Dec 08

And the alternatives are NOT safe either …

Related info:

Parents Shocked To Learn ‘BPA-Free’ Baby Bottles Are Loaded With Other Estrogen Mimickers

Study Finds Bottled Water Leeches 24,000 Chemicals Into Your Body

New Study: BPA Is Deadly To Developing Brains Of Babies In Utero

BPA Substitute Could Spell Trouble: Experiments Show Bisphenol S Also Disrupts Hormone Activity

Study: BPA Leads To Birth & Fertility Defects (… And Is Linked To Diabetes & Breast Cancer)

Bisphenol-A (BPA) Found In Virtually All Canned Foods


plastic-BPA

Research: Bisphenol A (BPA) Causes 100x More Harm Than Previously Imagined (GreenMedInfo, Dec 6, 2014):

A new study reveals just how profoundly misled we are about Bisphenol A and its analogs: they are at least 100x more toxic than we previously imagined.

An alarming new study establishes that the commonly used chemical bisphenol A used in tens of thousands of consumer products, and its lesser known but increasingly prevalent analogs, bisphenol S and F, are several orders of magnitude more disruptive to the endocrine systems of the developing male human fetus than previous toxicological risk assessments were capable of determining.

The new study was published in the journal Fertility and Sterility and titled, “A new chapter in the bisphenol A story: bisphenol S and bisphenol F are not safe alternatives to this compound.” Continue reading »

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Oct 26

From the article:

“No one is sure what is causing the change”

It is caused by substances/chemicals in our food that mimick hormones and by substances/chemicals that can trigger/force hormonal changes in the human body.

Flashback:

The Age of Treason: 1958 Book Exposes Current Chemical Attack on Humanity

Insider Exposed NEW WORLD ORDER Plans In 1969 (MP3 & Transcipt)

So we really know more than just one reason for this.

One reason is BPA:

Food Industry Refuses To Take Out Harmful BPAs

Age 10 The ‘New Norm’ For Puberty In Girls Thanks to Chemicals Like BPA:

Toxic BPA is featured in the vast majority of plastics used commercially today. This chemical has the property of mimicking estrogen when leeched into the body.

More Than 90 Percent Of Canadians Are Contaminated With Bisphenol-A (BPA)

Bisphenol-A (BPA) Found In Virtually All Canned Foods

From the article:

“Some parents are worried that children may be missing out on a normal childhood.”

This criminal society is not only robbing these children of a normal childhood:

Study: BPA Leads To Birth & Fertility Defects (… And Is Linked To Diabetes & Breast Cancer)

Red Alert For Humanity: Chemical Damage Can Be Inherited By Offspring Through Unlimited Generations

How ‘Scientific Poisoners’ Threaten The Future Of Life On Planet Earth

WAR ON HEALTH – The FDA’s Cult of Tyranny (Documentary):

What can you do?

Why You Should Only Eat Organic Food



Some parents are worried that children may be missing out on a normal childhood.

Boys are reaching puberty earlier, says study (Guardian, Oct 20, 2012):

New report by the American Academy of Paediatrics shows that boys as young as nine are showing signs of maturity

The study covered a large sample. It looked at more than 4,000 boys in 41 US states aged six to 16 years. Based on the so-called Tanner stages of development – a technique doctors use to measure stages of puberty – genital changes in boys started around the age of 9 or 10, and pubic hair appeared between age 10 and 11 and a half, on average.

Onset of puberty in girls has fallen by five years since 1920 (Guardian, Oct 21, 2012):

No one is sure what is causing the change

In the late 1980s, Marcia Herman-Giddens was working in a paediatric clinic at Duke University Medical Centre in North Carolina when she noticed a puzzling phenomenon. More and more girls aged eight or nine who visited the clinic had started to sprout pubic hair and breasts. At the time, medical orthodoxy held that the average age of puberty for girls in the west was over 11. The numbers of under-10s that Herman-Giddens was seeing did not fit with this scenario. She began collecting data that eventually produced a study with the American Academy of Pediatrics that studied 17,000 girls and found that the average age of breast-budding among white girls was 9.9 years while for black girls it was 8.8.

The discovery was hugely controversial. Many doctors refused to accept the fact that more and more girls had begun to mature sexually before they had reached the age of 10. “The Lolita syndrome [the prurient fascination with the sexuality of young girls] created a lot of emotional interest,” recalls Herman-Giddens, now at the University of North Carolina. “As a feminist, I wish it didn’t.”

Today most doctors accept that the age of onset of puberty is dropping steadily. Many studies have showed this to be the case for girls, and new research carried out by Herman-Giddens, and published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, has found the same for boys. The age of onset of biological adulthood continues to plunge. Consider the statistics provided by German researchers. They found that in 1860, the average age of the onset of puberty in girls was 16.6 years. In 1920, it was 14.6; in 1950, 13.1; 1980, 12.5; and in 2010, it had dropped to 10.5. Similar sets of figures have been reported for boys, albeit with a delay of around a year.

Continue reading »

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Nov 03

BPA Leads to Fertility Defect in Offspring (Natural Society, Oct. 31, 2011):

Bishphenol a (BPA), the headline-topping chemical commonly found in plastics, cans, and food packaging has been tied to yet another negative condition — adversely affecting male genital development and subsequently targeting fertility rates. If you have been following the latest BPA research, then it should be no surprise to you that BPA has been repeatedly linked to diabetes, breast cancer (with over 130 total studies), hyperactivity and depression, and countless other conditions.

BPA alters Anogenital distance, heavily tied to fertility in men

The study, which involved the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research in Human Reproduction, examined the effect of BPA on Anogenital distance (AGD). AGD is the distance between the genitalia and the anus, and is biologically very important. AGD has been linked to fertility in males, making the affect of BPA on the male reproductive system quite significant. Linked to both semen volume and sperm count, men with an abnormally short AGD (lower than the median around 52 mm (2 in) have seven times the chance of being sub-fertile as compared to those with a longer AGD.

This is particularly startling due to the fact that BPA has been found in 90% of babies’ cord blood.

Researchers examined 153 boys,  56 with parental occupational exposure during pregnancy and 97 without. After factoring in the weight and age of the boys using regular linear regression, the study found that parental occupational exposure to BPA during pregnancy was associated with shortened AGD in male offspring. What this means is that those who were exposed to high levels of BPA during pregnancy were found to birth offspring with AGD defects. But what about those who do not deal with BPA exposure through their occupation?

Continue reading »

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Oct 14

See also:

More Than 90 Percent Of Canadians Are Contaminated With Bisphenol-A (BPA)

–  The Age of Treason: 1958 Book Exposes Current Chemical Attack on Humanity

Baby bottles: controversial chemical not removed in UK despite bottle ban in US

–  FDA Criticized Over Plastic Chemical

–  New Study: Plastic Chemical Tied to Heart Disease and Diabetes

–  Chemicals in Plastic Shown to Cause Reproductive and Neurological Disorders


(NaturalNews) Bisphenol A (BPA), the endocrine-disrupting plastics compound that has garnered much attention for its prevalence in infant- and water bottles, is far more common in an even more widely used family of products: canned foods and beverages.

Almost 100 percent of canned food and beverage products on the market are lined with a resin made from BPA, and have been since the 1940s. These epoxy resins prevent the metal of the can from influencing the flavor of the food. More importantly, they prevent compounds in the food from reacting with the metal, causing spoilage and even causing cans to explode.

Exposure from this source is “far more extensive” than from plastic bottles, said Shanna Swan of the University of Rochester in New York. After all, BPA is known to leach from cans into food, the chemical is used in nearly all canned products, and nearly everyone consumes such products regularly.

BPA is known to mimic estrogen and otherwise interfere with the hormonal system, and studies have linked it to elevated risks of cancer, diabetes and heart disease. In January, the FDA admitted for the first time that “some concern” exists over the chemical’s effects.

More recent findings are even more troubling, suggesting that BPA can effect “epigenetic changes,” modifying the way that the body’s genes are expressed in a way that can be passed on to an exposed person’s children and grandchildren. One of these changes removes carbon groups that lock DNA from being affected by estrogens in the environment.

Continue reading »

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Oct 11


The chemical found in every day containers may cause prostate cancer

A “GENDER bending” chemical found in everyday plastic food and drink containers, tins and baby bottles may cause prostate cancer, scientists are warning.

Levels of the chemical typically found in humans can damage the prostate but also make it inflamed – creating ideal conditions for the disease to develop.

It is the latest research to show that bisphenol A (BPA) is ­harmful to human health.

It is widely used to harden ­plastics and is found in baby bottles, CD cases, plastic cutlery and the lining of food and drink cans.

Scientists are concerned at its use because it mimics the female sex hormone oestrogen and may interfere with the way hormones are processed by the body.

Some studies on animals have shown the chemical to be safe, but others have linked it to breast cancer, liver damage, obesity and fertility problems.

It is estimated that BPA is detectable in more than 90 per cent of people and is one of the world’s most widely manufactured chemicals, with more than 2.2million tons made each year.

Denmark became the first EU country to ban BPA in food and drink containers for the under-threes earlier this year and it has also been barred in Canada and three US states.

The latest research, led by experts at the University of ­Illinois in Chicago, saw newborn rats exposed to a low dose of BPA at levels similar to those found in humans.

It was discovered the level of BPA significantly increased the rats’ susceptibility to certain lesions – which are a known ­precursor of prostate cancer.

Continue reading »

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Aug 22

The Age of Treason: 1958 Book Exposes Current Chemical Attack on Humanity


(NaturalNews) A recent report released by Statistics Canada, Canada’s official statistical agency, has revealed that more than 90 percent of Canadians are contaminated with bisphenol-A (BPA), a toxic chemical compound used in many plastics and resins. The report is the first of its kind in Canada to verify the extent to which BPA has invaded the bodies of the population at large.

“[F]or the very first time [we] have baseline information against which we can study trends and track what is happening with respect to bisphenol A exposure,” explained Tracey Bushnik from Statscan’s Health Analysis Division in a Reuters article.

In 2008, Canada banned BPA from baby bottles, but the chemical is still widely used both there and around the world in can liners and other plastic materials used in various consumer products.

Continue reading »

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Sep 17

Groups Raise Questions About the Safety of Bisphenol A

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Sept. 16, 2008 — Researchers and environmental groups attacked the FDA for concluding that a widely used plastic ingredient is safe for humans, saying the agency ignored critical studies showing potential ill health effects.

The comments came at a hearing called by the FDA to examine the science around bisphenol A (BPA). The chemical is used in hard plastic products, including some baby and water bottles, and is also used to line metal food cans.

A growing number of advocacy groups and some members of Congress have called on regulators to ban bisphenol A.

Continue reading »

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Sep 16

Bisphenol A previously associated with developmental problems in fetuses

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) — Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in plastics that include baby bottles and packaging for food and beverages, may put people at risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study concludes.

Adding to the controversy surrounding this ubiquitous chemical, this study fuels the fears of those who want it banned. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in April that BPA was “safe and that exposure levels to BPA from food contact materials, including for infants and children, are below those that may cause health effects.”

The research, published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, was released early to coincide with a public hearing the FDA is holding on the issue Tuesday.

Continue reading »

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Jun 26

By Joshua Zaffos, Colorado Springs Independent
Posted on June 26, 2008

From car seats to condoms, nasty compounds have invaded our lives.
Hormones are going haywire, and our human future is at risk.

I am half the man my father is.

This disturbing fortune came to me about five years ago, but not from an odd relative or a sadistic girlfriend. Instead, this dinner-table diagnosis came from Theo (short for Theodora) Colborn, an internationally known scientist who has helped develop the field of research exploring how chemical compounds interfere with the hormones that guide human development.

Known as endocrine disruption, chemicals found in computer screens and car seats, shower curtains and shampoo, plastic water bottles and prophylactics are skewing our odds against cancers and causing developmental delays and reproductive roadblocks, including declining sperm counts.

So, when Colborn informed me of my inferior manhood, I took consolation in the fact that she was indicting my entire generation — and her own — for loading our natural environment, our workplaces and our homes with tens of thousands of chemical compounds without really having a clue about what we’re doing. Our Stolen Future, the book Colborn co-authored in 1996, first delivered this bad news to the general public.

More than a decade later, scientists are still conducting experiments and measuring results, from cramped basement labs at universities to expansive high-country lakes in the wilderness. The hypotheses generally aren’t questions of whether chemicals are pervading and persisting in the environment, but rather how severely they are stunting our development and health. The federal government has investigated these questions with timidity, if not contempt, operating a regulatory system practically beholden to the chemical industry.

With half of my manhood at stake and hopes for a better assessment in the future, I’m wondering how we can heed the warning signs and reverse our chemical course.

A day in my half-life

For years, I started off each day drinking coffee out of a metallic cup, likely coated with bisphenol-A, a chemical commonly used to line plastic bottles and other food and beverage cans and containers. Anyone who has lugged around a Nalgene bottle made of polycarbonate plastic, trying to save the Earth one paper cup at a time, has gotten his or her share of bisphenol-A, which leaches from containers into liquids to enter our bodies. A U.S. Centers for Disease Control study detected bisphenol-A in 93 percent of all Americans.

Inside us, bisphenol-A mimics estrogen, plugging into hormone receptors; this is endocrine disruption. In pregnant or breastfeeding mothers and young and prepubescent children, it can have critical impacts, rewiring our developmental profiles and opening up our risks for cancers and physical and behavioral abnormalities. Lab tests suggest that chronic, low-dose exposure to bisphenol-A — like drinking out of a coated cup or polycarbonate bottle daily — may cause women to have greater chances of breast cancer and polycystic ovary syndrome, a leading cause of infertility, and men to have increased odds of prostate cancer and reduced sperm counts.

That’s a lot to think about during the day’s first cup of coffee or sip of water. Now I try to stick to ceramic mugs and glasses.

As my body starts to properly caffeinate in the mornings, I usually sit in front of a laptop and do whatever it is writers do to put off writing — checking e-mails and boxscores — until I’m warmed up. As a computer warms up, particles inside start to fly and some catch a ride on dust. For years, I breathed in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from my laptop.

These compounds are flame-retardants, nearly universally used in couch cushions, televisions, cars and carpets. PBDEs have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones, and, according to lab tests, they can lower our bodies’ production of the real thing.

Over time, thyroid-hormone deficiencies can hurt metabolism. Hypothyroidism causes fatigue, depression, anxiety, hair loss and a waning libido. Women with low thyroid-hormone counts are five times more likely to have children with IQs that qualify them as mildly retarded, according to one study. A 2005 experiment found that a single low dose of a common PDBE given to rats in utero resulted in a class of hyperactive rodents with persistent low sperm counts.

Continue reading »

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May 10

(NaturalNews) Our children’s brains and reproductive organs may be having their development harmed by an estrogen-like chemical that is present in plastic according to a federal health agency report. BPA is an ingredient in polycarbonate plastic. BPA is also one of the most widely used synthetic chemicals today. It has been shown to seep from hard plastic beverage containers (such as baby bottles) and even from liners in cans that contain food and infant formula.

The National Toxicology Program (part of the National Institutes of Health) has concluded that there is some concern that fetuses, babies and children are being harmed because bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to harm animals at levels that are surprisingly low and found in nearly all humans.

The draft report followed an 18-month review that involved allegations of bias, disputes among scientists, and even the firing of a consulting company that had financial ties to the chemical industry.

Some scientists fear that BPA exposure early in life disrupts hormones and alters genes. This may program a fetus or child for breast or prostate cancer, may set them up for premature female puberty, and may lead to attention deficit disorders and other reproductive or neurological disorders. Continue reading »

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Apr 16

A chemical used in all kinds of plastic, including baby bottles and food containers, could be linked to a prostate and breast cancer, a preliminary government report has found.

The federal National Toxicology Program said yesterday that experiments on rats found precancerous prostate tumors, urinary system problems and early puberty when the animals were fed or injected with low doses of the chemical, bisphenol-A.

The latest draft significantly increased the chemical’s risk level from a bisphenol-A statement the government released last year.

“It’s an important step to have a federal agency acknowledge that it has concerns about bisphenol-A and breast cancer and prostate cancer,” said Pete Myers, chief scientist for Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit that raises awareness of chemical risks. “It’s a scary compound.” Continue reading »

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