Apr 30

Undercover journalists find shockingly high levels of feces bacteria on ice at KFC outlet:

The fast-food chain KFC is conducting an investigation into one of its UK restaurants after undercover reporters were served ice that harbored harmful bacteria found in feces.

The reporters who made the discovery were part of an undercover report conducted by BBC’s Rip Off Britain, which was investigating food hygiene at major fast food restaurants and coffee shops. The reporters were served ice at the Martineau Place branch of the KFC, reports Inquisitr.

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Jul 24

At KFC in China the Ice Cubes are “Dirtier than Toilet Water” (Liberty Blitzkrieg, July 24, 2013):

I’ve covered food fraud, stealth inflation and related topics rather consistently for the past couple of years. As one might expect, China has been a hot spot for such activity, including the classic example of rat meat being served as lamb on the streets of Shanghai. Well here’s the latest controversy, ice cubes at KFC that are not just dirtier than toilet water, but 13x dirtier. YUM!

From Business Week:

Having battered KFC with reports last year that the company sold chicken fattened on illegal drugs, China Central Television now says the ice cubes at a KFC restaurant are dirtier than toilet water. The state-owned broadcaster found that ice in a Beijing outlet had 13 times as much bacteria as water from a toilet bowl and 20 times the national limit. (McDonald’s ice, according to the CCTV report, had less bacteria than toilet water but still didn’t meet national standards.)

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Jun 29

How Many Calories Does A Dollar Buy? (ZeroHedge, June 29, 2013):

Whether you like it or not, America, the number of calories packed into fast-food eats are getting harder to ignore. McDonald’s, Subway and Panera Bread – and as of this week, Starbucks – have already begun voluntarily posting calorie counts on their menus, ahead of an anticipated federal mandate requiring all restaurants with more than 20 locations to do so. In the interest of openness and transparency, and as Marketwatch notes, assuming for a moment that you’re less worried about your waistline than about getting the most calories for the least amount of money, here are the highest-calorie menu items at 10 of the nation’s top fast-food restaurants offers the most bang for your buck.

Via MarketWatch,

#10 Panera Bread

* Steak and white cheddar on a French baguette, 980 calories

* $1 buys 112 calories

Panera has a lot of light, healthy-sounding items on its menus but the full steak and white cheddar on a French baguette isn’t among them, tallying 980 calories and 103 grams of carbs. That accounts for nearly half the USDA’s recommended daily intake of carbs. At $8.79, you’re getting a little more than one calorie per penny. Continue reading »

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Jan 09

It’s A Brain? It’s A Kidney? It’s KFC’s Next PR Nightmare (ZeroHedge, Jan 8, 2013):

As if Yum Brands were not suffering enough this morning – as they forecast China comp sales to drop 6% (more than the forecast 4% decline), it seems the UK has their next PR disaster waiting to happen, courtesy of their KFC brand. After a 19-year-old Brit found a “horrible wrinkled foreign body” in his fried chicken meal, KFC has apologized (rather magnanimously) saying “while there was no health risk, we agree it was unsightly.” Judge for yourself just how puke-worthy and generally emotionally scarred you would have been after biting into this ‘brain-looking’ image. KFC clarifies: “Although we haven’t received the product, it appears from a photograph that unfortunately on this occasion a kidney, and not a brain as claimed, was not removed in the preparation process.” Oh, just a kidney? Pass the salt then.

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Jul 09

15 Food Companies That Serve You ‘Wood’ (The Street):

NEW YORK (TheStreet) — Are you getting what you pay for on your plate?

The recent class-action lawsuit brought against Taco Bell raised questions about the quality of food many Americans eat each day.

Chief among those concerns is the use of cellulose (read: wood pulp), an extender whose use in a roster of food products, from crackers and ice creams to puddings and baked goods, is now being exposed. What you’re actually paying for — and consuming — may be surprising.

Cellulose is virgin wood pulp that has been processed and manufactured to different lengths for functionality, though use of it and its variant forms (cellulose gum, powdered cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, etc.) is deemed safe for human consumption, according to the FDA, which regulates most food industry products. The government agency sets no limit on the amount of cellulose that can be used in food products meant for human consumption. The USDA, which regulates meats, has set a limit of 3.5% on the use of cellulose, since fiber in meat products cannot be recognized nutritionally.

“As commodity prices continue to rally and the cost of imported materials impacts earnings, we expect to see increasing use of surrogate products within food items. Cellulose is certainly in higher demand and we expect this to continue,” Michael A. Yoshikami, chief investment strategist at YCMNet Advisors, told TheStreet.

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