German Conventional Turbine Producer Siemens To Slash 6900 Workers Worldwide Due To “Energiewende”

German Conventional Turbine Producer Siemens To Slash 6900 Workers Worldwide Due To “Energiewende”:

The Swiss online SRF public television site here reports that German power engineering giant Siemens plans to eliminate some 6900 employees, half of them in Germany. Hit will be the conventional power plant and electric drive systems branch.

German energy sector in turmoil

The SRF writes that the power plant branch “is suffering due to the Energiewende“, Germany’s attempted transition to renewable energies. This branch alone will see 6100 job reductions. Turbine plants in Görlitz, Leipzig, Offenbach, Erfurt, Erlangen, Berlin and Mülheim (Ruhr) will be impacted. The announcement just before the start of the Christmas holiday season has angered trade unionists.

The Handelsblatt here reports that some of the impacted engineering workers are “in shock and in tears” over the news. Protests and strikes have been announced.

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Wall Street Journal Calls Merkel’s Energiewende “A Meltdown” Involving “Astronomical Costs”

Wall Street Journal Calls Merkel’s Energiewende “A Meltdown” Involving “Astronomical Costs”:

t an accurate, concise assessment of how Germany’s “Energiewende” (transition away from fossil and nuclear energies over to green energies) has been faring so far. It’s grade? I’d interpret it as an F for failure.

Quickly turning into a huge embarrassment

Once seen as “a paragon of green energy virtue“, the Energiewende is nothing like it was sold to be by green energy hucksters. In fact things have gotten so bad that we can expect activists to grow totally silent on Germany’s Energiewende as its failure becomes glaring and embarrassing.

The WSJ editorial boards reminds readers that Germany is not even going to come close to meeting it’s 2020 or 2030 targets, despite the hundreds of billions of euros committed to the project so far.

No greenhouse gas reductions in 9 years

The truth is that the lion’s share of the country’s greenhouse gas reductions happened right after 1990 when free market principles were implemented to revamp totally run-down Communist East Germany. Yet since the mass state intervention that is the Energiewende, Germany’s reductions have ground to a halt. In reality the country — under Merkel’s leadership — has not seen its emissions of greenhouse gases fall since the end of the last decade, 2009! Read here.

“Astronomical costs”

By any measure this is an astonishing failure of Communist dimensions. The WSJ editorial board writes of “astronomical costs” in return for nothing.

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The Boy Genius Tackling Energy’s Toughest Problem

The Boy Genius Tackling Energy’s Toughest Problem:

In the past year or so an unorthodox think-tank called Helena has been quietly bringing together an eclectic cross-section of brilliant individuals (mostly bright-eyed millennials) with ambitious goals. They’re focusing on the world’s biggest and most insurmountable problems: climate change and global security issues such as artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, and nuclear proliferation. The elite and edgy group includes Nobel laureates, Hollywood stars, technology entrepreneurs, human rights activists, Fortune-list executives, a North Korean refugee, and more, but one of Helena’s most unique members is undoubtedly the 23-year old nuclear physicist Taylor Wilson, once known as “the boy who played with fusion”.

Taylor Wilson garnered international attention from the science world in 2008 when he became the youngest person in history to produce nuclear fusion at just 14 years old, building a reactor capable of smashing atoms in a plasma core at over 500 million degrees Fahrenheit—40 times hotter than the core of the sun—in his parents’ garage. And this all happened after he built a bomb at the age of 10. As a child in Texarkana, Arkansas, Taylor became infatuated with nuclear science after trysts with biology, genetics and chemistry. At age 11, while his classmates were playing with Easy-Bake Ovens, Wilson was taking his crack at building a particle accelerator in an effort to makes homemade radioisotopes.

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Engineering Professor Believes German ‘Energiewende’ Close To Death As Inadequacies Become Glaring

Engineering Professor Believes German ‘Energiewende’ Close To Death As Inadequacies Become Glaring:

Just a few years ago, no party dared to express doubts over the Energiewende (Germany’s transition to green energies), or to question it for fear of being accused of environmental blasphemy and treason. But as the technical and economic problems of the Energiewende become ever more glaring, people and politicians are now speaking up.

One Germany engineering professor, Dr. Ing. Hans-Günter Appel, is now asking if the project “is near the end

So far Germany has installed some 100,000 MW of wind and solar capacity, more than enough to more than supply the country during a windy and sunny day. But unfortunately the sun doesn’t shine 24 hours a day and the wind often stops blowing, sometimes for days and even weeks. They cannot be relied on. At times these two source of energy put out almost zero power.

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Germany: Wind industry “threatening to implode” as subsidies end wiping out half or more of new plants

German wind industry “threatening to implode” as subsidies end wiping out half or more of new plants:

In Germany as 20 years of wind subsidies comes to an end in 2020, half to three quarters of the industry may disappear.

So many parallels with Australia. The Germans have had wind subsidies for 20 years, but even after two decades of support, the industry is still not profitable on a stand-alone basis. In 2016, some 4600MW of new wind plants were installed, but that may drop to one quarter as much by 2019 as subsidies shrink. According to Pierre Gosselin (August 31st, 2017) there are more wind protests, electricity prices are “skyrocketing” and “the grid has become riddled with inefficiencies and has become increasingly prone to grid collapses from unstable power feed in.”

Pierre Gosslin writes that “Germany is more in the green energy retreat mode”.

German flagship business daily “Handelsblatt” reported … how Germany’s wind energy market is now threatening to implode and as a result thousands of jobs are at risk. José Luis Blanco, CEO of German wind energy giant Nordex, blames the market chaos on “policymakers changing the rules“. Subsidies have been getting cut back substantially. The problem, Blanco says, is that worldwide green energy subsidies are being capped and wind parks as a result are no longer looking profitable to investors. The Handelsblatt writes that “things have never been this bad“.

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Australia: More than 120 Victorian electricity and gas connections cut off every day

More than 120 Victorian electricity and gas connections cut off every day:

… 

Energy companies reported disconnecting residential power and gas 46,122 times in the previous financial year.

Victorians raised the issue with the ombudsman 3411 times in 2016-17.

H/t reader kevin a.

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Southeast Asia is planning 400 new coal power plants — what does that mean?

Southeast Asia is planning 400 new coal power plants — what does that mean?:

Southeast Asia is one of the fastest developing regions in the world.

Electricity demand in 2035 is projected to increase by 83% from 2011 levels, with many countries in the region still pursuing new coal-fired power plants, while lagging far behind China and India in scaling up renewable energy.

Among developed countries, only Japan and South Korea continue stand out as the only ones eyeing a coal power expansion, in direct conflict with climate commitments and concerns about public health.

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Why Is Asia Returning to Coal?

Why Is Asia Returning to Coal?:

Just a few short years ago, few would have dared to predict that coal could have a future in the energy policies of emerging and developed countries alike. Yet the fossil fuel is undergoing an unexpected renaissance in Asia, buoyed by technical breakthroughs and looming questions about squaring development with energy security.

For Japan, coal has emerged as the best alternative to replacing its 54 nuclear reactors, which are deeply unpopular with the population and seen as symbols of devastation after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster six years ago. Mindful of the public mood, the government of Shinzo Abe has completely given up on the country’s dream of nuclear self-sufficiency, and pulled the plug in December on the $8.5 billion experimental reactor project at Monju. On February 1, the government pledged to decommission all reactors and replace them with 45 new coal-fired power plants equipped with the latest clean coal technology. In this, Tokyo seeks to achieve two overreaching goals: preserve its energy security and stay on course to fulfill the obligations set forth by the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement.

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Leading German Economics Professor Calls Germany’s Energiewende An Energy Policy Calamity

Leading German Economics Professor Calls Germany’s Energiewende An Energy Policy Calamity:

In a recently released video interview by journalist Jörg Rehmann, University of Magdeburg economics professor Joachim Weimann explains why renewable energies have been a terrible idea for Germany so far.

Recently a high ranking expert commission set up by the German government even sharply criticized the German Energiewende (transition to renewable energies), saying it was leading the country down the wrong path. But as Prof. Weimann explains, the commission’s results fell on deaf ears.

Weimann starts the interview by explaining that the target of the Energiewende is to replace carbon-dioxide-emitting fossil fuels in order to protect our climate. One instrument used to achieve that target was Cap and Trade, in combination with the Energiewende, which Weimann says has not worked well at all. The U. of Magdeburg professor says that every cut that gets achieved in Germany gets offset elsewhere, and so net CO2 gets saved at all.

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Major Blow to ‘Clean Coal’ as 11- Year, $7.5 Billion Flagship Project Fails

Major Blow to ‘Clean Coal’ as 11- Year, $7.5 Billion Flagship Project Fails:

In a major blow to proponents of “clean coal” technology, Southern Co., parent company of Mississippi Power, announced in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing Wednesday that it’s throwing in the towel on efforts to generate electricity from coal and will instead use only natural gas at its flagship Kemper County, Mississippi power plant.

The project, which relied on a “gasifier” to turn a cheap and common grade of coal into fuel, is over, at least for now, Southern said.

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