May 27

Record Rainfall in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Nebraska (Ice Age Now, May 27, 2015):

Several cities have already seen one of their  wettest MONTHS on record. And the month isn’t over. And there’s more rain in the forecast

Fort Smith, Arkansas – With 18.33 inches of rain through 2:00 a.m. Tuesday, Fort Smith broke the previous record of 15.02 inches in June 1945, making it the wettest month on record

Oklahoma City – On Saturday, the city broke its June 1989 record of 14.66 inches to become the wettest month in Oklahoma City history. Continue reading »

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Oct 27


YouTube Added: 23.10.2013

Description:

Congress held discussions to sell the National Parks during the government shutdown through the Disposal of Excess Federal Lands Act, spearheaded by Jason Chaffetz (R-UT).

The sale would cover national parks in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, & Wyoming as a measure to “reduce the federal deficit.” We discuss the proposal on this Buzzsaw news clip with Tyrel Ventura and Tabetha Wallace.

Watch the full episode here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8_FGH…

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Nov 16

What Does It Mean that Residents in All 50 States Have Filed Petitions to Secede? (ZeroHedge, Nov 16, 2012):

A lot of attention is being given to the fact that residents in all 50 states have filed petitions to secede from the United States.

Daily Caller reports:

By 6:00 a.m. EST Wednesday, more than 675,000 digital signatures appeared on 69 separate secession petitions covering all 50 states, according to a Daily Caller analysis of requests lodged with the White House’s “We the People” online petition system.

***

Petitions from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North CarolinaTennessee and Texas residents have accrued at least 25,000 signatures, the number the Obama administration says it will reward with a staff review of online proposals. (RELATEDWill Texas secede? Petition triggers White House review)

The Texas petition leads all others by a wide margin.

***

States whose active petitions have not yet reached the 25,000 signature threshold include Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

***

Fourteen states are represented by at least two competing petitions. The extra efforts from two states — Missouri and South Carolina — would add enough petitions to warrant reviews by the Obama administration if they were combined into petitions launched earlier.

Other states with multiple efforts include Alaska, California, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin.

As Google notes, web searches for the term “secession” are being run in a number of states: Continue reading »

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Nov 03


YouTube

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Jul 11

Experts expect more Missouri River levee failures (Kansas City Star, Jul. 09, 2011):

Several hundred thousand acres of rich Midwestern farmland and even some urban areas near the Missouri River are at risk of flooding this summer during months of historically high water that experts fear will overwhelm some levees, especially older ones.

Engineers who have studied past floods say the earthen levees in rural areas are at greater risk.

“Most of the levees are agricultural levees. They’re not engineered. They’re just dirt piled up,” said David Rogers, an engineering professor at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

So far, most levees have held along the 811 miles the Missouri travels from the last dam at Gavins Point in South Dakota to its confluence with the Mississippi River near St. Louis. The flooding thus far has covered more than 560,000 acres of mostly rural land, including nearly 447,000 acres of farmland. The water has forced some evacuations, but the extent of the damage to may not be clear until it recedes.

That’s not expected to happen until the fall as the Army Corps of Engineers says it needs to continue releasing substantial amounts of water from upstream reservoirs inundated with heavy spring rains and melt from an above average Rocky Mountain snowpack.

The Corps predicts that the river will eventually rise high enough to flow over some 18 to 70 levees, mostly in rural areas of southeast Nebraska, southwest Iowa and Missouri. Other levees will become saturated, and water can erode their foundations, seep underneath or find other flaws to exploit.

Continue reading »

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Jul 01

Fukushima Spews, Los Alamos Burns, Vermont Rages & We Almost Lost Nebraska (Hawaii Daily News, June, 29, 2011):

Humankind is now threatened by the simultaneous implosion, explosion, incineration, courtroom contempt and drowning of its most lethal industry.

We know only two things for certain:  worse is yet to come, and those in charge are lying about it—at least to the extent of what they actually know, which is nowhere near enough.

Indeed, the assurances from the nuke power industry continue to flow like the floodwaters now swamping the Missouri Valley heartland.

But major breakthroughs have come from a Pennsylvania Senator and New York’s Governor on issues of evacuation and shut-down.  And a public campaign for an end to loan guarantees could put an end to the US industry once and for all.

FUKUSHIMA: The bad news continues to bleed from Japan with no end in sight.  The “light at the end of the tunnel” is an out-of-control radioactive freight train, headed to the core of an endangered planet.

Widespread internal radioactive contamination among Japanese citizens around Fukushima has now been confirmed.

Two whales caught some 650 kilometers from the melting reactors have shown intense radiation.

Plutonium, the deadliest substance known to our species, has been found dangerously far from the site.

Continue reading »

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Jun 30


Added: 28.06.2011

Meet one of the large number of safety systems:

The Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant Bucket Brigade: Nuclear Workers Have To Carry Fuel Cans To Keep Water Pumps Running

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Jun 28

Nuclear Plant’s Vital Equipment Dry, Officials Say (New York Times, June 27, 2011):

FORT CALHOUN, Neb. — When safety regulators arrive for a tour of a nuclear plant, the operators usually give the visitors a helmet, safety glasses and earplugs. When Gregory B. Jaczko, chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, got to the Fort Calhoun plant on Monday morning, the Omaha Public Power District offered him a life jacket.

Continue reading »

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Jun 27


An aerial view of the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Plant in eastern Nebraska, surrounded by Missouri River flood waters on June 24.

Waters Encircle Nuclear Plant (Wall Street Journal, June 27, 2011):

A protective berm holding back floodwaters from a Nebraska nuclear power plant collapsed early Sunday after it was accidentally torn, surrounding containment buildings and key electrical equipment with Missouri River overflow.

The berm’s collapse allowed floodwaters to wash around the main electrical transformers. As a result, emergency diesel power generators were started. Later in the day, power was restored.

The NRC’s Mr. Dricks said temperature monitors were working properly and temperatures of key parts of the nuclear power plant were normal. Water has not seeped into any of the containment structures, he said.

Even when in shutdown mode, a nuclear plant requires electricity to keep key components cool in order to avoid any degradation or melting of the core that could result in the release of radiation.

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Jun 27

Flood berm bursts at Nebraska nuclear plant (CNN, June 27, 2011):

A water-filled berm protecting a nuclear power plant in Nebraska from rising floodwaters collapsed Sunday, according to a spokesman, who said the plant remains secure.

Some sort of machinery came in contact with the berm, puncturing it and causing the berm to deflate, said Mike Jones, a spokesman for the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), which owns the Fort Calhoun plant.

Continue reading »

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Jun 27

Fort Calhoun Nuclear Plant: Flood Seeps Into Turbine Building At Nebraska Nuke Station (Huffington Post, June 27, 2011):

OMAHA — Missouri River floodwater seeped into the turbine building at a nuclear power plant near Omaha on Monday, but plant officials said the seepage was expected and posed no safety risk because the building contains no nuclear material.

An 8-foot-tall, water-filled temporary berm protecting the plant collapsed early Sunday. Vendor workers were at the plant Monday to determine whether the 2,000 foot berm can be repaired.

Continue reading »

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Jun 27

A Nuclear Plant’s Flood Defenses Trigger a Yearlong Regulatory Confrontation (New York Times, June 24, 2011):

Pictures of the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant north of Omaha, Neb., show it encircled by the swollen waters of the Missouri River, which reached a height of nearly 1,007 feet above sea level at the plant yesterday.

The plant’s defenses include new steel gates and other hard barriers protecting an auxiliary building with vital reactor controls, and a water-filled berm 8 feet tall that encircles other parts of the plant. Both systems are designed to hold back floodwaters reaching 1,014 feet above sea level. Additional concrete barriers and permanent berms, more sandbags and another power line into the plant have been added. The plant was shut down in April for refueling and will remain so until the flood threat is passed.

“Today the plant is well positioned to ride out the current extreme Missouri River flooding while keeping the public safe,” Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman Victor Dricks said on an agency blog this week.

But a year ago, those new defenses were not in place, and the plant’s hard barriers could have failed against a 1,010-foot flood, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission contends in a yearlong inspection and enforcement action against the plant’s operator, the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD).

The NRC in Action at Fort Calhoun (Monthly Review, June 27, 2011):

The Union of Concerned Scientists often complains about Nuclear Regulatory Commission inaction — the agency’s failure to enforce its regulations prohibiting unmonitored and uncontrolled releases of radioactively contaminated water, the agency’s tolerance of four dozen reactors operating in violation of fire protection regulations, and so on.

Today, we commend the NRC in action.

Continue reading »

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Jun 23

Although the Fort Calhoun plant is surrounded by an eight foot tall and 16 foot wide protective berm, two feet of water have already made its way to several areas of the Fort Calhoun plant, but authorities say there is no immediate danger at either plant.


Sirens Blare as Flooding Hits North Dakota (ABC News, June 22, 2011):

Sirens are blaring at this moment in Minot, N.D., as the overflowing Souris River floods over the top of local levees five hours before the evacuation deadline for 11,000 residents. Farther south, the overflowing Missouri River has put two nuclear power plants at risk, necessitated evacuations and produced a travel nightmare as interstate highways shut down.

“What I see right now is probably the most devastating in terms of the number of people directly impacted and what will likely be the damage to homes as the water begins to overtop the levees and fill in behind,” National Guard Cmdr. Dave Sprynczynatyk said today.

Nearly 500 North Dakota National Guard soldiers are in the town of 41,000 people to help the last stragglers in the affected area get out of harm’s way. They are accompanying the roaring sirens with shouts of “All residents must evacuate!”

“We’ve never seen anything like what we’re expecting,” Minot Mayor Curt Zimbleman told ABC News. The mayor had warned residents previously today that the river could top the levees earlier than expected, and has been urging residents to leave potentially affected areas.

Continue reading »

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Jun 20

River inches toward nuke plant shutdown level (Journal Star, June 20, 2011):

The Missouri River rose to record height Sunday at Brownville, prompting Cooper Nuclear Station three miles south of the community to declare a low-level emergency at 2:06 a.m.

NPPD said it would take the plant offline if the water level reached 902 feet above sea level. At 6 p.m., the level was 901.73 feet.

Water levels at the Brownville gauge increased approximately two feet in a 24-hour period from 5:30 a.m. Saturday to 5:30 a.m. Sunday.

Record River Surge Recorded In Southeast Nebraska (WOWT, Jun 20, 2011):

The Missouri River surged to a new record at Brownville in southeast Nebraska Sunday afternoon as workers have been adding sandbags to the levee.

The National Weather Service said the river measured at 44.75 feet surpassing a record of 44.3 feet set in 1993. Flood stage is 33 feet.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said the river level at Brownville surged two feet from Saturday morning to Sunday morning. Col. Bob Ruch attributed that to heavy rain on the Nishnabotna River, which flows into the Missouri,
and to some erosion along a levee upstream at Hamburg, Iowa, that created a water pulse.

The Nebraska Emergency Management Agency says water was flowing over a levee there and into farmland, but the levee is being built up.

Continue reading »

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Jun 19

Declaration at Cooper Nuclear Station (June 19, 2011):

As the Missouri River rises, the Nebraska Public Power District has declared a “Notification of Unusual Event” for the Cooper Nuclear Station. The notification was made at 4:02am Sunday. It is part of the safety and emergency preparedness plan that the station follows when certain flooding conditions are present.

NPPD says there is no threat to plant employees or the general public. The plant continues to operate safely. The Omaha Public Power District made the same declaration nearly two weeks ago when the Missouri River continued to rise near the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Station.

Continue reading »

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Jun 18


FILE – In this June 14, 2011 file photo, the Fort Calhoun nuclear power station, in Fort Calhoun, Neb., is surrounded by flood waters from the Missouri River. The pictures of a Nebraska nuclear power plant were startling: Floodwaters from the swollen Missouri River had risen nearly to the reactor building, with the potential to climb even higher.

See also:

Floodwaters Might Hit Kansas City By Midweek – Army Corps Running Out Of Options – ‘At This Point, We Have Very Little Flexibility Remaining’


Dear Nebraska: Sorry about water, but more on the way. Love, Montana (JournalStar, June 17, 2011):

From his tackle shop near Three Forks, Mont., Rich Gay is watching three rivers.

They’re running high out of the mountains, skirting his town, fraying his nerves and converging, more than a mile away.

This is the headwaters of the Missouri River — and the source this summer of so much Nebraska pain.

But this isn’t where the flood begins.

Continue reading »

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Jun 15

Governor: Punishing amounts of water threaten levees (JournalStar, June 14, 2011):

…..

The river at Sioux City, Iowa, reached 33.12 feet by midafternoon Tuesday, down from 33.55 feet in the morning, as the release from Gavins Point Dam in Yankton, S.D., reached a historic high of 150,000 cubic feet per second.

Most levees around the Missouri River are built to withstand surge waters for three to four days, according to Nebraska Emergency Management officials.

This year, they likely will face punishing amounts of water for several months as the Army Corps of Engineers releases record amounts of water from Gavins Point.

……

Farther south, near Fort Calhoun, farmland and the nuclear power plant are surrounded by floodwaters, Heineman said. The power plant is offline for routine maintenance.

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Jun 15


Added: 14.06.2011


Added: 14.06.2011


Added: 15.06.2011

(full 40 minutes) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHZdub3n0mI

download the audio podcast here:
http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/52367

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Jun 15

Ft. Calhoun Flood Defenses (WOWT, June 14, 2011):

The Ft. Calhoun Nuclear Facility is an island right now but it is one that authorities say is going to stay dry. They say they have a number of redundant features to protect the facility from flood waters that include the aqua dam, earthen berms and sandbags.

From the air the nuclear plant looks like it is about to be swallowed up by the Missouri River but on the ground you can see that man is controlling nature, or at least keeping her in check.

Jeff Hanson says, “We’re protected far above where this is projected to go.”

It helps that the facility was built to withstand a 500-year flood event and Hanson says there are feet of protection between the Missouri and the important structures on site.

That was before the aqua dams were put in place. Hanson says the plant has plans and procedures in place and practice flood defense. The aqua dams add another layer of protection from flooding.

Jeff Hanson says, “Protecting the vital assets we have sandbagged and placed earthen berms around the substations which guarantees the power can get into the plant to keep the plant powered.”

The facility was taken offline to refuel earlier this year so the containment building has been flooded by OPPD in order to cool the fuel rods.

Continue reading »

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Jun 10

Electrical Fire Knocks Out Spent Fuel Cooling at Nebraska Nuclear Plant (Scientific American, June 9, 2011):

The safety of spent fuel pools, as at the Fort Calhoun plant outside Omaha, has been an issue since the accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant

A fire in an electrical switch room on Tuesday briefly knocked out cooling for a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the Fort Calhoun nuclear plant outside Omaha, Neb., plant officials said.

The safety of deep pools used to store used radioactive fuel at nuclear plants has been an issue since the accident at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant in March. If the cooling water a pool is lost, the used nuclear fuel could catch fire and release radiation.

Continue reading »

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Apr 30

See also:

–  ‘HAARP Tornadoes’ Force Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Into Emergency Shutdown

HAARP Rings And Scalar Squares Cause – As Predicted – MASSIVE Tornado Outbreak (04/28/2011)

US: HAARP Rings And Scalar Squares – From Dallas To Watertown NY Expect Tornados And Severe Weather (04/27/2011)

HAARP is real:

Former Governor Jesse Ventura on Government Cover-Ups . . . 9/11, the Reality of HAARP and Making Government Better

Jesse Ventura Conspiracy Theory: ‘HAARP’ (Full Episode)



Added: 30.04.2011

In the towns of Saint Louis Missouri, Springfield Illinois, Omaha Nebraska, Lacrosse Wisconsin, and Dixon to Chicago Illinois, and Milwaukee… expect severe weather up to and including tornadoes in the next 24-48 hours from now .. 300am CST 4/30/2011 .

Based upon the “HAARP VLF UHF” radar rings showing up around each effected area.

http://www.intellicast.com/Local/WxMapFull.aspx

http://www.theweathernetwork.com/weather/maps/?ref=topnav_homepage_maps

http://weather.unisys.com/radar/rcm_rad.php?inv=0&t=cur&region=us

http://radar.weather.gov/Conus/full_loop.php Continue reading »

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