We Told You So: Antibiotic Resistance & the Food Supply

We Told You So: Antibiotic Resistance & the Food Supply:

Two decades ago, health pioneers warned the world about the deadly effects of overuse of antibiotics. In the past few years, we have seen allopathic medications creating bacteria that are completely resistant to all forms of medicine known to doctors. Are we seeing a new age where otherwise healthy people will die of once-common ailments?

H/t reader squodgy.

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Medical Experts Warn ‘Terrible Tipping Point’ Reached In 2017 Will Have Worldwide Ramifications – ‘Luck Will Play A Bigger Role In Your Future Than Any Doctor Could’

Medical Experts Warn ‘Terrible Tipping Point’ Reached In 2017 Will Have Worldwide Ramifications – ‘Luck Will Play A Bigger Role In Your Future Than Any Doctor Could’:

‘The End To Modern Medicine As We Know It’

H/t reader squodgy.

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‘Nightmare’ Superbug May Have Spread Outside Hospitals

‘Nightmare’ Superbug May Have Spread Outside Hospitals:

Six people in Colorado recently became infected with a “nightmare” superbug that until now, has mostly been limited to people in hospitals, according to a new report. The new cases suggest the superbug may have spread outside of health care facilities.

The superbug is known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, a family of bacteria that are difficult to treat because they are resistant to powerful antibiotics. So far, nearly all cases of CRE infections have been seen in people who stay health care facilities, or who have been treated with certain medical procedures or devices, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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23,000 Americans died in 2013 from bacterial infections due to failed antibiotics

23,000 Americans died in 2013 from bacterial infections due to failed antibiotics:

Tens of thousands of people in the United States die each year from antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2013, the number killed by superbugs was 23,000.

As shocking as these figures are, all evidence suggests that the problem is just going to keep getting worse. According to a 2014 study by the British government’s Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, the global death toll from superbug outbreaks is likely to reach 10 million per year by 2050. That figure is higher than the 8.2 million who die from cancer and the 1.5 million who die from diabetes, combined.

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Lyme disease: a ticking time bomb

FYI.

Antibiotics are, in my opinion, no solution.

Nature’s antibiotics, i.e. plants with antibiotic properties, are part of the solution.


Lyme disease: a ticking time bomb:

On any ranked list of nasty diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas in the Western world, Borrelia burgdorferi, would have to lie near the top. These bacteria cause Lyme disease, which was first recognised in the US in the early 1970s among patients in Lyme, Connecticut. However, the oldest known case was the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper-age mummified individual, discovered in the Italian Alps.

Lyme disease is one of the fastest growing vector-borne diseases in the Western world – the threat it poses has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Estimates suggest that more than 300,000 people are diagnosed with the disease each year in the US and more than 65,000 cases a year are diagnosed in Europe. However, the true number of people affected is probably underestimated due to under-reporting and the limitations of current diagnostic tests.

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Donation & The Many Benefits Of Cistus Incanus

Cistus incanus
The hairy rockrose (Cistus incanus), a native to the Mediterranean tea plant, contains a large quantity of polyphenols. Especially in Greece the cistus-tea has a long tradition, however, has passed into oblivion over the years. In 1999, Cistus Incanus has won the „European Medicinal Plant of the Year“ award and was thus rediscovered. (More info, incl. scientific studies, down below.)

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Thirty-fourth donation in 2016.

Infinite Unknown reader A.S. donated $5.

Thank you for your support!

Very much needed and appreciated.

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Donations in June: $60, £50, €30, $10 (AUD)

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The 50-Year Cover-Up Killing Millions

The 50-Year Cover-Up Killing Millions:

Antibiotic-resistant infections affect 2 million Americans annually, leading to the death of at least 23,000.1 Even more die from complications related to the infections, and the numbers are steadily growing.

According to the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA), just one organism — methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA — kills more Americans each year than the combined total of emphysema, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, and homicide.2

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The end of chemical medicine: Superbug discovered in America that resists ALL known antibiotics… blind faith in failed pharma will soon cost you your life

The end of chemical medicine: Superbug discovered in America that resists ALL known antibiotics… blind faith in failed pharma will soon cost you your life:

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1 in 3 Antibiotics Prescribed In U.S. Are Unnecessary, Major Study Finds (Washington Post)

Millions of unneeded antibiotic prescriptions

1 in 3 antibiotics prescribed in U.S. are unnecessary, major study finds:

This post has been updated.

Nearly a third of antibiotics prescribed in doctors’ offices, emergency rooms and hospital-based clinics in the United States are not needed, according to the most in-depth study yet to examine the use and misuse of these life-saving drugs.

The finding, which has implications for antibiotics’ diminished efficacy, translates to about 47 million unnecessary prescriptions given out each year across the country to children and adults. Most of these are for conditions that don’t respond to antibiotics, such as colds, sore throats, bronchitis, flu and other viral illnesses.

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11 Common Health Symptoms Hint At Global Depopulation ‘Slow Kill’

H/t reader squodgy:

“At last, someone else with influence is joining the dots…..”


Planet-Earth-Buring-Space-Fire

11 common health symptoms hint at global depopulation ‘slow kill’ (Natural News, May 26, 2015):

If you take a look around, modern humanity is quite clearly facing an unprecedented crisis of deteriorating health. And beneath the surface, for those able and willing to see the truth, the various health conditions that increasingly plague the average man and woman appear to be intentionally inflicted as part of a covert effort to reduce the world’s population and create a paradise on Earth for the elites — with much fewer of the rest of us!

The following 11 common health symptoms point to a sinister, “slow kill” agenda that’s been designed to quietly cull the masses without overt fanfare:

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New Study Shows Roundup Herbicide Causes Antibiotic Resistance In Bacteria

New Study Shows Roundup Herbicide Causes Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria (Sustainable Pulse, March 24, 2015):

Research lead by a team from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand has found that commonly used herbicides, including the world’s most used herbicide Roundup, can cause bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics.

roundup-causes-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

Full Study:  mbio.asm.org/content/6/2/e00009-15

Herbicides are used to kill plants. They can be tested for killing bacteria, too, as part of the process of reviewing their approval for use. However, they have never been tested for other effects on bacteria, University of Canterbury’s Professor Jack Heinemann says.

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Norwegian Authorities Ban GM Fish Feed Over Antibiotic Resistance Fears

Norwegian Authorities Ban GM Fish Feed over Antibiotic Resistance Fears (Sustainable Pulse, Nov 30, 2014):

According to the Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has stopped approving (on a yearly basis) GMOs for use in fish feed that contain genes coding for antibiotic resistance. According to the Advisory Board, this applies to 8 out of 19 GMOs which the fish feed industry had previously been given permission to use since 2008.

fish-farms-norway

Norwegian Source:  bioteknologiradet.no

Source: GM Watch

“The fear is that genes in the GM feed that code for antibiotic resistance may be taken up by various bacteria in the soil in the country where the GMO is produced, in the feed production chain, or in the gut of the fish. Scientists know little about to what extent, or if, this happens with genes that are inserted via genetic modification, but few would deny that it could happen. If the genes first have entered into a bacterium [during the genetic engineering process], they may quickly spread further.”

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Antibiotics Found At High Concentrations In China’s Lakes And Rivers

China-Map-Close-Up-Country

Antibiotics found at high concentrations in China’s lakes and rivers (Natural News, May 27, 2014):

Cities in China are quickly becoming toxic waste sites, emitting so much pollution now that people have to walk around with filters over their face. Even the bright blue skies above these highly polluted cities can’t disperse the smog. One man has even proposed selling jarred French mountain air to Chinese city dwellers. Many “organic” products coming from China contain alarming levels of heavy metals, as tested by the Natural News Forensic Food Lab.

As these modern-day chemicals are consumed en masse and discarded into the environment as waste, they begin infiltrating the countryside, accumulating in rivers and lakes. A joint study by the East China University of Science and Technology and the Tongji and Tsinghua Universities, reports that Chinese water quality is plummeting fast, with worrisome amounts of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals appearing throughout the country’s waterways.

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The Antibiotics That Could Kill You

The antibiotics that could kill you (CNN, April 22, 2014):

Editor’s note: Dr. Martin J. Blaser is the Singer Professor of Medicine and director of the Human Microbiome Program at New York University. He was previously the president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and is the author of a new book, “Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics is Fueling Our Modern Plagues” (Henry Holt). The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

(CNN) — In 2010, Americans were prescribed 258 million courses of antibiotics, a rate of 833 per thousand people. Such massive usage, billions of doses, has been going on year after year.

We have few clues about the consequences of our cumulative exposures. We do know that widespread antibiotic treatments make us more susceptible to invaders by selecting for resistant bacteria.

These risks are now well-known, but I want to lay out a new concern: that antibiotic use over the years has been depleting the pool of our friendly bacteria — in each of us — and this is lowering our resistance to infections. In today’s hyperconnected globe, that means that we are at high risk of future plagues that could spread without natural boundaries from person to person and that we could not stop. I call this “antibiotic winter.”

To explain: In the early 1950’s, scientists conducted experiments to determine whether our resident microbes — the huge number of bacteria that live in and on our bodies, now called our “microbiome” — help in fending off invading bacteria. They fed mice a species of a typical invader, disease-causing salmonella. It took about 100,000 organisms to infect half of the normal mice. But when they first gave mice an antibiotic, which kills both good and bad bacteria, and then several days later gave them salmonella, it took only three organisms to infect them. This isn’t a 10 or 20% difference; it’s a 30,000-fold difference.

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