Jul 25

- Gov’t reports “big, big decline” in Alaska caribou — “Mortality very high” after Fukushima releases began — “Low survival rate” for calves also in 2011 and 2012 — Official: “Worrisome” how quickly this happened… In truth, we don’t have an answer why (AUDIO) (ENENews, July 23, 2014):

Alaska Department of Fish and Game, July 2014: Alaska‘s largest caribou herd, the Western Arctic Herd, numbered about 235,000 animals as of July 2013 [...] That’s down from 325,000 caribou estimated in the 2011 census [...] The recent census indicates a decline of about 27 percent [actually 27.7%] since 2011. Mortality was very high during 2011-2012 [...] In addition to high adult cow mortality during 2011-2012, survival of calves born during 2011 and 2012 was relatively low.

Jim Dau, ADF&G biologist who has worked with the herd for more than 25 years: “The herd size right now, as of 2013, was 235,000 caribou, and that’s down about 27% since 2011 — so, a big, big decline in the last two years.” Continue reading »

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Jun 25

GOT FOOD?


polar-bear

- “Megablizzard” forecast for eastern Australia (Ice Age Now, June 23, 2014):

“Best snowfalls in a decade.” Maybe the “storm of the century.”

- Aleutian volcanoes waking up (Ice Age Now, June 23, 2014):

Five volcanoes now simultaneously active, the most activity in 26 years.

- Record snowfall in Norway (Ice Age Now, June 23, 2014):

First time since records began that snow has been recorded in June.

- Surprise Snowstorm Clobbers Rockies (Ice Age Now, June 23, 2014):

June 20, 2014 – “A bizarre June snowstorm hit Glacier National Park in Montana and parts of Utah and Idaho this week,

- Confirmed – Earth’s protective magnetic shield is weakening (Ice Age Now, June 22, 2014):

The most dramatic declines are occurring over the Western Hemisphere, says European Space Agency. Continue reading »

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May 15

- USAF Dismantling HAARP, Admits They Can Control Ionosphere (Video) (Before It’s News, May 15, 2014):

via ADN by Dermot Cole

The U.S. Air Force gave official notice to Congress Wednesday that it intends to dismantle the $300 million High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program in Gakona this summer.

The shutdown of HAARP, a project created by the late Sen. Ted Stevens when he wielded great control over the U.S. defense budget, will start after a final research experiment takes place in mid-June, the Air Force said in a letter to Congress Tuesday.

Responding to questions from Sen. Lisa Murkowski during a Senate hearing Wednesday, David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, said this is “not an area that we have any need for in the future” and it would not be a good use of Air Force research funds to keep HAARP going. “We’re moving on to other ways of managing the ionosphere, which the HAARP was really designed to do,” he said. “To inject energy into the ionosphere to be able to actually control it. But that work has been completed.”

Continue reading »

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May 15

FYI.


- Alaska’s aquatic, marine life dying off due to widespread contamination – expert (Voice of Russia, May 14, 2014):

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation is beating the drum against marine ecosystem contamination after the most recent examination of soil and water at Seward Ship’s Drydock has shown the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metals and petroleum byproducts.

Continue reading »

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May 11

Japan-sea-creatures

- Professor: Concerns Fukushima is impacting Alaska; “Unusual animals showing up dead… Seals with unknown disease… first cases of avian cholera” — NOAA: ‘Rare whale beachings’ in Alaska under investigation — Japan Paper: Mysterious sea creatures found one after another along coast (PHOTOS) (ENENews, May 10, 2014):

Nome Nugget, Mar. 27, 2014: Radiation sampling to happen for Bering Strait — Regional concerns about the possibility that Bering Sea waters could be radioactively contaminated [...] “People throughout our region have repeatedly asked for testing of our subsistence foods and water,” said [University of Alaska, Fairbanks professor Gay Sheffield]. “Seals fell sick with a still unknown disease, we’ve had the documented first cases of avian cholera in Alaska, we’ve had unusual animals like the beaked whale showing up dead on the beach near Gambell and each time people throughout the region expressed concerns about the effects of Fukushima either in the air, and now with the approaching plume in the water,” said Sheffield. [...] Gambell Tribal President Eddie Ungott agreed and said that his village is very concerned about radiation. [...] IRA President Paul Rookok, Sr. said they are worried about the health of marine mammals [...]
Continue reading »

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Apr 19

- NBC: Record level of sick or injured California seals and sea lions turning up — “The numbers are extraordinary” — “Scientists worried… The worst kind of perfect storm” — Pups should be weighing 2 or 3 times as much, “severely malnourished” (VIDEO) (ENENews, April 18, 2014):

NBC Bay Area, Apr. 18, 2014: Seals and sea lions in California are turning up sick or injured at a record pace this year. Sausalito’s Marine Mammal Center has more animals in its care right now than ever before in its 39-year history. There are three factors at play: First of all, this is the time of year when pups get stranded or separated from their mothers for an unknown reason. Also last year’s sea lion epidemic sent malnourished, sick pups onto California shores at record levels. On top of that, a Monterey Bay algae bloom is making a lot of animals sick. Experts say it’s creating the worst kind of perfect storm.

Continue reading »

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Mar 23

- Nearly 6,200 People Sign White House Petition for Alaska to Secede and Join Russia (The Daily Sheeple, March 22, 2014):

“We the People,” the White House’s online petition website that claims it is “giving all Americans a way to engage their government on the issues that matter to them,”  is currently hosting a petition for Alaska to leave the United States and join Russia.

Nearly 6,200 People Sign White House Petition for Alaska to Secede and Join Russia

The petition, written by S. V. of Anchorage, simply reads: Continue reading »

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Mar 16

H/t reader M.G.:

“On a grave, far more life threating note……..an update on Fukushima. Fairbanks, Alaska passes a resolution to monitor radiation………the governments do and say nothing. Cities monitoring three years later……it is a bit late, and won’t solve a thing.”

From the article:

“Larry Hartig, the state commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation [said] People ingest more radiation from eating a banana than from eating a tuna.”

Really?

Cesium-137 emits 10 million times more radiation per unit volume than does potassium-40 found in a banana.


- Fairbanks city council unanimously passes Fukushima monitoring resolution: Alaska and U.S. West Coast in danger — “No safe levels of radiation… constitutes grave risk” — Alaska Senator: “We need to be vigilant” (AUDIO) (ENENews, March 15, 2014):

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Mar. 10, 2014 (h/t Anonymous tip): Council to ask for more radiation testing [...] [Fairbanks city] council will consider a resolution tonight that calls on the federal government and United Nations to do more radiation testing in Alaska waters. It asserts that health risks related to nuclear meltdown have been vastly understated [...]

Continue reading »

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Jan 29

- Alaska Professor on Radio: Fukushima fallout a suspected factor in ‘unusual mortality’ of seals and walrus — We couldn’t test for plutonium (Audio) (ENENews, Jan 28, 2014):

Alaska Public Radio, Jan. 28, 2014 (at 4:30 in):

Fukushima Fallout A Suspected Factor In Unusual Mortality Of Seals And Walrus

In the days and weeks following 3/11, cesium-134 levels were roughly equal to cesium-137 levels. It is highly unlikely that cesium-134 was detected in the seals from the 1990s. If cesium-137 levels were comparable, adding in the cesium-134 means the 2011 seals should have about double the total cesium levels than the seals from the 1990s.

Continue reading »

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Jan 28

Alaska Salmon - Fukushima

- Reports from Alaska: Many salmon with strange growths inside, concerns about health and safety — “Skin illness on white fish raise concerns… Never caught any like this” — Gov’t predicts ‘catastrophic’ king salmon run (PHOTOS) (ENENews, Jan 28, 2014):

Local Environmental Observers (LEO) Network, Updated Dec. 12, 2013 (emphasis added): Unusual growth observed in salmon tissue — Hydaburg, Alaska, August 12, 2013 (salmon) We have found strange growths in the flesh or meat of salmon. We were fishing for cohos (silver salmon) at the mouth of the Hydaburg River with line and reel. I caught about thirty fish. Most were fine but eight [...] were filled up inside with strange growths that were either white or pink in color. On the outside the fish looked fine. The growths looked kind of like individual little salmon eggs, and about the same size. Other people were seeing the same kind of growths in their fish as well.  We have only seen this in the cohos and not with the other fish (pink salmon, dog salmon, steel head or trout).  We are seeing many coho salmon with these growths, and we are concerned about the health of the fish and the safety of the food. Brian Holter Jr, LEO [...] says: this observation has been forwarded to the Fish Pathology Lab at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. According to lab staff, they may be able to determine the condition of the fish with a photograph. Lab staff are available for consultation.

Continue reading »

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Jan 28

- Conditions never seen before by scientists in Pacific seals and walrus — Thyroid cysts, lesions of reproductive system, retained placenta — Hunters concerned — Oceanographers to discuss radiation from Fukushima on Alaska radio tomorrow (ENENews, Jan 27, 2014):

Alaska Marine Science Symposium (pdf), Jan. 20-24, 2014: Incidental Gross Necropsy Findings In Subsistence Harvested Ice Seals And Pacific Walrus [...] Ice seals (ringed, bearded, spotted seals) and Pacific walrus are very important subsistence species for Arctic coastal communities. As part of the North Slope Borough (NSB) ongoing Marine Mammal Health Research program, the department of wildlife management conducts necropsies and baseline tissue sampling on subsistence harvested marine mammals. We present some results from our 2011-2013 general ice seal [ringed, bearded, and spotted] and Pacific walrus subsistence harvest monitoring and sampling efforts due to hunter concern NOTE: Case reports (type 1 alopecia/delayed molt; type II ulcerative dermatitis, delayed molt etc.) from the ongoing 2011 Northern Pinniped unusual mortality event disease investigation were not included and will be reported elsewhere. Results: Incidental gross findings among the three species included: lesions of the reproductive system (adnexal cysts, uterine and penile melanosis, cliteromegaly, cryptorchism, retained placenta), endocrine system (thyroid cysts, adrenal nodules), musculoskeletal system (synovial cyst), integumentary system (panniculitis, epidermal molt (aka dreadlocks), skin sloughing) and digestive system (microdontia; chronic interstitial pancreatitis, hepatic cyst; cholestatic jaundice; geophagia). Helminths were commonly observed in the gastrointestinal system of ice seals [...] A variety of the observed pathological conditions (reproductive and endocrine lesions) are reported for the first time in Arctic Pinnipeds [...] Continue reading »

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Jan 26

- Reports: White ‘goo’ everywhere in Alaska seal, crows won’t touch it… yet they eat people’s roofs — Slime in ones mouth, kidney almost black — Another appeared to change color — Hairless one seen recently: “We all still have sick seals here!” (PHOTOS) (ENENews, Jan 26, 2014)

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Jan 26

University of Alaska Scientists: Fukushima Radiation May Be Making Alaska Seals Sick (ZeroHedge, Jan 25, 2014):

Preface: Leading Scientist On Fukushima Radiation Hitting West Coast of North America: “No One Is Measuring So Therefore We Should Be Alarmed”

American sailors on the USS Reagan got really sick after having snowball fights with radioactive snow blowing off of the coasts of Fukushima.

University of Alaska professors Doug Dasher, John Kelley, Gay Sheffield, and Raphaela Stimmelmayr theorize that radioactive snow might have also caused Alaska’s seals to become sick (page 222): Continue reading »

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Jan 25

AL_seals6

- Just In: Scientists present links between unusual Alaska seal deaths and Fukushima fallout — Skin lesions, hair loss, lethargy — ‘Pulsed release’ when built-up radionuclides were set free as ice melted — “Wildlife health implications” due to radiation exposure discussed (PHOTOS & MAP) (ENENews, Jan 25, 2014):

Alaska Marine Science Symposium (pdf), Jan. 20-24, 2014 (emphasis added): 2011 Fukushima Fall Out: Aerial Deposition On To Sea Ice Scenario And Wildlife Health Implications To Ice-Associated Seals (Dr. Doug Dasher, John Kelley, Gay Sheffield,  Raphaela Stimmelmayr) — On March 11, 2011 off Japan’s west coast, an earthquake-generated tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulting in a major nuclear accident that included a large release of airborne radionuclides into the environment. Within five days of the accident atmospheric air masses carrying Fukushima radiation were transiting into the northern Bering and Chukchi seas. During summer 2011 it became evident to coastal communities and wildlife management agencies that there was a novel disease outbreak occurring in several species of Arctic ice-associated seals. Gross symptoms associated with the disease included lethargy, no new hair growth, and skin lesions, with the majority of the outbreak reports occurring between the Nome and Barrow region. NOAA and USFWS declared an Alaska Northern Pinnipeds Usual Mortality Event (UME) in late winter of 2011. The ongoing Alaska 2011 Northern Pinnipeds UME investigation continues to explore a mix of potential etiologies (infectious, endocrine, toxins, nutritious etc.), including radioactivity. Currently, the underlying etiology remains undetermined. We present results on gamma analysis (cesium 134 and 137) of muscle tissue from control and diseased seals, and discuss wildlife health implications from different possible routes of exposure to Fukushima fallout to ice seals. Since the Fukushima fallout period occurred during the annual sea ice cover period from Nome to Barrow, a sea ice based fallout scenario in addition to a marine food web based one is of particular relevance for the Fukushima accident. Under a proposed sea ice fallout deposition scenario, radionuclides would have been settled onto sea ice. Sea ice and snow would have acted as a temporary refuge for deposited radionuclides; thus radionuclides would have only become available for migration during the melting season and would not have entered the regional food web in any appreciable manner until breakup (pulsed release). The cumulative on-ice exposure for ice seals would have occurred through external, inhalation, and non-equilibrium dietary pathwaysduring the ice-based seasonal spring haulout period for molting/pupping/breeding activities. Additionally, ice seals would have been under dietary/metabolic constraints and experiencing hormonal changes associated with reproduction and molting. Continue reading »

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Jan 24

- Alaska Marine Expert: We really need to look at what’s happening to ecosystem from Fukushima radiation — Models don’t address ongoing releases at plant — “A lot of unknowns, a lot of uncertainties” — Ships are sampling for everything but radionuclides — Could be affecting animals (AUDIO) (ENENews, Jan 23, 2014):

Doug Dasher, University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher, Nov. 6, 2013:

At 7:00 in

The concern has been we have these models indicating the potential for levels to increase, potentially up to what they saw in the levels in the North Pacific during the 1960s nuclear testing. That still would not indicate an immediate health problem or exceeding the FDA guidelines. But there’s a lot of unknowns, a lot of uncertainties. There are others that also have the same message that they want to get out, we really need to sample to understand this and we really need to look at what’s happening out there in the ecosystem at the same time. There’s an opportunity to do this. It’s a huge amount of initial release, and the models do not address the continuing release. Fukushima has continued to leak […] Run-off problems from the water they’re trying to pump out and contain on the site. The tanks are leaking, several typhoons have been through there this year. […] So there’s a lot of things taking place, it’s not a stable site. There’s that issue too, which we need to know what’s going on there now, so in case something else happens, we can be better prepared for it. And account for the accumulating long term leakage for at least the next couple of years as it continues to occur. Continue reading »

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Jan 16

Related info:

- Arnie Gundersen: I’m now not eating Pacific Ocean fish — Bio-accumulation of Fukushima nuclear waste concerning — Effects of lower-level radiation worse than predicted


- NPR Affiliate: Fukushima cesium detected in Alaska salmon sample — Radioactive plume has already reached West Coast — Concerned fishermen forced to pay for tests since officials not doing it — “People don’t trust gov’t… they don’t trust corporations” (AUDIO) (ENENews, Jan 16, 2014):

Loki Fish Co., Jan. 7, 2014: [...] In response to customer concerns over radiation releases into the Pacific Ocean from Fukushima, fisherman-owned Loki Fish Company [paid for] radiation testing on seven stocks of wild salmon. [...] Although the FDA contends that there is no evidence that radionuclides from Fukushima are present in Alaskan and Pacific Northwest seafood at a level that would be harmful to human health, it has not published results. [...] Of the seven samples, five did not register detectable levels of radionuclides. Two of the samples registered at trace levels – Alaskan Keta at 1.4Bq/kg for Cesium 137, and Alaskan Pink at 1.2Bq/kg for Cesium 134 [Cesium-134 is a "clear fingerprint" for Fukushima's nuclear contamination].

Continue reading »

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Jan 15

Flashback:

- Government Report: Fukushima Ocean Plume Hit Canada 6 Months Ago – ‘Precedes Model Predictions By Several Years’


- ‘Pitiful’: Fukushima plume hitting West Coast and Alaska ‘any day now’ — No gov’t agency is monitoring ocean, “public has right to know” — We have to watch seafood and food web over the future (VIDEO) (ENENews, Jan 15, 2014):

Cape Cod Online, Jan. 1, 2013: The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has launched a new citizen website to pay the cost of testing Pacific Ocean water for levels of radioactivity. The idea is to help the public keep a close eye on a plume of water containing radionuclides [...] WHOI senior scientist Ken Buesseler said during a teleconference Tuesday. The [Fukushima Daiichi] power plant was badly damaged in the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami and has been leaking radioactive water into the ocean ever since. Water containing radioactive cesium-134 should be hitting the U.S. West Coast including Alaska any day now, but it’s hard to know for sure since no U.S. government agency is responsible for monitoring radioactivity in the ocean, Buesseler said. He believes the radiation will be too diluted after traveling 5,000 miles across the Pacific to have an impact on American fishing and recreational activities. But Buesseler said the American public has the right to know what the radiation levels actually are.

Continue reading »

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Dec 23

- Previously unpublished 2012 Fukushima plume map from gov’t scientists: “Radioactivity will almost entirely shift to eastern N. Pacific” – Rhodes Scholar: No one can imagine what effects radiation flowing into ocean will have on sea life and ‘other things’ (VIDEO) (ENENews, Dec 23, 2013):

Radionuclide Transport from Fukushima to Eastern North Pacific, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 2013 PICES Annual Meeting on Oct. 15, 2013:

  • Main inventory of Fukushima 137Cs had been transported towards central North Pacific By 2012. […] The inventory of Fukushima radioactivity will almost entirely shift from the western to the eastern North Pacific during the next 5 years.
  • Surface water distribution of Fukushima 137Cs in 2012 (Aoyama et al., 2013; G. Hong, pers. comm. [personal communication]):

Previously Unpublished 2012 Fukushima Plume Map From Government Scientists Shows Alaska Coast Already Being Impacted

Interview with Alex Kerr, “[Rhodes] scholar, linguist, specialist and prize winner” -Japan Times, Dec. 23, 2013:

At 1:30 in

[…] the radioactivity that’s flowing into the ocean — no one can imagine what the long-term effects are going to be on sea life — and many other things. [...]

Watch the broadcast here

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Dec 12

- Large die-off of Alaska seabirds from disease never found before in state history — Official: It’s super, super common… except it’s first time — Hundreds dead per km²; Continued to wash ashore — ‘Relatively’ natural; Witness: Head flopped backward, appeared to have seizure, then dropped dead (AUDIO) (ENENews, Dec 12, 2013):

Anchorage Daily News: Hundreds of dead sea birds found on the beaches of St. Lawrence Island were the victims of Alaska’s first detected avian cholera outbreak, officials said this week. One hunter in Gambell spotted a bird on the beach, its head flopping backward [...] The bird acted like it was having a seizure. Then it dropped dead. [...] Gay Sheffield, a Nome-based biologist with the University of Alaska’s Marine Advisory Program [...] received three bird carcasses: a northern fulmar [...] a thick-billed murre [...] and a black crested auklet [...] “For this disease, actually, these numbers are really small, which makes me think there’s a lot more birds that died somewhere else that we didn’t see” [said Kimberlee Beckmen, Fish & Game veterinarian.]

“It’s super, super common” (except it’s the first time)

“It’s not something that can hurt people” (but wear gloves, wash hands, and never eat  it)

  • Cathie Harms, a wildlife biologist with ADF&G: “The good news is although birds died, it’s not something that can hurt people”
  • AP: Officials warn anyone touching a sick bird or animal to wear gloves and wash hands with soap and water after handling animals or butchering meat. Never eat sick birds or animals that may have died from a disease.

Continue reading »

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Dec 09

- SF Chronicle: Fukushima radiation possible culprit in huge starfish die off from Mexico to Alaska — Potential catastrophe, it’s extremely virulent “going on up and down coast… It’s going to change what’s out there pretty fundamentally” (ENENews, Dec 9, 2013):

San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 9, 2013: A mysterious pathogen is wiping out starfish along the Pacific coast, a potential catastrophe that has flummoxed marine biologists [...] [They're] disappearing from large areas along the coast [...] Nobody knows what is causing the die-off, but the killer – most likely some kind of virus, bacteria or pollutant – is widespread and extremely virulent. It has ravaged a variety of starfish species in tide pools and in deeper water along the coast from Mexico to Alaska. [...] The disease has spread from the shoreline into deeper water [...] The disease has even found its way through the filtration system of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which uses sea water in its tanks [and] cannot keep out natural impurities. “There is something going on in the water,” [Michael Murray, the director of veterinary services] said.

Continue reading »

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Nov 28

- Expansive ‘death zone’ of birds on Alaska island, perhaps thousands washed ashore — Resident: Radiation’s always on the backs of our minds — Samples sent to lab for testing — Reporter: ‘Facebook alarmists’ fear Fukushima to blame (ENENews, Nov 27, 2013):

Alaska Dispatch, Nov. 26, 2013: Hundreds of dead seabirds wash ashore on Alaska island in Bering Sea [...] perhaps thousands [...] following storms that slammed into Western Alaska earlier this month and littered stretches of St. Lawrence Island with the carcasses of crested auklets, murres, ducks and other birds. Facebook alarmists feared Fukushima radiation was to blame [...] The expanse of the death zone and the variety of birds — cormorants and northern fulmars were also found — suggest storms that recently lashed the region with powerful gusts may be the culprit, said [Peter Bente, a state wildlife biologist] [...] Still, samples of the carcasses were sent to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., for testing. [...] The victims were nearly all young [...] scores of dead and sick ringed seals — some with open wounds, unusual hair loss and internal ulcers — that began washing up in summer 2011 in Western Alaska. Even today, a few seals continue to trickle ashore [...]

Perry Pungowiyi, an island resident: “[Radiation's] always on the backs of our minds.”

Continue reading »

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Nov 16

Related info:

- Alaska Island Shows Impacts From Fukushima – ‘Significant Cesium Isotope Signature’ Detected – Scientists Anticipate More Marine Life To Be Impacted As Ocean Plume Arrives


- Researchers: Skin ulcers on Alaska wildlife after Fukushima were never observed before — Also reported in seals from Japan — We couldn’t document fallout pattern when plumes hit and animals were on the ice (AUDIO) (ENENews, Nov 16, 2013):

Doug Dasher, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Nov. 6, 2013 (at 10:00 in): We also worked with the North Slope Borough on the Unusual Mortality Event with the ringed seals. [...] We didn’t see any radiation levels in the seal tissues that would indicate levels of radiation that should have caused the lesions and illnesses that they saw on the seals, but we couldn’t document what the fallout pattern would have been at this time the seals were on the ice when the Fukushima plumes were passing that area. Nor to my knowledge has there been any definitive virus or otherwise defined as to what exactly affected the seals at that time. Continue reading »

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Nov 14


Lichen sample from mid-2011 expressed in picocuries/kilogram — Lichen on  the island had less than 70 pCi/kg of Cs-137 in 1997.

- US Gov’t Headline: Alaska island “appears to show impacts from Fukushima” — “Significant cesium isotope signature” detected — Scientists anticipate more marine life to be impacted as ocean plume arrives (VIDEO) (ENENews, Nov 14, 2013):

Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results, September 2013: To determine what [Fukushima Dai-ichi's] direct release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere might have contributed to the background radiation on Amchitka and Adak Islands, semiquantitative gamma spectrometry measurements were made [...] The results imply that Dolly Varden [a type of fish], rockweed, and to a lesser extent, Irish lord [a type of fish] appear to contain a significant cesium isotope signature from Fukushima Dai-ichi. The estimated 134Cs/137Cs activity ratios in pooled fauna samples at the time sampled ranged from <30 to about 60 percent. Observations of Fukushima-derived fallout impacting on this region are supported by findings of elevated levels of 134Cs (and 137Cs) in lichen and soil collected from both the Adak and Amchitka regions. [...]

Department of Energy: Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident [...] The U.S. Department of Energy Office Legacy Management (LM) has a long-term stewardship mission to protect human health and the environment from the legacy of underground nuclear testing conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska, from 1965 to 1971. [...] Atmospheric monitoring in the United States showed elevated cesium activities shortly after the [Fukushima] nuclear incident. LM scientists anticipated that atmospheric transport of cesium would potentially increase the cesium activities in the 2011 biological samples collected near Amchitka. Because cesium-134 has a relatively short half-life of 2 years and indicates leakage from a nuclear reactor, it is a clear indicator of a recent nuclear accident [...] Because the Amchitka 2011 sampling event occurred soon after the Fukushima nuclear accident, the biota impacted by atmospheric precipitation showed the greatest impact (e.g., species that live in freshwater or shallow ocean waters) when compared to marine biota living in deeper water. This is because ocean currents are a slower transport process than wind currents. LM scientists anticipate that the marine biota will show the impacts of Fukushima during the next sampling event, currently scheduled to occur in 2016. [...]

Watch the DoE video describing the 2011 monitoring event here

Related info:
Continue reading »

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Nov 03

‘Is The Food Supply Safe?’

Is radiation safe? (And that really should be a rhetorical question.)


- CBC Headline: Radiation from Fukushima arrives on Alaska coast — University scientists concerned — “Is the food supply safe?… I don’t think anyone can really answer that” (ENENews, Nov 3, 2013):

CBC News, Nov. 2, 2013: Radiation from Japan nuclear plant arrives on Alaska coast [...] Scientists at the University of Alaska are concerned about radiation leaking from Japan’s damaged Fukushima nuclear plant, and the lack of a monitoring plan. Some radiation has arrived in northern Alaska and along the west coast. That’s raised concern over contamination of fish and wildlife. More may be heading toward coastal communities [...]

John Kelley, professor emeritus at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks: “The data they will need is not only past data but current data, and if no one is sampling anything then we won’t really know it, will we? The general concern was, is the food supply safe? And I don’t think anyone can really answer that definitively.”

Douglas Dasher, researcher at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks: “The levels they are projecting in some of the models are in the ballpark of what they saw in the North Pacific in the 1960s.”

Recent reports have noted health problems in Alaskan wildlife, including seals, polar bears, walruses, whales, and sea stars. Continue reading »

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Oct 26

- Head researcher “is sounding the alarm” over striking changes in killer whales off Canada and Alaska since 2011 — “Unusually high mortality rate” and “odd behavior” — “Experts fear something’s wrong with the environment” (VIDEO) (ENENews, Oct 25, 2013):

Vancouver Sun, Oct. 24, 2013: There have been some puzzling changes in the behaviour of northern resident killer whales that live off the north-central coast of British Columbia and Alaska, says a marine mammal scientist from the Vancouver Aquarium. [...] “They weren’t vocalizing, and that was quite a striking change after years and years of being very familiar with how noisy they are and how easy to find acoustically,” [Dr. Lance] Barrett-Lennard said Thursday. [...] The team has also noticed an unusually high mortality rate among pod matriarchs, with seven or eight deaths among older females in the pod in the past two years. Normally, the team notices one or two deaths per year. The deaths are likely coincidental and not linked, he said [...]

KOMO News, Oct. 24, 2013: [...] Dr. Lance Barrett-Lennard says he fears changes in the ocean environment are prompting odd behaviour and an unusually high mortality rate. [...] Barrett-Lennard says the changes are striking and need further study. The alarming observations come on the heels of a study revealing that the number of killer whales in Puget Sound is dwindling – especially among reproductive age males. [...]

Continue reading »

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Oct 23

- 28 Signs That The West Coast Is Being Absolutely Fried With Nuclear Radiation From Fukushima (The Truth, Oct 21, 2013):

The map above comes from the Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center.  It shows that radiation levels at radiation monitoring stations all over the country are elevated.  As you will notice, this is particularly true along the west coast of the United States.  Every single day, 300 tons of radioactive water from Fukushima enters the Pacific Ocean.  That means that the total amouont of radioactive material released from Fukushima is constantly increasing, and it is steadily building up in our food chain.  Ultimately, all of this nuclear radiation will outlive all of us by a very wide margin.  They are saying that it could take up to 40 years to clean up the Fukushima disaster, and meanwhile countless innocent people will develop cancer and other health problems as a result of exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation.  We are talking about a nuclear disaster that is absolutely unprecedented, and it is constantly getting worse.

The following are 28 signs that the west coast of North America is being absolutely fried with nuclear radiation from Fukushima… Continue reading »

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May 26

In other news:

- April 2013 Alaska Weather Summary: Precipitation, temperature and snowfall records set in April (SitNews, May 23, 2013)


- Alaska Continues Its Record Long, Snowy Winter (Heartlander Magazine, May 20, 2013):

Anchorage, Alaska set a record last week for its longest snow season on record. The city also set a record for its lowest May 17 maximum temperature.

Global warming activists often claim Alaska is among the places most negatively affected by warming temperatures. In his movie, “An Inconvenient Truth,” Al Gore claimed warming temperatures are melting the Alaska tundra and destroying homes and infrastructure. Just last week, the media trumpeted a sensationalist article by Suzanne Goldenberg of the Guardian claiming warming temperatures are poised to create Alaskan climate refugees. The truth is an entirely different story.

Spring 2013 has been remarkably cold and snowy in Alaska. Indeed, cold temperatures and excessively abundant snowfall have dogged the state throughout the past several years.

“Forget global warming, Alaska is headed for an ice age, the Alaska Dispatch reported December 23.

“In the first decade since 2000, the 49th state cooled 2.4 degrees Fahrenheit,” the Dispatch observed.

Not even summer provided a break from Alaska’s ongoing record cold last year.

“After a record-breaking winter, we are now headed for one of the coldest months of July on record. And it has some Alaskans thinking it may be time to leave the great land,” Alaska television station KTVA reported last July16.

“The 90-day period from May 1 to July 29 saw the lowest daily high temperatures on average in Juneau since officials began keeping records in 1943, according to National Weather Service data,” the Juneau Empire reported last July 31.

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Apr 03

- Study: 28% Increase In Thyroid Problems In Babies Born After Fukushima in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington (ZeroHedge, April 3, 2013):

Infants are much more vulnerable to radiation than adults. And see this.However, radiation safety standards are set based on the assumption that everyone in the world is a healthy man in his 20s.

Now, a medical doctor (Janette D. Sherman, M. D.) and epidemiologist (Joseph Mangano) have released a study showing a 28% increase in thyroid problems in babies born in Hawaii and America’s West Coast after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

Janette Sherman, M.D. worked for the Atomic Energy Commission (forerunner of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) at the University of California in Berkeley, and for the U.S. Navy Radiation Defense Laboratory in San Francisco. She served on the EPA’s advisory board for 6 years, and has been an advisor to the National Cancer Institute on breast cancer. Dr. Sherman specializes in internal medicine and toxicology with an emphasis on chemicals and nuclear radiation.

Joseph J. Mangano is a public health administrator and researcher who has studied the connection between low-dose radiation exposure and subsequent risk of diseases such as cancer and damage to newborns. He has published numerous articles and letters in medical and other journals in addition to books, including Low Level Radiation and Immune System Disorders: An Atomic Era Legacy.

Their new study – published in the Open Journal of Pediatrics – is entitled “Elevated airborne beta levels in Pacific/West Coast US States and trends in hypothyroidism among newborns after the Fukushima nuclear meltdown.”

Common Dreams notes:

[The study found that] children born in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington between one week and 16 weeks after the meltdown began are 28 percent more likely to suffer from congenital hypothyroidism (CH) than were kids born in those states during the same period one year earlier.

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Jan 31

- Wave of Styrofoam from 2011 tsunami threatens Alaska environment (Reuters, Jan 30, 2013):

Alaska cleanup crews last year found some beaches covered with polystyrene foam that floated across the Pacific from the 2011 Japanese tsunami and threatens wildlife, a state official told legislators on Tuesday.

A main concern of environmentalists and officials is that the lightweight specks, which have been broken down by storms and waves, will harm small animals. They could choke or die slowly from malnutrition if pieces block their intestinal system, officials say.

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Jan 05

- What global warming? Alaska is headed for an ice age as scientists report state’s steady temperature decline (Daily Mail, Jan 3, 2013)

- Forget global warming, Alaska is headed for an ice age (Alaska Dispatch, Dec 23, 2012)

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