Sep 08

CNN admits vaccinations spread disease, as dengue vaccine creates more outbreak cases

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Oct 16

.yellow-fever-mosquito-los-angeles

Yellow fever mosquitoes spread fear of deadly viruses in Los Angeles (RT, Oct 15, 2014):

Ebola may not be the only cause of fear to arrive in the US recently. Yellow fever mosquitoes ‒ which can transmit dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever itself ‒ have been found in the Los Angeles region, officials announced Wednesday.

These mosquitoes can spread the three deadly tropical viruses to humans through their bites. They were found Oct. 7 and 8 in Commerce and Pico Rivera, respectively, according to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District (GLACVCD) and San Gabriel Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District (SGVMVCD). Continue reading »

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Oct 11

China’s Own “Ebola” Claims Another 1826 Cases (ZeroHedge, Oct 10, 2014):

While Ebola is getting all the headlines, China is dealing with “the worst outbreak in decades” of Dengue Fever. As ITAR-TASS reports, the outbreak of the mosquito-borne disease in China has killed six people and infected more than 27,200 according to Chinese health officials. Just today, the epidemic has infected 1,826 more people in the Guangdong Province alone. But it’s not just China, last month Malaysia reported that dengue fever deaths had more than tripled in 2014, while Japan recently saw its first outbreak in 70 years with many contracting the illness at Tokyo’s popular Yoyogi Park. Continue reading »

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Sep 17

GMO-mosquitoes-released-into-the-wild

Dengue fever outbreak spreads in Japan – just in time for GM mosquitoes and experimental vaccines (Natural News, Sep 15, 2014):

Dozens of people in Japan have contracted a potentially deadly illness that hasn’t been seen in the country for nearly 70 years. Reports indicate that visitors to Yoyogi Park, one of Tokyo’s most popular leisure spots, have been falling ill with dengue fever, a mosquito-transmitted illness that mostly occurs in the more tropical regions of Southeast Asia but now appears to be on the move.

Local officials closed the park after some 55 people, according to USA Today, fell ill with the disease, which can lead to severe fever, joint pain and chronic headaches. In more extreme cases, dengue can cause persistent bleeding that, in a worst-case scenario, results in death.
Continue reading »

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Sep 10

Researchers Offer Strange Answer to Anticipated Dengue Spikes Following Vaccine (Activist Post, Sep 9, 2014):

Researchers indeed continue to develop vaccines for tropical, mosquito-vectored diseases like dengue fever, which affects 50 million people per year.

There are no commercially available vaccines for the virus – yet. But, they’ve run into a big problem.

Researchers watching vaccine development caution that there will be initial disease spikes with its use. There’s no argument about this observation. In fact, it’s admitted.

But the explanation to ward off panic and ensure that people in other countries will take that future risk, is beyond a mental back flip. Continue reading »

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Jul 09

Flashback:

Florida Scientists Prepare To Release Hundreds Of Thousands Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

Millions Of GMO Mosquitoes Released Without Risk Assessment Or Oversight

Australia: GMO Mosquitoes Released Into The Wild

Bill Gates Spends $1 Million On Laser Defence System – To Repel Mosquitoes

GMO Mosquitos Engineered To Kill – Their Own Children – RELEASED In Brazil, Cayman, Islands And Malaysia

Scientist Investigating How Mosquitoes Transmit Diseases Dies From Ingested Cyanide

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Funds Sweat-Triggered Vaccines

Gates Foundation: Funding for a proposal to turn mosquitos into ‘flying syringes’ delivering vaccines

What could possibly go wrong?


gm-mosquitoes

Brazil Announces Dengue Fever Emergency in GM Mosquito Trials Region (Sustainable Pulse, July 8, 2014):

Civil society groups today expressed alarm at an increase in dengue incidence, leading to an emergency decree, in a town in Brazil where releases of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes are taking place.

The promise was to create genetically modified mosquitoes that would end dengue, but results from field trials conducted in Bahia, Brazil have not been published to date and did not evaluate the relation between Aedes aegypti mosquito populations and the occurrence of dengue [1]. Nevertheless, the Brazilian regulator Comissão Técnica Nacional de Biossegurança (CTNBio) recently gave the green light to the commercialization of the technology proposed by Moscamed Brazil in partnership with the English company Oxitec and the Universidade de São Paulo.

The Brazilian press had welcomed the new weapon to combat dengue but missed the information that Jacobina’s mayor, a locality where the trials took place, issued a decree in February 2014 renewing the state of emergency “due to the abnormal situation characterized as a biological disaster of dengue epidemic.” [2]. Before that, Moscamed had announced 81% and 100% reduction in the number of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in at least two localities of Jacobina, claiming that this meant the experiments were a success [3]. According to Oxitec, pilot-scale releases started in the north-west of Jacobina in June 2013 and the programme will roll out across the entire city over two or three years [4]. Continue reading »

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Oct 23

Mosquito That Carries Yellow Fever, Dengue Spotted In California (Medical Daily, Oct 19, 2013):

Aedes aegypti, the species of mosquito that transmits deadly tropical diseases including yellow fever and the dengue virus, has made its way through California’s Central Valley to the Bay Area this year.

The aggressive mosquito, which is dark with white markings banding its legs, was first spotted in Madera and Clovis in June, followed by Fresno and the Bay Area city of San Mateo in August, according to the Sacramento Bee. Unlike other mosquitoes, the Aedes aegypti prefers biting people rather than animals and bites at all hours of the day, not just at night. Controlling the spread of these mosquitoes is difficult since they need as little as a teaspoon of water to lay their eggs, meaning they could easily breed in anyone’s yard.

Fortunately, none of the mosquitoes trapped by vector control groups have been shown to carry any diseases. The possibility for disease transmission still exists, albeit a small one, as cases of dengue and yellow fever are incredibly rare in the state. To infect a person with these diseases, the Aedes aegypti mosquito must bite an infected person first.

Continue reading »

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Dec 10

See also:

Millions Of GMO Mosquitoes Released Without Risk Assessment Or Oversight

Bill Gates Spends $1 Million On Laser Defence System – To Repel Mosquitoes

Scientist Investigating How Mosquitoes Transmit Diseases Dies From Ingested Cyanide

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Funds Sweat-Triggered Vaccines

Gates Foundation: Funding for a proposal to turn mosquitos into ‘flying syringes’ delivering vaccines


Florida scientists prepare to release hundreds of thousands of genetically modified mosquitoes (RT, Dec 7, 2012):

Hundreds of thousands of mutated mosquitoes could soon be unleashed in Florida, but don’t worry: scientists say they have a plan.

It might sound like something out of a low-budget horror film, but the US Food and Drug Administration really is considering whether or not they should allow scientists to send thousands upon thousands of genetically altered insects into the wild.

Continue reading »

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Nov 12

Criminals of the worst kind!

Alternative medicine can heal both dengue fever and malaria.


Genetically altered mosquitoes thwart dengue spreaders


No offspring for you (Image: CDC/Phanie/Rex Features)

An outdoor trial of mosquitoes genetically engineered to sabotage Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which spread dengue fever, has been declared a success by scientists in the field.

The trial is first time genetically modified mosquitoes have been released in the wild. The strategy promises to provide a new weapon against dengue, a disease that infects 50 million people annually and kills 25,000. In the past year, dengue has reappeared in the US for the first time in 65 years, and in southern Europe.

By the end of the six-month trial on a 16-hectare plot, populations of the native insects, which spread the dengue virus had plummeted.

“It’s a proof of principle, that it works,” says Angela Harris of the Mosquito Control and Research Unit on the Caribbean island of Grand Cayman, where the trial took place. The MCRU conducted the trial with Oxitec, the company in Oxford, UK, that bred the GM mosquitoes. Continue reading »

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Oct 15

PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia (AP) – Malaysia could be the first country in Asia to use genetically modified mosquitoes to battle a rise in dengue fever, government authorities said Monday.

The program calls for genetically engineered male mosquitoes to be released into the wild that would mate with females and produce offspring that live shorter lives, thus curbing the population.

Malaysian scientists say laboratory test trials have made them optimistic.

“It is a pilot project, and hopefully it will work,” Prime Minister Najib Razak told reporters on the sidelines of a World Health Organization conference in Malaysia.

Dengue fever, spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is common in Asia and Latin America. Symptoms include high fever, joint pains and nausea, but in severe cases, it can lead to internal bleeding, liver enlargement, circulatory shutdown and death. There is no known cure or vaccine.

Efforts to urge Malaysians to keep neighborhoods clean and destroy stagnant sources of water — which are mosquito breeding grounds — have failed, and “innovative ways” are needed to combat dengue, Najib said.

In Malaysia, the number of dengue-linked deaths totaled 117 between January and early October — a 65 percent surge from last year, according to Health Ministry statistics. Dengue infections overall increased 17 percent from last year to more than 37,000 cases.

Malaysian authorities plan to release between 2,000 and 3,000 genetically modified mosquitoes in two areas, said Lim Chua Leng, a Health Ministry official. The plan, which cannot be undertaken without Cabinet approval, would be the first such release of genetically modified mosquitoes in Asia to combat dengue.

Continue reading »

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Apr 18

Think U.S. health authorities have never conducted outrageous medical experiments on children, women, minorities, homosexuals and inmates? Think again: This timeline, originally put together by Dani Veracity (a NaturalNews reporter), has been edited and updated with recent vaccination experimentation programs in Maryland and New Jersey. Here’s what’s really happening in the United States when it comes to exploiting the public for medical experimentation:

(1845 – 1849) J. Marion Sims, later hailed as the “father of gynecology,” performs medical experiments on enslaved African women without anesthesia. These women would usually die of infection soon after surgery. Based on his belief that the movement of newborns’ skull bones during protracted births causes trismus, he also uses a shoemaker’s awl, a pointed tool shoemakers use to make holes in leather, to practice moving the skull bones of babies born to enslaved mothers (Brinker).

(1895)

New York pediatrician Henry Heiman infects a 4-year-old boy whom he calls “an idiot with chronic epilepsy” with gonorrhea as part of a medical experiment (“Human Experimentation: Before the Nazi Era and After”).

(1896)

Dr. Arthur Wentworth turns 29 children at Boston’s Children’s Hospital into human guinea pigs when he performs spinal taps on them, just to test whether the procedure is harmful (Sharav).

(1906)

Harvard professor Dr. Richard Strong infects prisoners in the Philippines with cholera to study the disease; 13 of them die. He compensates survivors with cigars and cigarettes. During the Nuremberg Trials, Nazi doctors cite this study to justify their own medical experiments (Greger, Sharav).

(1911)

Dr. Hideyo Noguchi of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research publishes data on injecting an inactive syphilis preparation into the skin of 146 hospital patients and normal children in an attempt to develop a skin test for syphilis. Later, in 1913, several of these children’s parents sue Dr. Noguchi for allegedly infecting their children with syphilis (“Reviews and Notes: History of Medicine: Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War”).

(1913)

Medical experimenters “test” 15 children at the children’s home St. Vincent’s House in Philadelphia with tuberculin, resulting in permanent blindness in some of the children. Though the Pennsylvania House of Representatives records the incident, the researchers are not punished for the experiments (“Human Experimentation: Before the Nazi Era and After”).

(1915)

Dr. Joseph Goldberger, under order of the U.S. Public Health Office, produces Pellagra, a debilitating disease that affects the central nervous system, in 12 Mississippi inmates to try to find a cure for the disease. One test subject later says that he had been through “a thousand hells.” In 1935, after millions die from the disease, the director of the U.S Public Health Office would finally admit that officials had known that it was caused by a niacin deficiency for some time, but did nothing about it because it mostly affected poor African-Americans. During the Nuremberg Trials, Nazi doctors used this study to try to justify their medical experiments on concentration camp inmates (Greger; Cockburn and St. Clair, eds.). Continue reading »

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