Dec 27

- We Feed Cows Chicken Poop (Mother Jones, Dec 19, 2013):

The practice isn’t just gross, it could spread mad cow disease—and yet the FDA has done nothing to stop it.

This story originally appeared on OnEarth.org.

Anyone who pays even scant attention to where our food comes from is likely aware that some pretty unsavory things happen between the farm and your fork (see this month’s big story in Rolling Stone, for example). But some of these farming methods are more than just unappetizing: they could be deadly. One practice in particular could allow for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, the gruesome and fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as mad cow disease.

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Jun 21

- Alzheimer’s Disease: Deadly Infectious Cause Known and Hidden – Prions (Ed Ward, MD’s Blog, June 21, 2013):

Alzheimer’s Disease: Deadly Infectious Cause Known and Hidden – Prions

Government’s, Corporation’s and Search Engines Deadly Secret: “Alzheimer’s Disease is a Prion Disease.”  http://edwardmd.wordpress.com/2013/06/21/alzheimers-disease-deadly-infectious-cause-known-and-hidden-prions-2/ Original brief article http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EdWard-MD/message/683

Alzheimer’s Disease Is a Prion Disease. A TSE, Transmissable (Transmittable) Spongiform Encephalopathy: Variants, Sub Variants of TSE Prions – Mad Cow Disease – BSE, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, CJD, Creutzfeldt-Jakobs Disease, Kuru, Sheep and Goat Scrapie, Cat – FSE, Elk and Deer – CWD, Chronic Wasting Disease.  There are also ‘inherited’ genes that may cause a small portion of CJD, GSS and FFI.  But, as will be discussed briefly later in the article, may or may not be correct. http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/P/Prions.html


One side is your brain. The other side is your brain on prions.

“Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and is the fifth leading cause among people aged 65 years and over. People aged 85 years and over have a 5.4 times greater risk of dying from Alzheimer’s disease than people aged 75–84 years.

The age-adjusted death rate from Alzheimer’s disease increased by 39 percent from 2000 through 2010 in the United States.” There is a 400% increase expected by 2050. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db116.htm

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Apr 28

- Mad Cow Disease May Infect Through Milk Despite USDA Claims (Natural Society, April 27, 2012):

Following the latest confirmed case of mad cow disease in California, the USDA and the dairy industry alike are struggling to assure consumers that drinking affected milk poses no serious risk to your health. Despite these warnings, some scientists have found research that points to the contrary. In fact, two large studies found that prions — pathogenic agents associated with mad cow disease and other life-threatening conditions — can actually transfer from animal to animal via milk consumption.

One such study, performed by a conglomerate of French, Norwegian, and British researchers, actually observed the presence of prions in sheep milk – the very prions that the USDA says cannot inhabit US dairy. Shockingly, this peer-reviewed study was published back in 2008 in the journal PLoS Pathogens. Why has the USDA not spoken of this study, or even the second study that reached similar conclusions? In case you’re unsure, let’s examine an excerpt from the study authors:

This finding indicates that milk from small ruminants could contribute to the transmission of prion disease between animals. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans associated with milk products from ovine and other dairy species.

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Mar 07

A case of mad cow disease has been found in a dairy cow in Alberta, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed to CBC News on Friday.

The agency said the case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a fatal brain disease, was found on Feb. 18 in a six-year-old dairy cow. The CFIA didn’t plan on making the case public until March 10, even though information about the infected cow was common knowledge in the industry for two weeks, according to The Canadian Press.

The cow has been destroyed, and no part of its carcass entered the human food or animal feed systems.

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Jan 16


Risky business: People who work in abattoirs, slaughterhouses and laboratories could face a higher risk of catching BSE

Mad cow disease can be spread by airborne particles, researchers warn.

And they fear that those who work in abattoirs, slaughterhouses and laboratories could be at risk.

Their study shows prions, the infectious agents which cause BSE and its human form, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, can be dangerous if carried through the air.

In tests, mice who breathed them in developed the brain disease with ‘frightening’ speed and died.

The discovery could also explain why some of the victims in the 1990s were vegetarians.

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