Mar 24


10 Health Conspiracy Theories That Turned Out To Be Real (The Truth, March 23, 2014):

Do you believe in any “health conspiracy theories”?  Do you believe that there are “natural cures” for diseases that the medical establishment is not telling you about?  Do you believe that vaccines, cell phones or the fluoride in the water can have a harmful impact on the health of your family?  If you answered yes to any of those questions, you are not alone.  According to one recent survey, approximately half of all Americans believe in at least one “medical conspiracy theory”.  Thanks to the Internet, more people than ever are questioning the established dogma of the medical community.  As a result, more people are starting to make their own health decisions, and this has resulted in quite a backlash from the medical establishment.  They are spending a lot of time, effort and money to combat these “health conspiracy theories”, but as you will see below, quite a few of them have turned out to be real.

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Jun 24

Don’t miss:

Alzheimer’s Disease: Deadly Infectious Cause Known And Hidden – Prions:

The primary transmission of prion diseases is ingestion of prions from the Central Nervous System (Brain, Eyes, Spine and Spinal Fluid) of animals. These unwanted ‘left overs’ were used in animal ‘feed’ for ‘protein’ and ‘mystery meats’ (hotdogs, etc) as ‘filler’. These resilient, nearly indestructible by nature, or cooking, individual factories of plague were spread throughout the populations (animal and human) and around the planet awaiting their ‘activation’ by hydration.


Pork Tapeworms in the Brain (Feb 25, 2012):

A pair of new studies underscore the U.S. public health threat of neurocysticercosis—quite literally having pork tapeworm larvae curled up inside one’s brain—now the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in the world. The first study, The Impact of Neurocysticercosis in California, concluded that “Neurocysticercosis causes appreciable disease and exacts a considerable economic burden in California,” with estimated annual hospital charges exceeding $17 million. The second study, published two weeks ago, is the first to follow the cognitive function and quality of life of those living with these brain parasites.

As you’ll see in today’s video pick below, even after one’s brain is infested with pork tapeworms, some people can go for years before the headaches and seizures start as the larvae begin to multiply. What the second study suggests, though, is that long before the more obvious symptoms present, those who are infected may suffer from mental, social, and cognitive dysfunction. (See video above).

The follow-up video, Avoiding Epilepsy Through Diet, details diagnosis and treatment and reports on a synagogue survey. If pork tapeworms can get inside the brains of orthodox Jews in Brooklyn, then I guess no one’s immune! Turns out it’s not only what we eat that may put us at risk, but also the diets of those who handle our food.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.




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May 29


Remember the 16,000 dead pigs found in Shanghai’s Huangpu river?

China Pulls 1,000 Dead DUCKS From Sichuan River:

The news comes as the toll of dead pigs pulled from Shanghai’s Huangpu river passed 16,000.

So the conditions under which our food is produced … Eating Animals

… will certainly not improve.

Bon appétit!

China’s Shuanghui to Buy Smithfield Foods (Wall Street Journal, May 29, 2013):

Chinese meat producer Shuanghui Group agreed to acquire Smithfield Foods Inc. for about $4.7 billion, striking what would be the largest takeover of a U.S. company by a Chinese buyer—should it get past what is likely to be heavy regulatory scrutiny.

Shuanghui agreed to pay $34 per share for Smithfield, the world’s largest hog farmer and pork processor, marking a 31% premium to Smithfield’s Tuesday closing price of $25.97. Including debt, the deal values Smithfield at $7.1 billion.

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Feb 07



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Jan 18

Pigs raised under oak and beech trees produce the best ham.

But maybe you want to try the lab ‘Petri dish pork’ instead???

LONDON — Call it pork in a Petri dish — a technique to turn pig stem cells into strips of meat that scientists say could one day offer a green alternative to raising livestock, help alleviate world hunger, and save some pigs their bacon.

Dutch scientists have been growing pork in the laboratory since 2006, and while they admit they haven’t gotten the texture quite right or even tasted the engineered meat, they say the technology promises to have widespread implications for our food supply.

“If we took the stem cells from one pig and multiplied it by a factor of a million, we would need one million fewer pigs to get the same amount of meat,” said Mark Post, a biologist at Maastricht University involved in the In-vitro Meat Consortium, a network of publicly funded Dutch research institutions that is carrying out the experiments.

Post describes the texture of the meat as sort of like scallop, firm but a little squishy and moist. That’s because the lab meat has less protein content than conventional meat.

Several other groups in the U.S., Scandinavia and Japan are also researching ways to make meat in the laboratory, but the Dutch project is the most advanced, said Jason Matheny, who has studied alternatives to conventional meat at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore and is not involved in the Dutch research. Continue reading »

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Dec 01

Bon appétit!


SCIENTISTS have grown meat in the laboratory for the first time. Experts in Holland used cells from a live pig to replicate growth in a petri dish.

The advent of so-called “in-vitro” or cultured meat could reduce the billions of tons of greenhouse gases emitted each year by farm animals – if people are willing to eat it.

So far the scientists have not tasted it, but they believe the breakthrough could lead to sausages and other processed products being made from laboratory meat in as little as five years’ time.

They initially extracted cells from the muscle of a live pig. Called myoblasts, these cells are programmed to grow into muscle and repair damage in animals.

The cells were then incubated in a solution containing nutrients to encourage them to multiply indefinitely. This nutritious “broth” is derived from the blood products of animal foetuses, although the intention is to come up with a synthetic solution.

The result was sticky muscle tissue that requires exercise, like human muscles, to turn it into a tougher steak-like consistency.

“You could take the meat from one animal and create the volume of meat previously provided by a million animals,” said Mark Post, professor of physiology at Eindhoven University, who is leading the Dutch government-funded research.

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Nov 06


So what will happen to pork prices?!

Related article: Commercial pigs in Ind. test positive for H1N1 (AP)

(NaturalNews) The pork industry desperately wants you to believe “the Big Lie” about swine flu: That it can’t infect pigs, and therefore it’s perfectly safe to buy and eat lots and lots of pork products.

It’s a merry little tale, and it would be a nice little piece of information to pass along if only it were true.

But it isn’t.

H1N1 swine flu can and does infect pigs. And the safety margin for eating pork products from H1N1-infected pigs is not well known.

In fact, the USDA just confirmed H1N1 infections in commercial pigs (the kind used to make those pork chops you ate for breakfast). This is the first time that a commercial herd of pigs has been publicly acknowledged to be infected with H1N1 swine flu by the USDA. (And we all know from watching the USDA’s behavior on mad cow disease that the agency goes to great lengths to downplay any such reports…)

The timing of the announcement is, not surprisingly, highly suspicious. Just a few days ago, the USDA negotiated an end to the pork import ban placed on U.S. pork products by China. Before the ink on that agreement was even dry, the USDA — surprise! — announced they had discovered this H1N1 infection in commercial swine in the U.S.

This particular commercial herd of swine was located in Indiana. (The USDA isn’t saying where.) But here’s the best part: The USDA did not ban those pigs from being used in the food supply! At least I couldn’t find any such report after scouring the web looking for one. This means these swine flu infected pigs could end up on your dinner table (if you eat pork, that is).

This isn’t the first report of H1N1 infecting pigs in the USA, by the way. A few weeks ago, H1N1 infections were confirmed in show pigs at the Minnesota State Fair. Nobody seemed to care, since people weren’t planning on eating those show pigs (“Looks good on stage, but tastes even better on the plate!”), but now that H1N1 has been found in commercial herds, suddenly things seem different.

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