Mar 06

You’ll find a lot more additional info on chemotherapy down below.

Learn what highly toxic, cancer causing chemical is actually used to treat cancer.


chemotherapy

(Click on image to enlarge.)

A groundbreaking 14-year study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology called “The Contribution of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy to 5-year Survival in Adult Malignancies”.

Read the full study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (Dec. 2004) here (and take a look at those tables at page 3 & 4):

“The Contribution of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy to 5-year Survival in Adult Malignancies” (PDF)

Studied were the 5-year survival rates of chemotherapy on 22 types of cancers in the US and Australia.

154,971 Americans & Australians cancer patients, age 20 and older, were treated with chemotherapy.

The survival of only 3,306 could be ‘credited’ to chemo.

A short info from WebMD:

The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survival in adult malignancies:

Study Results: “The overall contribution of curative and adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survival in adults was estimated to be 2.3% in Australia and 2.1 % in The USA”

Study Conclusion:“As the 5-year survival rate in Australia is now over 60%, it is clear that cytotoxic chemotherapy only makes a minor contribution to cancer survival.To justify the continued funding and availability of drugs used in cytotoxic chemotherapy, a rigorous evaluation of the cost-effectiveness and impact on quality of life is urgently required.”

Chemotherapy contributed on average only 2,1% to the overall survival rate! Continue reading »

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Oct 31

People Who Live Downwind Of Alberta’s Oil And Tar Sands Operations Are Getting Blood Cancer (Climate Progress, Oct 28, 2013):

A new study has found that levels of air pollution downwind of the largest tar sands, oil and gas producing region in Canada rival levels found in the world’s most polluted cities. And that pollution isn’t just dirtying the air — it also could be tied increased incidence of blood cancers in men that live in the area.The study, published last week by researchers from University of California Irvine and the University of Michigan, found levels of carcinogenic air pollutants 1,3-butadiene and benzene spiked in the Fort Saskatchewan area, which is downwind of the oil and tar sands-rich “Industrial Heartland” of Alberta. Airborne levels of 1,3-butadiene were 322 times greater downwind of the Industrial Heartland — which houses more than 40 major chemical, petrochemical and oil and gas facilities — than upwind, while downwind levels of benzene were 51 times greater. Levels of some volatile organic compounds — which, depending on the compound, have been linked to liver, kidney and central nervous system damage as well as cancer — were 6,000 times higher than normal. The area saw concentrations of some chemicals that were higher than levels in Mexico City during the 1990s, when it was the most polluted city on the planet.

Continue reading »

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