Mar 02

German Beer Industry in Shock over Glyphosate Contamination:

The Munich Environmental Institute (Umweltinstitut München) has released shocking results Thursday of laboratory testing it has completed on 14 of the most sold beers in Germany. The probable carcinogen and World’s most used herbicide – glyphosate – was found in all of the 14 beers tested.

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Source: www.br.de

German Beer – Glyphosate Testing Results:

Hasseröder Pils – 29,74 μg/l (ppb)
Jever Pils – 23,04 μg/l
Warsteiner Pils – 20,73 μg/l
Radeberger Pilsner – 12,01 μg/l
Veltins Pilsener – 5,78 μg/l
Oettinger Pils – 3,86 μg/l
König Pilsener – 3,35 μg/l
Krombacher Pils – 2,99 μg/l
Erdinger Weißbier – 2,92 μg/l
Paulaner Weißbier – 0,66 μg/l
Bitburger Pils – 0,55 μg/l
Beck’s Pils – 0,50 μg/l
Franziskaner Weißbier – 0,49 μg/l
Augustiner Helles – 0,46 μg/l

In 2015 the World Health Organization’s cancer agency IARC declared that glyphosate is a probable human carcinogen.

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Feb 28

hasseroeder

Cancer-linked pesticide found in popular German beer:

Fourteen different beers sold in Germany contain traces of a pesticide believed to be carcinogenic, a new study reveals.

Small amounts of Glyphosate – a substance most commonly used for weed killing and supposedly carcinogenic – were found in fourteen of the most popular brews in Germany, a new study conducted by the Environmental Institute in Munich has shown.

The highest amount of the pesticide – 29.74 micrograms – was detected in a liter of Hasseröder, while a liter of Bavarian Augustiner contained 0.46 micrograms, making it “the safest” of the brews tested.

Well-known Beck’s Pils finished with 5 micrograms per liter. Paulaner Weissbier and Erdinger Weissbier had 0.66 and 2.92 micrograms, respectively.

The allowable limit of glyphosate in drinking water is 0.1 micrograms per liter, according to Der Spiegel. Continue reading »

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Mar 21

Guinness Made In Dublin Brings You Fluoride (Max Keiser, March 17, 2013):

“I can confirm that the water supply used to make Guinness, as with most of south Dublin, is the public water supply coming from the Poulaphouca reservoir and we do not further filter this water.

There is a regulation (EC) No 1925/2006 on the addition of vitamins and minerals to foods which, among other things, prohibits addition of vitamins and minerals (such as fluoride) to alcoholic beverages.

The authorities are aware that most food producers in this country use the public water supply which is required by law to be fluoridated thus many food products will have fluoride from the water.

This does not amount to the addition of the mineral to the food.” Jen Gordon Diageo Consumer Relations.  Adding of flouride to water supplies has been banned throughout most EU jurisdictions.

The industrial grade chemical added to our water supply , known as Hydrofluorosilicic acid, contains not just the requisite fluoride ion, but also varying quantities of mercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium, aluminium and beryllium.

The Irish public have never once been informed of the side effects of fluoride. The Department of Health have admitted that over-exposure to fluoride causes dental fluorosis; a sign that the body has become saturated with fluoride.

If fluoride can do this to teeth, it raises serious concerns as to what it is doing to the rest of the body.

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Jan 16

Inflation Rocks the UK as Beer Gets Watered Down (ZeroHedge, Jan 15, 2013):

These types of stories are popping up with increased frequency throughout the western world.  Products are simply declining in quality, and in many cases these declines are being accompanied by price increases.  Remember my article from a week ago Inflation Hits Coffee as Brewers Secretly Swap Robusta for Arabica.  This is more or less the same story, except this time in the UK and centered around beer.  From CNBC:

Britain’s favorite pint of bitter is being watered down as austerity continues to bite and taxes rise.

John Smith’s Extra Smooth, billed as “no nonsense beer”, is being reduced from 3.8 percent alcohol to 3.6 percent in response to rising costs and reduced beer consumption.

Heineken, which is also raising the cost of the famous bitter by about 2.5 pence a pint, said it was bringing John Smith’s “in line with competitor smooth ales that already sit at or below this alcoholic strength”, including its biggest rival, Carlsberg’s Tetley Smoothflow.

Now here is my favorite line:

“Extensive research conducted with retailers and consumers consistently confirmed that a 0.2 percent reduction in [alcohol content] does not compromise on the taste and quality,” a Heineken U.K. spokesman said.

Um yeah, but it does compromise on the alcohol…the main reason most people drink beer in the first place. Continue reading »

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Oct 31

See also:

Bilderberg Hollande Defends 75% Tax Rate To A Disillusioned France


President Hollande to push through legislation to fund social programmes – but brewers condemn plan as ‘kick in teeth’


Francois Hollande Is Another Bilderberg Stooge (Video)

French brewers hit by 160% rise in beer tax (Guardian, Oct 30, 2012):

The French president, François Hollande, is pushing through legislation to increase taxes on beer by 160% to help fund social programmes, as France struggles to contain a budget deficit hit hard by the economic crisis.

The tax increase will affect local brews and the 30% of imported beer the French drink. The change will push up the price of a beer by about 20% in bars and supermarkets, said Jacqueline Lariven, spokeswoman for the French brewer’s federation, Brasseurs de France.

The Brewers of Europe trade group described the measure as a “kick in the teeth”, as it follows a 6% fall in beer production and an 8% drop in consumption in the EU since the region’s debt crisis began in 2008.

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Apr 13

The big problem with inflation is that people get low blood sugar when they are hungry, and soon their moods turn sour. I know this for a fact because if breakfast or brunch or lunch or coffee break or dinner or any snack is five minutes late, I involuntarily turn into a screaming monster from hell demanding to know who stole my food and vowing bloody revenge. I can only imagine the anger when hunger is caused because someone can’t afford to buy food!

This “inability to buy food” is one of the problems with inflation, and that ugliness is now here, as we read from Bloomberg.com that “The World Bank in Washington says 33 nations from Mexico to Yemen may face ‘social unrest’ after food and energy costs increased for six straight years.” Hahaha! No kidding?

World Bank chief Robert Zoellick says, “Thirty-three countries around the world face potential social unrest because of the acute hike in food and energy prices”, and that since 2005, “the prices of staples have jumped 80%”.

Like what? Like corn and wheat, which are making the news by rising like crazy, and the latest food emergency is that “Rice, the staple food for half the world,” is now double the price of a year ago, and a fivefold increase from 2001. Yikes!

100% inflation in the price of rice in one year! And 500% in seven years! Yikes again! No wonder that Jody Clarke at MoneyWeek.com reports that “Since January 2005 the average price of a loaf of bread in the US has risen 32%. Overall, US retail food prices rose 4 % last year, the biggest jump in 17 years, says the US Department of Agriculture. Meanwhile restaurant owners have been even harder hit, with wholesale price increases of 7.4%. That’s the biggest jump in nearly three decades, according to the National Restaurant Association.”

And worse yet for us alcohol-besotted worthless lushes out here, heroically keeping bartenders and comely barmaids gainfully employed year around, the price of hops, an integral ingredient in beer making, has soared from $4 a pound to $40.

The Marketbasket Survey, conducted by the American Farm Bureau Federation, says a basket of things like bread, milk, eggs and pork chops will cost you $3.50, or 8.9%, more this year than last. Both a five-pound bag of flour and a dozen eggs are up over 40% since January 2007. Continue reading »

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Mar 18

Children across Britain face being given a criminal record if they are caught holding a can of beer, under new plans being considered by the Government.The measure would mean any person under the age of 18 caught just holding an alcoholic beverage may be tarnished with a conviction, which would need to be declared to future employers.

The proposals follow recent warnings from Home Secretary Jacqui Smith that the police would be given greater powers to remove alcohol from youngsters.

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Criminal record: Children caught holding a can of beer could face a conviction Continue reading »

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Mar 06

If you’re looking for a sure sign the U.S. economy is headed in the wrong direction, all you need to do is look at the skyrocketing price of “recession-proof” foods: pizza, hot dogs, bagels and beer.For many Americans, the credit crunch and the mortgage mess have left their pocketbooks – and their cupboards – bare. These same consumers, many living paycheck to paycheck, have relied on these cheaper foods to keep their expenditures down. Not anymore.

In the past few months, the news has gone from bad to worse:

* Pizza makers have seen their cheese costs soar this year from $1.30 a pound to $1.76 a pound. Even worse, the flour used to make the dough has gone from $3-$7 dollars a bushel to $25 a bushel in less than a year.
* Beer makers have been forced to raise their prices because of the skyrocketing price of hops – one of the principle ingredients. The price of hops has gone from about $4 a pound in September to $40 a pound. The price of barley, beer’s other main ingredient, has nearly doubled.
* Bagel shops have struggled to hold the line on prices and keep their customers. The exploding wheat prices have made the $1 bagel a fact of life in big cities such as New York. Donuts are averaging $1.50. And many shop owners fear a wheat shortage will drive prices even higher.
* Even the lowly hot dog is getting more expensive. Gray’s Papaya, a New York hot dog institution, will be jacking up the price for its $3.50 “Recession Special” – two hot dogs and a 14-ounce drink. Nicholas Gray, owner of the frankfurter chain, has yet to set the price increase, but he indicated it is coming soon.

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Overall, retail food prices rose 4 percent last year – the biggest jump in 17 years. The USDA officials predicted another 3 percent to 4 percent increase this year and continuing price hikes, faster than the pace of inflation going into 2010. And the price pinch has hit the lower-income shoppers hardest.

Why is this happening? Call it the perfect storm of inflationary pressures.

Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic Inc., a food industry consulting firm, described the cost increases as a “disaster scenario,” with no real end in sight and limited ability for most to pass on the bulk of the costs to consumers.

Surging energy costs have driven up the price of transporting goods from farm to storefront. The national average for a gallon of gas jumped to $3.164, creeping closer to last May’s record of $3.227, according to AAA and the Oil Price Information Service. Diesel prices jumped 1.5 cents to a new record national average of $3.642 a gallon.

While most Americans fuel their cars with gasoline, most of the products they buy are transported by trucks, trains and ships that burn diesel. While gas prices are unlikely to rise as high as $4 a gallon, diesel may well pass that psychologically important level this spring, boosting prices of virtually every consumer product, said Tom Kloza, publisher and chief oil analyst at the Oil Price Information Service in Wall, New Jersey.

“It’s everything that gets shipped,” Kloza said of diesel fuel’s impact on the economy. “That is the one that is much scarier.”

Another reason for the sharp hike in food prices is the increasing demand for ethanol, which has driven up the price of corn – and at the same time created a shortage of wheat as farmers shift their crop to the more lucrative corn.

“There are several reasons [for higher food prices], but at the core is corn, the largest and most important of agricultural commodities,” said Bill Lapp, president of Advanced Economic Solutions.

Which brings us back to the price of flour – and the pricier pizza. Jimmy Ferrell, owner of the four Fat Jimmy’s pizza restaurants in Louisville, Ky., said the price of flour has forced him to pass the cost onto his customers. “You have to raise (prices) a couple times a year just to keep up,” he said.

Ferrell thinks the rising flour prices have hurt small operators more than national chains.

“The national chains have a lot more pull and they can negotiate prices. I don’t think we have the same buying power that a Papa John’s or a Domino’s obviously has.”

Food industry consultant Goldin doesn’t see a light at the end of the tunnel. “There are no simple solutions,” he said. “The trend will be to reduce product costs, and some of that may very well affect quality.”

So, how can budget-conscious consumers stretch their dollar? There is one – albeit artery-clogging – alternative.

Fast food companies, looking for a way to attract budget-conscious customers, are increasingly offering more food for less money. The “dollar-menu” option is growing at chains such as McDonald’s, Burger King and Quiznos.

That’s good news for diners like Boston resident Shekia Scott. While lunching with friends at a Burger King, Scott said higher prices for food and gas were hurting her budget. But, she added, “the dollar menu’s been a help.”

So there you have it. Your best option for cheap eats is a gut-busting McDonald’s double cheeseburger for a buck. Makes you want to cry in your beer … if you can afford it.

The Associated Press and CNBC contributed to this report. By Al Olson

MSNBC updated 11:18 p.m. ET Feb. 29, 2008

Source: MSNBC

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