May 26

- Jim Rickards: “It Could Be A Failure To Deliver Physical Gold,” “Physical Gold Is Disappearing, There’s A Mountain of Paper Gold. . . . So A Failure to Deliver Could Cause Panic Buying of Gold.” (InvestmentWatch, May 23, 2014):

And what might be the first snowflake to move? 

“It could be a failure to deliver physical gold,” Rickards suggested. “Physical gold is disappearing, there’s a mountain of paper gold. . . . So a failure to deliver could cause panic buying of gold.”

http://www.moneynews.com/StreetTalk/James-Rickards-Dennis-Kneale-Financial-Crisis-Economy/2014/05/20/id/572264/?ns_mail_uid=33506595&ns_mail_job=1570212_05222014&promo_code=crvzhkqc

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May 26


YouTube Added: 24.05.2013

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Apr 15

- Why Is Gold Crashing? (ZeroHedge, April 15, 2013):

Gold Crashes Most in 30 Years … What Does It Really Mean?

Gold has fallen off a cliff.   It has fallen faster than at any time in the last 30 years. Continue reading »

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Feb 17

- Currency Wars Are Trade Wars (Azizonomics, Feb 16, 2013):

Paul Krugman is all for currency wars, but not trade wars:

First of all, what people think they know about past currency wars isn’t actually true. Everyone uses some combination phrase like “protectionism and competitive devaluation” to describe the supposed vicious circle of the 1930s, but as Barry Eichengreen has pointed out many times, these really don’t go together. If country A and country B engage in a tit-for-tat of tariffs, the end result is restricted trade; if they each try to push their currency down, the end result is at worst to leave everyone back where they started.

And in reality the stuff that’s now being called “currency wars” is almost surely a net plus for the world economy. In the 1930s this was because countries threw off their golden fetters — they left the gold standard and this freed them to pursue expansionary monetary policies. Today that’s not the issue; but what Japan, the US, and the UK are doing is in fact trying to pursue expansionary monetary policy, with currency depreciation as a byproduct.

There is a serious intellectual error here, typical of much of the recent discussion of this issue. A currency war is by definition a low-level form of a trade war because currencies are internationally traded commodities. The intent (and there is much circumstantial evidence to suggest that Japan at least is acting with mercantilist intent, but that is another story for another day) is not relevant — currency depreciation is currency depreciation and still has the same effects on creditors and trade partners, whatever the claimed intent. Continue reading »

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Feb 09

- Currency Wars Often Lead to Trade Wars … Which In Turn Can Devolve Into Hot Wars (ZeroHedge, Feb 8, 2013):

Currency War → Trade War → Hot War?

According to numerous high-level insiders, the global currency war is accelerating: Continue reading »

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Aug 16


YouTube

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