The Pneumonic Plague Is Spreading: Warnings in 9 Countries

The Pneumonic Plague Is Spreading: Warnings in 9 Countries:

Madagascar isn’t getting this epidemic of the pneumonic plague under control as everyone had hoped. In fact, the opposite seems to be true.

When I wrote about the plague less than two weeks ago, I cited a source that said there were 200 infections and 33 deaths. As of today, those numbers have increased dramatically to more than 1300 infections and 124 deaths.

According to many infectious disease experts, the outbreak has not yet reached its peak. It’s urgent that we stay up-to-date on this epidemic so that we can be prepared if it goes worldwide. (Sign up here to receive a daily update on the topics important to preppers and follow me here for all the most important news links..)

Read more

New ‘Black Death’ FOUND: Deadly virus WORSE than plague and with no CURE breaks out – WHO

New ‘Black Death’ FOUND: Deadly virus WORSE than plague and with no CURE breaks out – WHO:

A DEADLY outbreak of a rare and highly fatal virus has broken out in eastern Uganda and five cases have already been identified, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has confirmed.

The disease, known as Marburg virus disease (MVD), is similar to Ebola and can be lethal in up to 90 per cent of cases.Emergency screening has begun at the Kenya-Uganda border in Turkana after three members of the same family died of the disease in Uganda.

Read more

Madagascar plague outbreak: WHO helps countries prepare for further spread after death toll rises to 124 (1,200 infected)

Related info:

BLACK DEATH SPREADS: Deadly outbreak of plague in Madagascar is getting MUCH WORSE and is now being transmitted from person-to-person THROUGH AIR

*****

Madagascar plague outbreak: WHO helps countries prepare for further spread after death toll rises to 124:

World Health Organisation intervenes to stem outbreak that has infected 1,200

An outbreak of pneumonic plague in Madagascar has infected 1,231 people and caused 124 deaths since the start of August.

Nine countries and territories with trade and travel links to Madagascar, including tourist hotspots like Seychelles, Mauritius and the French territory La Réunion, have been advised to review their protocols for quarantining infected visitors.

The World Health Organisation (WHO), which has been helping countries to prepare, told The Independent  this was normal practise and “not directly linked” to the risk of the disease spreading.

Plague is endemic to parts of Madagascar with around 500 cases reported annually. But the current outbreak has reached densely populated cities and regions where it is not usually present, and are less prepared to handle cases.

Read more

Madagascar Hospitals On High Alert: “No One Is Safe” From The Black Plague

Is it a biological weapon test?

Related info:

BLACK DEATH SPREADS: Deadly outbreak of plague in Madagascar is getting MUCH WORSE and is now being transmitted from person-to-person THROUGH AIR

*****

– Madagascar Hospitals On High Alert: “No One Is Safe” From The Black Plague:

Travelers are being warned to keep their distance from areas of Madagascar affected by the bubonic plague. As the outbreak worsens, some doctors are even warning that “no one is safe” from the disease.

The outbreak of the black plague in Madagascar has so far killed 97 people, and doctors are warning that it will be continuing to spread and worsen, meaning no one is safe. Health officials say the disease, which contributed to the deaths of more than 50 million people in Europe during the Middle Ages, has spread from rural areas to the more urban areas not usually affected. Hundreds of cases are reported on the tropical island every year, but experts are warning the epidemic is “much more dangerous” than in previous years.

Read more

BLACK DEATH SPREADS: Deadly outbreak of plague in Madagascar is getting MUCH WORSE and is now being transmitted from person-to-person THROUGH AIR

BLACK DEATH SPREAD: Deadly outbreak of plague in Madagascar is getting WORSE, aid group warns:

More than 100 have been killed and 1,300 infected with the pneumonic plague since August. The outbreak has led to UK authorities warning Brits off visiting the African wildlife paradise.

WORLD health experts today warned an outbreak of the Black Death in Madagascar will get even worse.

More than 100 have been killed and 1,300 infected with the pneumonic plague since August – leading UK authorities to warn Brits off visiting the African wildlife paradise.

And now health officials are warning things will get even worse before they get better.

Olivier Le Guillou of Action Again Hunger said: “We have not yet reached the peak.”

Health officials say the disease has now become much more contagious because it is now being transmitted from person-to-person through the air as well as from animals to humans through infected flea bites.

Read more

57 Dead, Over 680 Infected As Madagascar Plague Outbreak Escalates

57 Dead, Over 680 Infected As Madagascar Plague Outbreak Escalates:

An outbreak of the plague in Madagascar is spreading at an unprecedented rate.

With the ease of spreading the plague, the likelihood that this disease will move to other more densely populated regions of the planet has become a huge concern for many.

So far, the plague has claimed 57 lives and infected more than 680 others. These figures are from October 12, however, and the disease is spreading rapidly. An estimated 329 of these cases and 25 of the deaths were in the capital city of Antananarivo. Of the 684 cases reported as of October 12, 474 were the pneumonic plague, 156 bubonic and 1 septicemic plague. A further 54 were unspecified, according to the World Health Organization. Of Madagascar’s 114 districts, 35 have reported cases of plague, including at least 10 cities.

Read more

WHO Warns of Dangerous Madagascar Pneumonic Plague Outbreak

WHO Warns of Dangerous Madagascar Pneumonic Plague Outbreak:

The World Health Organization (WHO) sent over a million doses of antibiotics to the African island nation of Madagascar after it was hit by an outbreak of pneumonic plague, the most virulent form of the deadly disease.

The plague outbreak in Madagascar island has resulted in some 200 confirmed infections and more than 30 deaths since August. Although the disease is endemic to the Indian Ocean island nation, with hundreds of cases reported annually, it normally hits in the form of Bubonic plague, transmitted when people are bitten by infected fleas carried by rats. Those outbreaks generally occur in remote rural areas of the island.

H/t reader squodgy:

“All these little incidents seem to be co-ordinated experiments.
Without being alarmist, the similarity with the way we were introduced to Bird Flu, Zika and Ebola in recent years, plus the mutating of the viruses by design to make them totally lethal, is indicative of the real probability of concerted deep state de-population programmes in the not too distant future.”

* * *

PayPal: Donate in USD
PayPal: Donate in EUR
PayPal: Donate in GBP

Diplomat probing MH370 mystery is shot dead in Madagascar amid conspiracy theorist claims he was about to deliver newly-found parts of the jet to Malaysian investigators

Diplomat probing MH370 mystery is shot dead in Madagascar amid conspiracy theorist claims he was about to deliver newly-found parts of the jet to Malaysian investigators

H/t reader kevin a.

* * *

PayPal: Donate in USD
PayPal: Donate in EUR
PayPal: Donate in GBP

Plague Outbreak KillS Dozens In Madagascar

Yersinia pestis bacteria

Experts raise alarm as plague kills dozens in Madagascar (CNN, Jan 31, 2015):

(CNN)An outbreak of the plague has killed dozens in Madagascar, and experts fear those numbers could go up.

At least 119 cases were confirmed by late last year, including 40 deaths, the World Health Organization said in a statement.

And the disease is taking an alarming turn.

Read more

The 21st-century African land grab by rich countries facing global food and water shortages

Highly recommended article.


An Observer investigation reveals how rich countries faced by a global food shortage now farm an area double the size of the UK to guarantee supplies for their citizens

the-21st-century-african-land-grab-by-rich-countries-faced-by-global-food-and-water-shortages
A woman tends vegetables at a giant Saudi-financed farm in Ethiopia.

We turned off the main road to Awassa, talked our way past security guards and drove a mile across empty land before we found what will soon be Ethiopia’s largest greenhouse. Nestling below an escarpment of the Rift Valley, the development is far from finished, but the plastic and steel structure already stretches over 20 hectares – the size of 20 football pitches.

The farm manager shows us millions of tomatoes, peppers and other vegetables being grown in 500m rows in computer controlled conditions. Spanish engineers are building the steel structure, Dutch technology minimises water use from two bore-holes and 1,000 women pick and pack 50 tonnes of food a day. Within 24 hours, it has been driven 200 miles to Addis Ababa and flown 1,000 miles to the shops and restaurants of Dubai, Jeddah and elsewhere in the Middle East.

Ethiopia is one of the hungriest countries in the world with more than 13 million people needing food aid, but paradoxically the government is offering at least 3m hectares of its most fertile land to rich countries and some of the world’s most wealthy individuals to export food for their own populations.

The 1,000 hectares of land which contain the Awassa greenhouses are leased for 99 years to a Saudi billionaire businessman, Ethiopian-born Sheikh Mohammed al-Amoudi, one of the 50 richest men in the world. His Saudi Star company plans to spend up to $2bn acquiring and developing 500,000 hectares of land in Ethiopia in the next few years. So far, it has bought four farms and is already growing wheat, rice, vegetables and flowers for the Saudi market. It expects eventually to employ more than 10,000 people.

But Ethiopia is only one of 20 or more African countries where land is being bought or leased for intensive agriculture on an immense scale in what may be the greatest change of ownership since the colonial era.

An Observer investigation estimates that up to 50m hectares of land – an area more than double the size of the UK – has been acquired in the last few years or is in the process of being negotiated by governments and wealthy investors working with state subsidies. The data used was collected by Grain, the International Institute for Environment and Development, the International Land Coalition, ActionAid and other non-governmental groups.

The land rush, which is still accelerating, has been triggered by the worldwide food shortages which followed the sharp oil price rises in 2008, growing water shortages and the European Union’s insistence that 10% of all transport fuel must come from plant-based biofuels by 2015.

Read more

Rich countries launch great land grab to safeguard food supply

  • States and companies target developing nations
  • Small farmers at risk from industrial-scale deals

Rich governments and corporations are triggering alarm for the poor as they buy up the rights to millions of hectares of agricultural land in developing countries in an effort to secure their own long-term food supplies.

The head of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation, Jacques Diouf, has warned that the controversial rise in land deals could create a form of “neo-colonialism”, with poor states producing food for the rich at the expense of their own hungry people.

Rising food prices have already set off a second “scramble for Africa”. This week, the South Korean firm Daewoo Logistics announced plans to buy a 99-year lease on a million hectares in Madagascar. Its aim is to grow 5m tonnes of corn a year by 2023, and produce palm oil from a further lease of 120,000 hectares (296,000 acres), relying on a largely South African workforce. Production would be mainly earmarked for South Korea, which wants to lessen dependence on imports.

“These deals can be purely commercial ventures on one level, but sitting behind it is often a food security imperative backed by a government,” said Carl Atkin, a consultant at Bidwells Agribusiness, a Cambridge firm helping to arrange some of the big international land deals.

Read more

Cyclone heads to Mozambique tourist area and Madagascar

MAPUTO, March 13 (Reuters) – The tropical cyclone that has lashed parts of Mozambique, killing 10 people, is expected to hit the southern tourist region of the country before gathering speed on its way to Madagascar, authorities said on Thursday.

Cyclone Jokwe struck ferociously last Friday, displacing 55,000 people, destroying electricity pylons and uprooting trees in the northern Nampula province.

“It is too dangerous for shipping. It is now over the Mozambique channel on its current course and is likely to strike both Mozambique and Madagascar again,” Mussa Mustafa, head of the National Institute of Meteorology, said in an interview.

Read more