Whole Foods pushes TOXIC blood-clotting canola oil in more than 50% of their packaged products and at the prepared food bar

… and canola oil does enormous damage to your liver!!!

Whole Foods pushes TOXIC blood-clotting canola oil in more than 50% of their packaged products and at the prepared food bar:

The slogan on the Whole Foods website says, “Eat real food.” Sure. Then at the top of the home page they claim, “We’re growing something good.” Really? Since when is rapeseed good? Most of the signature Whole Foods brand “365” products contain rapeseed oil (also known as Canadian Low Acid Oil or “canola” for short). All canola oil needs to be thrown under the bus with every other blood-clogging “food stuff” product created in a laboratory, including margarine and genetically modified soybean, corn and palm oils.

Most canola is chemically extracted using hexane, a highly flammable and carcinogenic solvent that’s a constituent of gasoline. Yep, gasoline. Why? Rapeseed oil stinks and is toxic to all animals, including humans, so the crooks and scoundrels at the FDA had to approve a process to deodorize the funk and slide rapeseed under the radar of intelligent U.S. consumers (and the not-so-smart ones too). This process completely destroys the omega-3s and creates trans fats. Everybody and his brother knows the evil and destructive qualities of trans fats by now. Even if canola oil is “expeller-pressed” and organic, it still coagulates in your blood like margarine and beef fat.

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Farmland Has Biggest 1-Year Value Jump Since 1980

Farmland has biggest 1-year value jump since 1980 (Denver Post, Nov. 15, 2011):

OMAHA, Neb.—The average value of farmland in several Midwestern and Western states grew 25 percent over the past year in the biggest one-year jump in at least three decades.

The increase reported Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City​, Mo., reflects current low interest rates and a healthy farm economy. But the higher land values will make farming more expensive.

“It makes it difficult for early farmers or farmers who want to expand their operation,” Nebraska Farm Bureau President Keith Olsen said. “The other big concern is that as ag values go up, property taxes are going up.”

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