Sep 03

EU’s Poorest Member Country Smacks Down Euro As Bulgaria Refuses To Join Eurozone (ZeroHedge, Sep 3, 2012):

If one needs a shining example of why the days of Europe’s artificial currency are numbered, look no further than the EU’s poorest country which moments ago said “Ne Mersi” to the Eurozone and the European currency. From the WSJ: “Bulgaria, the European Union’s poorest member state and a rare fiscal bright spot for the bloc, has indefinitely frozen long-held plans to adopt the single currency, marking the latest fiscally prudent country to cool its enthusiasm for the embattled currency. Speaking in interviews in Sofia, Prime Minister Boyko Borisov and Finance Minister Simeon Djankov said that the decision to shelve plans to join the currency area, a longtime strategic aim of successive governments in the former communist state, came in response to deteriorating economic conditions and rising uncertainty over the prospects of the bloc, alongside a decisive shift of public opinion in Bulgaria, which is entering its third year of an austerity program. The momentum has shifted in our thinking and among the public…Right now, I don’t see any benefits of entering the euro zone, only costs,” Mr. Djankov said. “The public rightly wants to know who would we have to bailout when we join? It’s too risky for us and it’s also not certain what the rules are and what are they likely to be in one year or two.

When a parasitic technocrat asks to shake your hand, you refuse:

Of course, Bulgaria is right: at this point the only “upside” to new EMU entrants is for the unelected Brussels technocrats, who are now the butt of every possible joke, to demand said countries hand over their middle class’ wealth in order to bailout Greece, Portugal, Ireland, Spain, Italy and all the rest of the “wealthy and developed.” And since. in trader jargon, by not being “long” the euro, Bulgaria is effectively “short” it, expect to hear some rather disparaging statements emanating out of Europe’s insolvent core vis-a-vis the poor nation shortly.

From the WSJ:

Prime Minister Boyko Borisov said concerns had been heightened by growing disputes between policy makers, some of whom back Germany’s call to give priority to fiscal discipline over growth, while others want a more expansionary policy.

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