Apr 14

Fukushima-Mutation

- Fairewinds Video: ‘Anomalies’ in plants and animals documented by Fukushima residents, some severely deformed — Scientists: Genetic mutations observed in Fukushima include trees with peculiar distortions, insect abnormalities, tumors in birds, more (PHOTO) (ENENews, April 13, 2014):

Fairewinds Energy Education, Apr. 10, 2014 — Chiho Kaneko, member of the Board of Directors of Fairewinds originally from Iwate, Japan (at 11:15 in): It’s not just people who are sicker. I met a home gardener who lives in Kawamata, Fukushima, 30-miles from Fukushima Daiichi. She grows luffas, whose fruit is often dried to make bath sponges. Last year, with some trepidation, she used the seeds saved from the year before. She found flower buds directly growing out of the fruit. Some of her pole beans were abnormally gigantic. Near Fukushima city, another person saw a frog so severely deformed that, at first, it was difficult to tell that it was a frog, save for its hopping. These are true events described by people I met who took notes and photographs of these environmental anomalies.

Asian Perspective Vol. 37, No. 4, Anders Pape Møller and Timothy A. Mousseau, Oct.-Dec. 2013: A careful observer [who visits Chernobyl or Fukushima] will quickly become aware of the peculiar distortions of tree growth, numerous abnormalities in insects, and tumors and cataracts in birds, all caused by genetic mutations induced by exposure to the radiation [...] radiation causes damage to DNA molecules (leading to mutations if not repaired) [...] We have known for more than eighty years that low-dose radiation has cytotoxic effects and causes mutations. [...] we looked at 373 effect sizes from forty-six different studies [...] they showed a statistically significant negative effect of radiation [...] on mutation, physiology, immunology, and disease. As one would expect, effects were stronger on plants, which are stuck in one place, than on animals that can move around [...] As the first scientists in both Chernobyl and Fukushima, we have performed [fifteen] published tests, of organisms ranging from plants and insects to birds and mammals in Chernobyl, that support the hypothesis that low-dose radiation disrupts development, and all fifteen studies show a higher degree of asymmetry in the more contaminated plots. [...] we have assembled effect sizes from all published studies of mutation rates from Chernobyl, in total 151 estimates of mutations in forty-five studies of thirty-three species ranging from bacteria and plants to insects, birds, and mammals, including humans [The] findings are robust in showing a general, strong overall mean effect size of radiation on mutation rates. [...] Mutations accumulate with time and across generations, so we may only be seeing the first stages of the negative public health consequences [...] for humans.

Watch the Fairewinds video here

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Mar 28


Added: Mar 23, 2014

Description:

This is a video of the mass animal deaths that have been occurring across the world from 2008 to 2014. Continue reading »

Tags: , ,

Mar 28

- Reports: “Experts agree many species of wildlife and fisheries are endangered globally due to large release of radioactivity into ocean” at Fukushima — “Has Fukushima radiation entered New Zealand ecosystem?” (ENENews, March 27, 2013):

New Zealand Herald, Mar. 27, 2014: Has Fukushima radiation entered NZ’s ecosystem? — Scientists are to check whether New Zealand muttonbirds that spend the winter off the coast of Japan have been exposed to radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant. In a new pilot study, University of Auckland scientists will investigate whether radioactive cesium has entered the New Zealand ecosystem or food chain via the birds. [...] researchers will test the birds’ feathers for gamma rays that indicate the presence of the radioactive isotope cesium-134.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Mar 14

False killer whale ‘Gandalf’:

“They have destroyed Japan and are continuously contaminating the Pacific. We have tried to escape but cannot walk over land. The ocean vibrates, radiation… radiation in the deep. We cannot get out. A shadow lurks in the dark. We can not get out… they (radioactive particles) are coming.”


False Killer Whale

‘Ultra-Rare’: Up to 70 endangered ‘whales’ by California coast — Seen once in several decades, lives in open ocean — Breached as if performing, rubbing heads on boat — So loud thought it was engine — “Seemed to be speaking to camera” — Also spotted in Western Pacific same day (VIDEO) (ENENews, March 14, 2014):

Corona Del Mar Today, Mar. 13, 2014: False killer whales are members of the dolphin family and are listed as endangered [...] “According to the news, these are so rare that they haven’t been seen in Southern California for well over a decade,” [Sgt. John Hollenbeck] said. “They were traveling in a pod of perhaps 50 or so, spread out over about a quarter of a mile. They were very noisy. I could hear them whistling and singing to each other through the hull of my boat as they passed around me. I’ve heard that many times before before with common dolphins, but these were much louder. Initially, I didn’t even realize it was their song – I thought there was something wrong with the engine on my boat.”

Pete Thomas Outdoors, Mar. 13, 2014: [There were] between 50 and 70. [...] [Capt. Dave Anderson] managed not only to capture close-ups of the false killer whales, but vocalizations [...] including one that seemed to be speaking to the camera. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” Anderson said. “I was sitting there for about five minutes and the whales came over and surrounded me. Their whistles were so loud I could hear them above the surface.”

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Mar 05

- ‘Mystery’ Solved? US Gov’t Expert: Large marine animals likely sensed danger of Fukushima plume and fled, “Not going to wait until they start to die off” — Explains unprecedented concentrations of whales and other sea life clustered just off West Coast (VIDEO) (ENENews, March 2, 2014):

RIA Novosti, Jun 15, 2011: Ocean currents ultimately carry this radioactive material to N. America

Jeff Feldner, Oregon Sea Grant Extension (NOAA) fisheries specialist (at 2:30 in): It’s probable that, for one thing, a lot of the larger animals got out of there quickly. The other thing is that I suspect animals, like whales for instance, I think they would probably be able to tell that something was wrong. They’re very, very intelligent animals. They’re not going to just wait until they start to die off. I think they’re probably likely going to voluntarily gotten out of the area.

Radioactive material has been flowing into the Pacific since the Fukushima disaster began 3 years ago. Scientists say its leading edge made it across the ocean by Summer 2013. Soon after, reports began to appear about unprecedented concentrations of large marine animals congregating close to shore along the west coast:

Dec. 21, 2013: “Unprecedented activity” near Canada’s West Coast: Whales in record numbers, displaying highly unusual behavior — Expert: Problems in Pacific could be bringing sea life to area; “Something’s amiss out there”

Nov. 30, 2013: Whale Expert near Vancouver: In 30 years I’ve never ever seen this kind of behavior, “They must sense this is a safe place to be” — Captain: I’ve never seen anything like it in 50 years on Pacific — “One even placed its head on the boat” (VIDEO)

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Mar 05


YouTube Added: Mar 5, 2014

Description:

Photographer Tiffany Corliss captured an incredible battle between a giant snake and a crocodile. The mortal combat between two animals occurred on Lake Mundarra in Australia. A ten-foot python fought with the croc for five hours, constricting the reptile to death. The snake then dragged the dead crocodile to the ground, where it swallowed it whole. The unbelievable dinner took place in front of the eyes of several onlookers who happened to be near at the time.

Tags: ,

Mar 01

- Japan orders killing of wild animals around Fukushima nuclear plant (Voice of Russia, Feb 27, 2014):

The area of four settlements near the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant has been covered by wild boars, pigs and raccoons. The Ministry of the Environment is drafting a decision to kill the animals that are currently roaming the settlements whence the population has been moved out due to high radiation levels.

Experts believe that a person’s accidental meeting with a wild animal may end in a tragedy, so wild animals should not be allowed to wander about randomly over the area, the Interfax news agency reports.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Feb 24

- US Gov’t: Scientists investigating if Fukushima radiation contributed to unusual deaths and sickness in marine mammals — Similar illness seen in Japan and other countries on Pacific — Expect ‘hairless seals’ this spring (ENENews, Feb 24, 2014):

Scientists investigating if Fukushima radiation contributed to unusual deaths and sickness in marine mammals

Northern Pinnipeds Unusual Mortality Event Fact Sheet, NOAA, Feb. 2014: Beginning mid-July 2011, elevated numbers of sick or dead seals with skin lesions started being discovered in the Arctic and Bering Strait regions of Alaska. [...] Diseased seals — primarily ringed seals — exhibited hair loss, delayed molting, and skin ulcers. Some of these seals also exhibited lethargy and labored breathing. [...] skin lesions in Pacific walruses in Alaska [were reported], with some associated mortality. Spotted seals and bearded seals were also affected. There were reports of pinnipeds [fin-footed marine mammals] with similar symptoms in Canada, Russia, and Japan. [...] Due to the unusual number of marine mammals discovered with similar symptoms across a wide geographic area, [...] NOAA and USFWS announced the declaration of an Unusual Mortality Event [...] the first UME involving subsistence species in coastal Alaskan communities. [...] Scientists consider multiple stressors in the environment to be contributing factors [...] some seals which are likely survivors of the disease are still exhibiting patchy alopecia. Hunters can expect to continue to see hairless seals in spring 2014, particularly in the subadult age group. [...] Despite extensive laboratory analysis [UME Researcher: Only 4 tissue samples were tested for radionuclides due to limited funding and capacity], no specific disease agent or process has been identified. [...] Testing continues for a wide range of possible factors in this disease, including immune system-related diseases, fungi, man-made and bio-toxins, radiation exposure [...] Preliminary radionuclide testing conducted by the University of Alaska Fairbanks found radiation levels within the typical background range [Prior reports from NOAA say otherwise]. Scientists are investigating the possibility that radiation could have been one of many factors that contributed to the illness [...]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Feb 19

Bald-Eagle

- TV: Bald eagles dying at rate “much higher than normal” and it’s not from West Nile virus as previously claimed — Now around 60 dead in Utah since December — “We feel helpless, we don’t have a lot of answers” (VIDEO) (ENENews, Feb 18, 2014):

KSL, Feb. 18, 2014: Lead blamed for latest bald eagle deaths in Utah [...] not West Nile virus [...] “It’s frustrating and it’s scary,” [Buz Marthaler] said. “Typically, we get eagles in this time of year for fractures.” [...] The center has lost eight bald eagles to lead poisoning since December, which is much higher than normal, Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah officials said. The center averages maybe three deaths from lead poisoning a year. “It seems like it’s increasing year after year,” Marthaler said,” and it’s not just eagles.” [...] Charles Hardy, public policy director for Gun Owners of Utah [...] believes the tests on eagles that found signs of lead poisoning are not conclusive [...] lead in its solid form does not spread and contaminate very easily [...]

KSL, Feb. 18, 2014: Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , ,

Feb 18

Human-animal hybrids, disasters in the making

- Human-animal hybrids, disasters in the making (The Voice Of Russia, Feb 4, 2014):

Scientists worldwide are creating bizarre human-animal hybrids that could wreak havoc on society. In the past ten years alone, unforgettable advances in the field of genetic modifications have left researchers and on-lookers stunned.

Nowadays, it is possible for a couple of university-age students to concoct new life forms in the comfort of their own basement. Regrettably so, laws have not been able to keep up with the pace at which scientists have been toying around with their creations.

Continue reading »

Tags: ,

Feb 11

- Fukushima-radiated West Co. cover up (Examiner, Jan 1, 2014)

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Feb 05
More-than-400-dead-dolphins-found-in-northern-Peru
More than 400 dolphins have washed up on the shores of northern Peru and scientists are attempting to investigate the reason behind this. (Credit: David W. Johnson)

- More than 400 dead dolphins found in northern Peru (UPI, Feb 3, 2014)

The cause of death for the dolphins has yet to be ascertained, but this is not the first time dolphins have washed up on the beaches of Peru.
LIMA — More than 400 dead dolphins have been found beached along the coast of northern Peru, with their cause of death still under investigation, according to media reports.The dolphins have been found over the past two weeks and it is not the first time this has happened. Numerous dolphins have been found on these beaches over the last two years. Imarpe, or the Peruvian Sea Institute, has sent a team of scientists to investigate why dolphins are beaching themselves. Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Jan 31

- More than 500 deep-sea lanternfish, squid found dead or dying in Nawiliwili area (Honolulu Star Advisor, Jan 29, 2014):

Between 500 and 800 lanternfish and squid were found dead or dying in the Nawiliwili Harbor area on Monday, prompting in investigation by state and federal officials into what caused the die-off.

The lanternfish and squid are typically found in the deep ocean, but are also known for their nightly vertical migrations to shallower depths, the Department of Land and Natural Resources said in a press release issued today.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , ,

Jan 30

Sea Star Wasting Disease

- NPR: West Coast sea stars melt into mush, “just vaporized… it’s the change of my lifetime” — “Ripping themselves apart… innards spilled out” — “Like the Matrix” — “That many species, that widespread… just scary” — “Makes me wonder, what’s next?” — ‘Possible’ Fukushima fallout is involved (VIDEO) (ENENews, Jan 30, 2014):

NPR, Jan. 30, 2014 (Emphasis Added): [...] Scientists first started noticing sick and dying sea stars last summer at a place called Starfish Point on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. [...] Reports have since surfaced from Alaska to as far south as San Diego, raising questions of whether this die-off is an indicator of a larger problem. [...] fat, multi-armed stars melted into piles of mush. [...] about a dozen species of sea stars are dying along the West Coast. Sea star wasting has also been reported at sites off the coast of Rhode Island and North Carolina. But researchers say until they’ve identified the cause of the West Coast die-offs, they can’t confirm any connection between these outbreaks. [...] Within a few hours, the sick stars started ripping themselves apart.  [...] Their innards spilled out and they died within 24 hours. As for the healthy looking stars [...]  they didn’t show symptoms anymore rapidly by being in the same tank with sickly stars. [...] Some have asked whether radiation or tsunami debris associated with the Fukushima disaster could be behind this die-off. But scientists now see Fukushima as an unlikely culprit because the die-offs are patchy, popping up in certain places like Seattle and Santa Barbara and not in others, such as coastal Oregon, where wasting has only been reported at one location. [...] there’s no evidence to entirely confirm or entirely rule out [...]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Jan 29

- Alaska Professor on Radio: Fukushima fallout a suspected factor in ‘unusual mortality’ of seals and walrus — We couldn’t test for plutonium (Audio) (ENENews, Jan 28, 2014):

Alaska Public Radio, Jan. 28, 2014 (at 4:30 in):

Fukushima Fallout A Suspected Factor In Unusual Mortality Of Seals And Walrus

In the days and weeks following 3/11, cesium-134 levels were roughly equal to cesium-137 levels. It is highly unlikely that cesium-134 was detected in the seals from the 1990s. If cesium-137 levels were comparable, adding in the cesium-134 means the 2011 seals should have about double the total cesium levels than the seals from the 1990s.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Jan 28

- Conditions never seen before by scientists in Pacific seals and walrus — Thyroid cysts, lesions of reproductive system, retained placenta — Hunters concerned — Oceanographers to discuss radiation from Fukushima on Alaska radio tomorrow (ENENews, Jan 27, 2014):

Alaska Marine Science Symposium (pdf), Jan. 20-24, 2014: Incidental Gross Necropsy Findings In Subsistence Harvested Ice Seals And Pacific Walrus [...] Ice seals (ringed, bearded, spotted seals) and Pacific walrus are very important subsistence species for Arctic coastal communities. As part of the North Slope Borough (NSB) ongoing Marine Mammal Health Research program, the department of wildlife management conducts necropsies and baseline tissue sampling on subsistence harvested marine mammals. We present some results from our 2011-2013 general ice seal [ringed, bearded, and spotted] and Pacific walrus subsistence harvest monitoring and sampling efforts due to hunter concern NOTE: Case reports (type 1 alopecia/delayed molt; type II ulcerative dermatitis, delayed molt etc.) from the ongoing 2011 Northern Pinniped unusual mortality event disease investigation were not included and will be reported elsewhere. Results: Incidental gross findings among the three species included: lesions of the reproductive system (adnexal cysts, uterine and penile melanosis, cliteromegaly, cryptorchism, retained placenta), endocrine system (thyroid cysts, adrenal nodules), musculoskeletal system (synovial cyst), integumentary system (panniculitis, epidermal molt (aka dreadlocks), skin sloughing) and digestive system (microdontia; chronic interstitial pancreatitis, hepatic cyst; cholestatic jaundice; geophagia). Helminths were commonly observed in the gastrointestinal system of ice seals [...] A variety of the observed pathological conditions (reproductive and endocrine lesions) are reported for the first time in Arctic Pinnipeds [...] Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jan 26

- Reports: White ‘goo’ everywhere in Alaska seal, crows won’t touch it… yet they eat people’s roofs — Slime in ones mouth, kidney almost black — Another appeared to change color — Hairless one seen recently: “We all still have sick seals here!” (PHOTOS) (ENENews, Jan 26, 2014)

Tags: , , ,

Jan 23


Giant rats put noses to work on Mozambique’s landmines

- Giant rats put noses to work on Mozambique’s landmines (Guardian, jan 22, 2014):

Landmine-detecting rats weigh as much as a domestic cat and are light enough to cross terrain without triggering explosives

A small army of landmine-detecting rats is to be redeployed in Mozambique in a push to meet a deadline to have the country declared free of mines this year.

Belgian non-governmental organisation Apopo trains African giant pouched rats to sniff out the explosives in landmines by conditioning them to associate the scent with rewards of food.

The rodents, which weigh about as much as a small domestic cat, are light enough to move over terrain without setting off the mines. They are followed by a team of mine-removal experts with metal detectors.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Jan 22

- TV: Problems with killer whales local to West Coast — Only baby born in 2013 died — Just two born in 2012 — Depleted fish supply blamed (ENENews, Jan 22, 2014):

KCET, Jan. 21, 2014: With just 81 individuals left, a population of killer whales (a.k.a. orcas) local to the West Coast has been listed as a federally Endangered species since 2005. Now, new data on the beleaguered whales’ habits is prompting a wildlife protection group to ask for better protection of orca habitat along more than half the U.S. Pacific coast — including more than a third of the California coast. [...] Southern Resident orcas will eat chum and coho salmon, as well as herring and rockfish, but they strongly prefer the larger Chinook salmon, which may make up as much as four fifths of their diet. And that means that protecting California salmon and their offshore habitat may well be crucial to the health of two of the Southern Resident orca’s three pods, especially in a drought year that may be devastating to California’s Chinook population. Southern Resident orcas may already be feeling the effects of drought, as well as other factors depleting fish stocks off the Pacific coast. Only two calves were born to the population in 2012, and 2013′s sole new calf died before the year was out.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , ,

Jan 21

Flashback:

- The Cove – Oscar Award Winner (‘Best Documentary’)

Related info:

- Government Of India Grants Dolphins Personhood


Taiji-The-Cove-Dolphins
Hundreds of dolphins are killed in a remote Japanese bay during hunting season. The town argues it is an important tradition, but conservationists maintain the bloody practice is inhumane

- Taiji Cove dolphins: Japanese government defends ‘lawful’ slaughter as hunters prepare to kill 200 animals (Independent, Jan 20, 2014):

Japanese fisherman have begun the slaughter of hundreds of bottlenose dolphins this morning, campaigners said, amid an international outcry over the annual hunt.

Members of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS), which is monitoring the cull, said fisherman had begun killing the dolphins corralled into the Taiji cove earlier this week at 7.30am.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jan 18

pigs-1234
The cloning methods may not be novel – but the application of mass production is

- China cloning on an ‘industrial scale’ (BBC News, Jan 14, 2014):

You hear the squeals of the pigs long before reaching a set of long buildings set in rolling hills in southern China.

Feeding time produces a frenzy as the animals strain against the railings around their pens. But this is no ordinary farm.

Run by a fast-growing company called BGI, this facility has become the world’s largest centre for the cloning of pigs.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Jan 08

- Agency: Dead Conjoined Baby Gray Whales found on West Coast of N. America — Could be first ever recorded — 2 heads and 2 tails, joined in middle (PHOTOS & VIDEO) (ENENews, Jan 7, 2014):

Pete Thomas Outdoors, Jan.6, 2014: Scientists find conjoined gray whale calves in Baja California lagoon; discovery could be a first[...] It might be the first documented case of conjoined twin gray whales. [...] A database search at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County did not reveal published instances of conjoined gray whale twins, or what might also be referred to as Siamese gray whale twins [...] Alisa Schulman-Janiger, an American Cetacean Society researcher, pointed out that the twins were underdeveloped and said that pointed to a premature birth. She also wondered about the fate of the mother. [...] They give birth during the southbound journey, or in the lagoons, and nurse their calves for several weeks before migrating back to the Bering and Chukchi seas. [...]

gray whales-2
Source: Jesus Gomez

Presna Latina News Agency, Jan. 7, 2014: Fishermen of the Mexican state of Baja California Sur found a baby whale dead with two heads and two tails, which is now under guard of the Directorate General of Wildlife. According to the National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (Conanp) the finding occurred on the afternoon of Sunday [...] This is a Conjoined Baby Gray Whales, because there are the two bodies, two heads and two tails, joined by the ventral region, Bermudez told the newspaper El Universal. [...]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Jan 06

- L.A. Times: Alarming West Coast sardine crash likely radiating through ecosystem — Experts warn marine mammals and seabirds are starving, may suffer for years to come — Boats return without a single fish — Monterey Bay: Hard to resist idea that humpback whales are trying to tell us something (ENENews, Jan 5, 2014):

Captain Corbin Hanson, Southern California, Jan. 5, 2014: [He was] growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, [they] returned to port without a single fish. “Tonight’s pretty reflective of how things have been going [...] Not very well.” [...] If his crew catches sardines these days, they are larger, older fish [...] Largely absent are the small and valuable young fish [...] the voice of another boat captain lamented over the radio, “I haven’t seen a scratch.” [...] By daybreak, Hanson was piloting the hulking boat back to the docks with nothing in its holds.

Los Angeles Times, Jan. 5, 2014:

  • West Coast sardine crash could radiate throughout ecosystem
  • [T]he biggest sardine crash in generations
  • [S]cientists say the effects are probably radiating throughout the ecosystem, starving brown pelicans, sea lions and other predators
  • [E]xperts warn the West Coast’s marine mammals, seabirds and fishermen could suffer for years Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jan 06

- “We see radiation from Fukushima in soils in Southern California, especially our desert regions” — High concentrations in seaweed prevented harvest this year — Also found in cattle and chicken feed (AUDIO) (ENENews, Jan 5, 2014):

 After Fukushima – Part 2 of 2, Disaster Awareness Preparedness and Planning/News, Views, and Alerts, Dec. 8, 2013:

(The first few minutes is an interview with Atyia Martin, Director of the Office of Public Health Preparedness at the Boston Public Health Commission)

At 6:15 in

Dr. Sherridan Ross, medical doctor, retired professor at University of California – Irvine, member of the Board of Directors at The Compton Community Organic Garden: Over here we’ve done a lot of things to make sure that our food supply has been safe, but it’s also cost us quite a bit. What we’d usually do is harvest a lot of the seaweed for places such as the Central Valley where a lot of our root crops, and also our lettuce and things come from. But because of the high concentration of radiation that’s in the seaweed, we haven’t been able to do that this year. We try to use the coast of California — initially we’d harvest tons of it, because it’s a renewable source, it’s very good, good for sucking up radiation and stuff that’s in the soil — that was our ‘out’.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jan 01

- Fukushima: Global Elite Political Theater (Government Slaves, Dec 31, 2013):

Something is far beyond contaminated and glow-fishy about the Fukushima meltdown. For two years it has been discussed and swarming with expertise, but with no limiting or actual efforts to stop the radiological contaminants from being released into the Pacific and all other connected oceans, the largest food and oxygen sources on the planet. Yet, surfers are surfing, swimmers are swimming, children are playing on beaches, and restaurants all over the earth are eating Pacific fish and also contaminated Atlantic fish according to multiple reports.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dec 31

- Starfish Wasting Disease outbreak could be due to radiation (News1130, Dec 30, 2013):

Scientist says radiation from nuclear plant damaged by 2011 earthquake can’t be ruled out

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – Researchers say nuclear pollution from the 2011 earthquake in Japan that damaged the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant could be partially to blame for a disease wiping out starfish along the West Coast.

Dr. Peter Raimondi of the University of Santa Cruz says something is making starfish susceptible to whats believed to be a bacteria coined “Wasting Disease.” It essentially disintegrate the marine invertebrates into a white goo, after the starfish loses its legs.

He says what’s making sea stars unable to fight off the bacteria could be anything from warm water to toxins–but Raimondi also says scientists can’t rule out nuclear pollution, especially in light of the tsunami that followed the 2011 earthquake.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Dec 30

Bald-Eagle

- LA Times: Experts suggest bald eagle deaths are related to Fukushima radiation — Idaho officials reporting similar sickness — “It’s hard to have your national bird in your arms, going through seizures” (AUDIO) (ENENews, Dec 30, 2013):

Los Angeles Times, Dec. 29, 2013: Bald eagles are dying in Utah — 20 in the past few weeks alone — and nobody can figure out why. [...] Many suffered from seizures, head tremors and paralysis [...] Many of the eagles were brought to the mammoth Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah [...] Within 48 hours, most were dead. [...] State wildlife specialists are baffled. [...] At first, the agency’s disease scientists guessed the illness could be encephalitis, which is caused by the West Nile virus, but later ruled out that possibility. [...] Officials at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center have their own theories. Some point to radiation from Japan after the 2011 meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. [...] A call from Idaho shed new light: A wildlife official said bald eagles there were also getting sick, suggesting the birds were arriving in Utah already in bad health.

Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah’s Facebook page:

Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah’s Facebook page

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Dec 29

See also:

- Mystery Illness Killing Bald Eagles In Western U.S. – Wings Paralyzed, Full Blown Seizures


- Newspaper: Unprecedented declines in Alaska king salmon… related to impact from Fukushima? No comment, says NOAA biologist — Record low numbers seen in major fishery on Canada’s west coast, “alarming decrease” (ENENews, Dec 29, 2013):

Juneau Empire, Dec. 29, 2013: [...] the king [chinook] salmon — has fallen from its throne. [...] Alaska has seen unprecedented declines in recent years [...] scientists like Joe Orsi and Jim Murphy, both fisheries research biologists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, are digging deeper into [...] the cause of the startling downward trend. [...] When asked about the potential impact Fukushima may be having on king salmon stocks in the Gulf of Alaska and elsewhere in the state, Orsi would not comment. “I’ve been told to refer you to the (Environmental Protection Agency),” he said, “Because I’m not an expert on the topic.” Calls and emails to the EPA were not returned in time and digging on the federal agency’s site revealed no current information on radiation from the Fukushima disaster. The last posted monitoring results occurred in June of 2011.

img_483-Dec.-29-18.41-300x227

Bellingham Herald, Dec. 5, 2013: “[...] we see from test fisheries that the Chinook numbers returning to the Fraser River system were at a record low,” explained Ken Balcomb, executive director and principal investigator for The Center for Research and a science advisor to the whale watch association. [...] [An] alarming decrease of an important identified food resource [...]

Islander Sound, Dec. 25, 2013: [A] dismal return of Chinook salmon to the Fraser River.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Dec 29

Bald Eagle in mid-air flight over Homer Spit Kenai Peninsula Alaska Winter

- ‘High Alert’: Mystery illness killing bald eagles in Western U.S. — Wings paralyzed, full blown seizures — Experts: “Very big concern”… “Never seen anything like this”… “It’s something new”… “We just don’t know what’s going on” (VIDEOS) (ENENews, dec 29, 2013):

KUTV, Dec. 28, 2013: Wildlife experts are on high alert as more bald eagles are found suffering from a mysterious illness [...] It’s a very big concern. Wildlife experts have never seen anything like this before with bald eagles. […] Wildlife experts have never seen bald eagles suffer like this before in Utah and scientists are unsure of what is making them ill.

KSTU, Dec. 15, 2013: Officials thought the symptoms might have been from lead poisoning, but that doesn’t appear to be the case. [...] “I don’t think words can describe what you see and what you feel, and the helplessness and trying to figure out what’s going on,” [DaLyn Erickson, executive director at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah] said. Symptoms suffered by the birds include, leg paralysis, wing paralysis, head tremors and seizures.

Mystery illness killing bald eagles in Western U.S

WTMJ, Dec. 26, 2013: Wildlife experts say they’ve never seen anything like this before. [...] “Weakness in the legs, weakness in the wings. And then very quickly move into having tremors, and then full blown seizures.”

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , ,

Dec 25

“The microbe (germ) is nothing. The terrain (milieu) is everything.”

Every dolphin is heavily contaminated with mercury.

See also:

- The Cove – Oscar Award Winner (‘Best Documentary’)


dolphin1

- Virus Kills Over 1,000 Bottlenose Dolphins Along US East Coast (Business Insider/Reuters, Dec 23, 2013):

ORLANDO (Reuters) – More than 1,000 migratory bottlenose dolphins have died from a measles-like virus along the U.S. Eastern Seaboard in 2013 and the epidemic shows no sign of abating, a marine biologist said on Monday.The death toll exceeds the 740 dolphins killed during the last big outbreak of the then-unknown virus in 1987-88.

“It is having a significant impact and that is something we’re monitoring closely,” said Erin Fougeres, a marine mammal biologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , ,