Jan 24

The grave of murdered ex-KGB agent Aleksandr Litvinenko is seen at Highgate Cemetery in London, Britain, January 21, 2016

Britain had more motivation to kill Aleksandr Litvinenko than Russia, brother claims:

The brother of Aleksandr Litvinenko says the UK government had more motivation to kill him than Russia did, despite a British public inquiry which concluded that President Putin “probably” approved the assassination.

Maksim Litvinenko, Aleksandr’s younger brother who lives in Rimini, Italy, responded to the Thursday report by saying it was “ridiculous” to blame the Kremlin for the murder of his brother, stating that he believes British security services had more of a motive to carry out the assassination. Continue reading »

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Oct 05


The Polonium Conspiracy: Why does Big Agra use chemical fertilizers containing radioactive polonium?:

The Polonium Conspiracy Goes Far Deeper Than Just Tobacco

State of the Nation

SOTN Editor’s Note:

Before the chemical geoengineering phenomenon known as CHEMTRAILS became a daily routine in the skies across America, there was arguably no greater public health disaster than polonium-laced tobacco.  According to scientists who have investigated “The Polonium Conspiracy”, the phosphate fertilizers favored by the Tobacco Industry contain alpha-radioactive polonium, the decay product of Radium-226.

How does radioactive material get into a cigarette?
The tobacco leaves used in making cigarettes contain radioactive material, particularly lead-210 and polonium-210. The radionuclide content of tobacco leaves depends heavily on soil conditions and fertilizer use.

Soils that contain elevated radium lead to high radon gas emanations rising into the growing tobacco crop. Radon rapidly decays into a series of solid, highly radioactive metals (radon decay products). These metals cling to dust particles which in turn are collected by the sticky tobacco leaves. The sticky compound that seeps from the trichomes is not water-soluble, so the particles do not wash off in the rain. There they stay, through curing process, cutting, and manufacture into cigarettes.Lead-210 and Polonium-210 can be absorbed into tobacco leaves directly from the soil. But more importantly, fine, sticky hairs (called trichomes) on both sides of tobacco leaves grab airborne radioactive particles.
(Source: EPA — Tobacco Smoke)

Quite curiously, Big Tobacco has known about this predicament since the mid-1950s yet consistently failed to address it in any appropriate way.  For this reason tobacco products have always possessed unacceptable levels of highly carcinogenic polonium.  It has also been known that the primary cause of lung cancer among smokers is due to both the chemical properties and radioactivity associated with the polonium 210 radionuclides. Continue reading »

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Jun 26

As a side note:

Every time you are smoking a cigarette, you are inhaling polonium. Big Tobacco knows this and could easily remove the polonium, BUT that would greatly reduce the nicotine hit smokers are getting from smoking a cigarette, thereby smoking would be much less addictive and that would result in less profit (and cancer).


NASA Experts: Southeast US hit by “anomalously high” levels of polonium from Fukushima — Never seen before, except during volcanic events — Fallout also detected in Mississippi river — Polonium releases kept secret in past nuclear disasters; Death estimates would skyrocket if included (ENENews, June 26, 2015):

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, W. Yang and L. Guo, NASA Stennis Space Center and Univ. of Southern Mississippi Dept. of Marine Science, 2012 (emphasis added): Depositional fluxes and residence time of atmospheric radioiodine (131I) from the Fukushima accident

  • The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant explosions… emitted vast quantities of radioactive materials into the environment… radioiodine (131I)… 134Cs and 137Cs are of special concern to people because they could trigger dangerous health effects Continue reading »

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Jul 21

Everytime you’re smoking a cigarette you are inhaling radioactive polonium.

The tobacco industry knows this and could easily remove the polonium from your cigarettes, but that would greatly reduce the ‘nicotine hit’ you’ll get from smoking, which would greatly reduce your addiction to smoking, which would be bad news for their profits.

US widow awarded $23.6bn tobacco payout (Al Jazeera, July 20, 2014):

Jury says tobacco firm RJ Reynolds did not inform woman’s chain-smoking husband of risks before he died of lung cancer.

A Florida jury has awarded the widow of a chain-smoker who died of lung cancer punitive damages of more than $23bn in her case against the RJ Reynolds Tobacco, the nation’s second-largest cigarette maker.

The judgment, returned on Friday night in a Pensacola court, was the largest in Florida history in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by an individual, according to the woman’s legal team. Continue reading »

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