Dec 02


Added:  1. December 2010

Mike Utsler, Chief Operating Officer of BP’s Gulf Coast Restoration, admits publicly “There is a new form of microbiology that is attacking this (oil) plume and using it as a food source”. This brief video snippet is taken from a Novermber 7, 2010 broadcast by BBC TWO entitled ‘Has the Oil Really Gone?’ by reporter Stephen Fry and can be seen in it’s entirety at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00vy…

Notice how Utsler is cut off by his own people at BP immediately after stating this and the interview was abruptly ended.

To understand exactly what this synthetic genome “new form of Microbiology” is, go to:

THE GULF BLUE PLAGUE (BP)
http://worldvisionportal.org/wvpforum…

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Jun 03


Added: 17. May 2010

The Texas Land Office and Texas Water Commission successfully used ‘oil eating’ microbes to clean up large oil spills in just weeks.

Microbes hunt down and eat the toxic oil and leave only a biodegradable waste that is non-toxic to humans and marine life. Marshland and beaches were pristine again in just weeks—not years like the Exxon Valdez spill. Continue reading »

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May 27

Getting ordinary plastic bags to rot away like banana peels would be an environmental dream come true.

After all, we produce 500 billion a year worldwide and they take up to 1,000 years to decompose. They take up space in landfills, litter our streets and parks, pollute the oceans and kill the animals that eat them.

Now a Waterloo teenager has found a way to make plastic bags degrade faster — in three months, he figures.

Daniel Burd’s project won the top prize at the Canada-Wide Science Fair in Ottawa. He came back with a long list of awards, including a $10,000 prize, a $20,000 scholarship, and recognition that he has found a practical way to help the environment.

Daniel, a 16-year-old Grade 11 student at Waterloo Collegiate Institute, got the idea for his project from everyday life.

“Almost every week I have to do chores and when I open the closet door, I have this avalanche of plastic bags falling on top of me,” he said. “One day, I got tired of it and I wanted to know what other people are doing with these plastic bags.”

The answer: not much. So he decided to do something himself.

He knew plastic does eventually degrade, and figured microorganisms must be behind it. His goal was to isolate the microorganisms that can break down plastic — not an easy task because they don’t exist in high numbers in nature.

First, he ground plastic bags into a powder. Next, he used ordinary household chemicals, yeast and tap water to create a solution that would encourage microbe growth. To that, he added the plastic powder and dirt. Then the solution sat in a shaker at 30 degrees. Continue reading »

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Mar 15

A high-security laboratory where deadly microbes are being grown by scientists seeking defenses against terrorist attacks began operating in Livermore last week without public announcement, and opponents said Friday that they will go to federal court in an effort to close the facility down. Continue reading »

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