The Dirt Cheap Cancer Protocol (Full)


Dirt Cheap Protocol (Updated December 22, 2016):

When dealing with cancer, someone in the family should be designated as the “cancer guru” in the family. This person should become an expert in the main protocol. For example, they should study this article and the articles it links to several times to make sure they understand this protocol.

For example, I have been contacted by many cancer patients who described the cancer protocol they were using. In some cases, they were using the Dirt Cheap Protocol, but they were only using three or four of these items. Someone didn’t do their homework. I can’t tell you how many times I have seen this. A patient should use 14 or more of the items in this protocol, not three or four.  Fighting cancer is like fighting a fire, you need enough fire trucks.

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PepsiCo Pursues Ancient Leaf as Cola ‘Breakthrough’

One healthy plant (Stevia) in there does not make ‘junk’ healthy. Stevia is not allowed in foodstuffs and remedies in the EU. I think this is because of the sugar industry in Europe.
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Men harvest the stevia plant in Ybycubua, Paraguay, on Sept. 9, 2008. Photographer: Carlos Bittar/Bloomberg News

Nov. 28 (Bloomberg) — A leaf the Guarani Indians of Paraguay’s jungles used to sweeten drinks for centuries may help Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc. revive flagging sales in the $320 billion-a-year global soft-drink industry.

The Food and Drug Administration is poised to act on allowing a zero-calorie sweetener derived from the stevia plant grown in Paraguay and China. Approval may allow the world’s two largest soda makers to reverse three years of U.S. soft-drink sales declines with beverages containing the natural extract, according to Mariann Montagne, an analyst at Minneapolis-based Thrivent Asset Management.

“They are really desperate for something to pick up colas,” said Montagne, whose firm owns Coca-Cola and PepsiCo among the $70 billion it oversees. “There is definitely a need, and people will respond if they have this natural sweetener.”

The two companies lost a quarter of their market value this year, falling about 8 percentage points more than the Standard & Poor’s 500 Consumer Staples Index, as the world economy slowed. Massimo D’Amore, chief of PepsiCo’s beverage division, said Nov. 20 the company will use a compound made from stevia as an alternative to higher-calorie or artificial sweeteners in some drinks as soon as the government gives “the green light.”

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