Jun 06

From the article:

“It is like a textbook case in government gone mad.

They have stolen the retirement accounts, devalued the currency, and put capital controls in place. There are trade controls so that people can’t import necessities into the country, but instead, have to manufacture them locally, with the government giving monopolies to their friends. They have price controls, which force the local supermarkets to not raise their prices. This will ultimately lead to shortages. And there are already shortages of certain items. They didn’t like an opposition newspaper, so they nationalized the newsprint manufacturing industry. In fact, just about every single thing that you could do to screw up a country, they have done. It is comical to see the extremes they have gone to. For example, in Argentina, if you publish an inflation statistic that differs from of the official government numbers, you could be hit with a $100,000 fine. I had never heard of this anywhere else – except maybe in communist Russia. They are really completely out of control and the country is spinning off into la-la-land.”

Flashback:

Inflation, Hyperinflation and Real Estate (Price Collaps)

Argentina’s Economic Collapse (Full Documentary)


Lessons from Economic Crises in Argentina (Casey Research, June 5, 2013):

Nick Giambruno: Joining me now is David Galland, the managing director of Casey Research. His internationalization story, which involved moving his life and his family from the US to Argentina, was recently featured in Internationalize Your Assets, a free online video from Casey Research. He is perfectly suited to help us better understand some of the important lessons in internationalization that Argentina offers. Welcome, David.

David Galland: Nice to be here.

Nick: First, why don’t you give us a little background about the Argentine people and how they have learned to deal with their government and recurring financial crises? Continue reading »

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May 09

All Chinese are equal, but some Chinese are more equal than others.


Communism For Some, $815 Million For Others: How Mao’s Granddaughter “Greatly Leapt Forward” To Untold Riches (ZeroHedge, May 9, 2013):

For a country, whose founder Chairman Mao once upon a time envisioned great wealth equality for all and a communist utopia, things sure have had a very capitalist ending. Perhaps nowhere is this more visible than in Mao’s lineage itself, where we find that the granddaughter of Mao, Kong Dongmei, managed to rise above the great unwashed mass of egalitarianism, and ended up just slightly more equal as a result of the Great Leap Forward, with a personal fortune amounting to $815 million according to New Fortune, a Chinese financial magazine. But it is not so much the realization that the occupation of politics is one grand lie (second perhaps only to economics) and where preaching equality for all is merely a means to achieve great wealth for yourself, but that the 40 year old descendant of the Chairman, with her wealth of nearly $1 billion, is merely the 242nd richest person in China, which means there are over 200 billionaires in the country, the bulk of whom we can only imagine are descendants of the original “communist” founders of the country.

From AP:

Kong is the grand-daughter of Mao and his third wife He Zizhen. In 2001 she founded a book store in Beijing selling publications about Mao and promoting “Red Culture” after studying at the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

In 2011, Kong married Chen, who controls an insurance company, an auction house and a courier firm, after they had maintained an extramarital relationship for 15 years, according to the magazine, which cited other Chinese media reports.

The couple have two daughters and a son, said New Fortune — likely to be a violation of China’s one-child policy.

The locals, attuned to flagrant examples of hypocrisy, were not exactly delighted with the revelation: Continue reading »

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Apr 10

Survivor Of Communist Cuba Defends 2nd Amendment (ALT-MARKET, April 9, 2013):

In the past, I have corresponded with a few survivors of communist despotism, and what I have found is that most if not all immigrants that actually lived in a collectivized state with a disarmed population fight harder to defend the U.S. Constitution than half of the people who were actually born here.  There are a lot of overgrown children in this country today who have NO understanding of the consequences of the path our society has been set on.  They look to big government to take care of them because they are too lazy or apathetic to do it for themselves.  They look to big government to protect them because they are cowardly and have no concept of self-defense.  They look to big government as an attack dog that they can hide behind when they seek to impose their ideology and zealotry on the rest of us.  They bow down to big government because they are afraid of becoming the “nail that sticks out”.  They submit to authoritarianism because they have no honor, and, no sense of appreciation when it comes to the concept of true liberty.

These sad but useful idiots within our population love to argue in the name of the state, constantly claiming that the ongoing restrictions of our individual freedoms and constitutional rights are “for the greater good” of our society as a whole.  They insist that even though the political measures being taken in the U.S. today are almost identical to those implemented in communist police states, this time “things will be different”.  This time, the collectivists will “get it right”.  Not surprising, though, is the fact that the vast majority of those that call for rights restrictions and socialized mega-government have never actually lived under the kind of system they are demanding.  They have absolutely NO idea what it is really like, nor do they ever attempt to learn from those who comprehend full well.

Some people know.  Some people have lived it.  Some people have experienced the consequences first hand.  And, for anyone with the intelligence to listen, this is what they have to say about gun control and the path to tyranny…

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Aug 20


YouTube Added: 15.08.2012

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Aug 16

Farage Blasts Communist Europe And Leaders “Living In Noddy-Land” (ZeroHedge, Aug 15, 2012):

Nigel Farage, looking tanned and refreshed, is back and as he tells FOX Business in this brief clip “nothing has changed” from his views of Europe as the Titanic and its unelected officials dragging it down to the depths of the ocean. Citing Mario Monti specifically with his concerns over allowing politicians to ‘decide’ anything he notes the leader’s demeanor is “We must not let democracy interfere with our great Grand Project.” With European GDP negative, and group-hugs all around as Europeans are herded towards a European social state, Farage analogizes that “we are living in Noddyland” where economic reality and day-to-day life are as distant as they could be as he warns that they are becoming part of something that is increasingly resembling Communism. He dismisses the growing belief that “the state and government creates jobs” noting that “it doesn’t, it destroys them!” With two wrongs (Spain ad Italy) not making a right; Farage is clear that breaking up the EU is necessary now and it is critical to recognize that “you don’t get something for nothing” as Europe is increasingly de-industrialized.


YouTube

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Jun 19

For your information.



YouTube Added: 11.06.2012

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Sep 12

fidel-castro
Cuba’s leader Fidel Castro greets students before delivering a speech outside Havana’s University in Havana, Cuba, Friday, Sept. 3, 2010. Castro dusted off his military fatigues for the first time since stepping down as president four years ago, a symbolic act in a Communist country where little signals often carry enormous significance.(AP Photo/Javier Galeano) (Javier Galeano – AP)

HAVANA — Cuba’s communist economic model has come in for criticism from an unlikely source: Fidel Castro.

The revolutionary leader told a visiting American journalist and a U.S.-Cuba policy expert that the island’s state-dominated system is in need of change, a rare comment on domestic affairs from a man who has taken pains to steer clear of local issues since illness forced him to step down as president four years ago.

The fact that things are not working efficiently on this cash-strapped Caribbean island is hardly news. Fidel’s brother Raul, the country’s president, has said the same thing repeatedly. But the blunt assessment by the father of Cuba’s 1959 revolution is sure to raise eyebrows.

Jeffrey Goldberg, a national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine, asked Castro if Cuba’s economic system was still worth exporting to other countries, and Castro replied: “The Cuban model doesn’t even work for us anymore,” Goldberg wrote Wednesday in a post on his Atlantic blog.

The Cuban government had no immediate comment on Goldberg’s account.

Julia Sweig, a Cuba expert at the Washington-based Council on Foreign Relations who accompanied Goldberg on the trip, confirmed the Cuban leader’s comment, which he made at a private lunch last week.

She told The Associated Press she took the remark to be in line with Raul Castro’s call for gradual but widespread reform.

“It sounded consistent with the general consensus in the country now, up to and including his brother’s position,” Sweig said.

In general, she said she found the 84-year-old Castro to be “relaxed, witty, conversational and quite accessible.”

“He has a new lease on life, and he is taking advantage of it,” Sweig said.

Castro stepped down temporarily in July 2006 due to a serious illness that nearly killed him.

He resigned permanently two years later, but remains head of the Communist Party. After staying almost entirely out of the spotlight for four years, he re-emerged in July and now speaks frequently about international affairs. He has been warning for weeks of the threat of a nuclear war over Iran.

Continue reading »

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