Jun 21

ashwagandha
Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera). Ashwagandha root is a herb of the ages. It is the ‘ginseng’ of Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional medicine of India and is considered an ‘adaptogen’, a term used to describe herbs that improve physical energy and athletic ability, increase immunity to colds and infections and increase sexual capacity and fertility. For more information on ashwagandha see the articles down below.

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Thirty-second & thirty-third donation in 2016.

Infinite Unknown reader S.C. donated $50.

Infinite Unknown reader V.S. donated €30.

Thank you for your support!

Very much needed and appreciated.

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Donations in June: $55, £50, €30, $10 (AUD) Continue reading »

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Jun 18

valeriana-officinalis
Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) … “nature’s Valium.” (Click on image to enlarge.)

Valerian is used to relieve anxiety, stress, and insomnia. Drink valerian tea, or take it as a supplement, before bedtime, if you suffer from insomnia. For more information on valerian see the article down below.

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Thirty-first donation in 2016.

Infinite Unknown reader D.W. donated $5

Thank you for your continuing support!

Very much needed and appreciated.

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Donations in June: $5, £50, $10 (AUD) Continue reading »

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May 17

Gotu-Kola
Gotu kola (Centella asiatica) has been used to treat many conditions for thousands of years in India, China, and Indonesia. Centella asiatica has been used as a medicine in the Ayurvedic tradition of India (for thousands of years) and is listed in the historic ‘Sushruta Samhita’, an ancient Indian medical text. In China, known as gotu kola, it is one of the reported “miracle elixirs of life” known over 2000 years ago. Its Chinese name means “fountain of youth.” Gotu kola activates the release of  brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that acts like fertilizer for your brain encouraging new brain cell formation. It takes a few weeks for gotu kola’s effects to kick in and it seems to work by encouraging dendrite branching, increasing brain plasticity and communication between brain cells. Gotu kola also increases nerve growth factor (NGF) which stimulates the growth of new nerve cells and safeguards existing ones. It is very easy to grow and tastes quite good. For more info on gotu kola see articles down below.

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Twenty-sixth donation in 2016.

Infinite Unknown reader A.K. donated $10 (AUD)

Thank you for your continuing support!

Very much needed and appreciated.

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Donations in May: $55, £25, $10 (AUD)

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May 19

(Raw) cashew nuts are very high in tryptophan.


Five foods that can treat insomnia and improve sleep (Natural News, May 17, 2014):

According to the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, nearly 1 in 10 adults in the United States suffers from insomnia. Although most of these people suffer from short-term insomnia, many of them also suffer from chronic insomnia (i.e., difficulty falling or staying asleep for more than six months). Such sleep deprivation can significantly decrease the quality of one’s life.

While stress related to work and family remains the number one cause of insomnia, eating the wrong foods — such as those rich in sugar, caffeine, gluten or polyunsaturated fat — can also contribute to insomnia. Therefore, improving one’s diet is an important first step toward ending insomnia, especially if one favors foods that are known to improve sleep. Continue reading »

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Aug 30

Nearly 9 million Americans are destroying their health.


Sleepless in the states: Nearly 9 million pop pills for shut-eye (NBC News, Aug 29, 2013):

Desperate for rest in a frenzied world, at least 8.6 million Americans take prescription sleeping pills to catch some Zzzs, according to the first federal health study to focus on actual use.

Between 2005 and 2010, about 4 percent of U.S. adults aged 20 and older popped popular prescription drugs such as Lunesta and Ambien in the previous month, say government researchers who tracked 17,000 people to their homes and peered into their medicine cabinets.

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Oct 03

MUST-SEE!!!



YouTube Added: 31.07.2012

Description:

ICAACT was given an exclusive interview with Dr. Barrie Trower, a true British gentlemen and hero, who has spent many years fighting for humanity.

After the meeting our respect and admiration for him rose to new heights.

During the two days of interview, we touched on many different topics, but the main theme was the abuse of microwaves as a secret and covert stealth weapon, that has been around for at least 50-60 years. This type of weapon has taken many different forms over the years and it is still used in many different types of targeting, even to the point of death around the world.

We started the Interview with basic knowledge about microwaves and how they influence the human body and mind. From there we went on to cover Dr. Barrie Trower’s long career, and finally we went into they abuse of microwave weapons and what can be done to protect against them.

The Interview was filmed on May the 1st and 2nd, 2012.

More of the Interview with Dr. Barrie Trower to come at:

WWW.ICAACT.ORG


YouTube Added: 24.11.2011

Description:

A condensed version of an interview with Barrie Trower In November 2010. Barrie Trower is a former Royal Navy microwave weapons expert and former cold-war captured spy debriefer for the UK Intelligence Services. Mr Trower is a conscionable whistle-blower who lectures around the world on hidden dangers from every-day microwave technologies such as mobile-phones and WiFi.

Women and children are most susceptible.

Barrie Trower Talks with Victims of Non-Consensual Microwave and EMF Experimentation and Testing

YouTube Added: 26.06.2012

Description:

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Jul 27

At a recent conference for some of the area’s leading neurologists, San Francisco physicist Norbert Schuff captured his colleagues’ attention when he presented colorful brain images of U.S. soldiers who had returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and were diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

The yellow areas, Schuff explained during his presentation at the city’s Veterans Affairs Medical Center, showed where the hippocampus, which plays major roles in short-term memory and emotions, had atrophied. The red swatches marked hyperfusion – increased blood flow – in the prefrontal cortex, the region responsible for conflict resolution and decision-making. Compared with a soldier without the affliction, the PTSD brain had lost 5 to 10 percent of its gray matter volume, indicating yet more neuron damage.

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