepening fears that the subject is being dumbed down.

The teenagers were unable to answer questions from the 1960s and 1970s set by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

The average mark for the 1960s questions was just 16 per cent.


Focused: A 1960 chemistry class

Yesterday, the society warned that pupils are no longer tested in rigorous problem-solving and are instead guided to the right answers.

It said that modern exams use questions that require only one or two lines of working.

Even bright pupils were baffled by many of the old questions, said the RSC chief executive, Richard Pike.

He added: ‘There is no doubt that the clever pupils are as sharp as they ever were, but most are being stifled by an educational system that does not encourage more detailed problem-solving and rigorous thinking.’

Two thousand 16-year-olds from 450 schools entered the online competition, which involved sitting a two-hour paper made up of chemistry O-levels and GCSEs from the past five decades.

Enlarge

Test your chemistry knowledge: Can you answer these?

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May 25

· Lecturers fear threat to academic freedom
· Manual downloaded from US government website

A masters student researching terrorist tactics who was arrested and detained for six days after his university informed police about al-Qaida-related material he downloaded has spoken of the “psychological torture” he endured in custody.

Despite his Nottingham University supervisors insisting the materials were directly relevant to his research, Rizwaan Sabir, 22, was held for nearly a week under the Terrorism Act, accused of downloading the materials for illegal use.

The student had obtained a copy of the al-Qaida training manual from a US government website for his research into terrorist tactics.The case highlights what lecturers are claiming is a direct assault on academic freedom led by the government which, in its attempt to establish a “prevent agenda” against terrorist activity, is putting pressure on academics to become police informers.

Sabir was arrested on May 14 after the document was found by a university staff member on an administrator’s computer. The administrator, Hisham Yezza, an acquaintance of Sabir, had been asked by the student to print the 1,500-page document because Sabir could not afford the printing fees. The pair were arrested under the Terrorism Act, Sabir’s family home was searched and their computer and mobile phones seized. They were released uncharged six days later but Yezza, who is Algerian, was immediately rearrested on unrelated immigration charges and now faces deportation. Continue reading »

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May 13

WASHINGTON — A German graduate student in oceanography at M.I.T. applied to the Transportation Security Administration for a new ID card allowing him to work around ships and docks.

What the student, Wilken-Jon von Appen, received in return was a letter that not only turned him down but added an ominous warning from John M. Busch, a security administration official: “I have determined that you pose a security threat.”

Similar letters have gone to 5,000 applicants across the country who have at least initially been turned down for a Transportation Worker Identification Credential, an ID card meant to guard against acts of terrorism, agency officials said Monday. Continue reading »

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May 07

Dozens of San Diego State University students were arrested after a sweeping drug investigation found that some fraternity members openly dealt drugs and one even sent a mass text message advertising cocaine, authorities said Tuesday.

Two kilograms of cocaine were seized, along with 350 Ecstasy pills, marijuana, psychedelic mushrooms, hash oil, methamphetamine, illicit prescription drugs, several guns and at least $60,000 in cash, authorities said.

Of the 96 people arrested, 75 were students. Eighteen of the students were arrested Tuesday when nine search warrants were executed at various locations including fraternities, said Jesse Rodriguez, San Diego County assistant district attorney.

The undercover probe, dubbed Operation Sudden Fall, was sparked by the cocaine overdose death of a student in May 2007, authorities said. As the investigation continued, another student, from Mesa College, died Feb. 26 of a cocaine overdose at an SDSU fraternity house, the DEA said.

Those arrested included a student who was about to receive a criminal justice degree and another who was to receive a master’s degree in homeland security. Continue reading »

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Apr 03

The Defense Department has announced a new get-tough policy with colleges and universities that interfere with the work of military recruiters and Reserve Officer Training Corps programs.

Under rules that will take effect April 28, defense officials said they want the exact same access to student directories that is provided to all other prospective employers. Continue reading »

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