Jan 14

If you do a ‘neurotropic pathogen search’ and examine the blood of a MS patient at the height of a relapse you may find a virus, bacteria or several of them to be very active and to be the probable cause of the relapse.

Chlamydia pneumoniae is just one of the usual suspects. Measles, herpes simplex & zoster, mumps, borrelia, Epstein-Barr, rubella, cytomegalovirus, diphtheria, staphylococcus, streptococcus clostridium tetani & difficile, scarlet, etc. have been found.

Alternative medicine offers a lot of different strategies to get rid of these critters and get well again.

Why is it that doctors do not want to do a neurotropic pathogen search and the also (recommended) differential blood count to find out what is really going on?


Sep 17, 2012

It’s widely accepted that Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The cause of MS is unknown and there is no cure. But some maverick doctors contend that MS is triggered by an infection which can be treated. It’s believed that a common bacterium, http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/

Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect blood vessels in the brain and spinal cord and ultimately lead to nerve damage. Maryanne Demasi meets the doctors who are at odds with neurologists in proposing that an early diagnosis of MS could be cured with something as simple as antibiotics.

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I had several multiple sclerosis patients and examined their blood under a very good dark field microscope.

My MS patients, just like the cancer patients, had a lot of parasites in their blood. Continue reading »

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