When Food is the Most Precious Commodity on Earth, Smart Contract Security is the Next Wave (Video)

H/t reader squodgy:

“Smart Contracts linked with crypto currencies to guarantee goods paid for BEFORE delivery?

I don’t think so, the vendor has to ensure delivery.

Funds must be placed with a middle man.”

Everything “smart” (Smartphone, smart meters, smart TV,…) is Agenda 21 & Agenda 2030.

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Florida Farmers Say Irma’s Damage Is The Worst They’ve Ever Seen

Florida Farmers Say Irma’s Damage Is The Worst They’ve Ever Seen:

Almost half of Florida’s citrus crops were destroyed during the hurricane and when Florida farmers survey the damage caused by Hurricane Irma, and most are saying it’s the worst destruction to their farms that they’ve ever seen.

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GMO Moths Shown to Fail Ahead of New York State Release

GM Moths Shown to Fail Ahead of New York State Release:

Cornell University’s plans to release genetically modified (GM) moths in New York State ignore existing evidence of failure, which shows the GM pests will damage the broccoli and cabbages they are supposed to protect, GeneWatch UK stated Monday.

Diamondback moth caterpillars are agricultural pests which eat brassica crops including cabbages and broccoli. Cornell plans multiple experimental releases of up to 30,000 GM male moths a week, over a two year period, at its New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES). The GM diamondback moths are produced by UK-headquartered company Oxitec, which was bought by Intrexon, Inc. for $160 million in 2015, despite its lack of revenue and commercial products.

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The Trump Administration’s False Promise to Rural America on GMOs

The Trump Administration’s False Promise to Rural America on GMOs:

According to a recent article, the Trump Administration intends to increase pressure on Europe and China to accept food containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). An Administration task force has been set up to advance these goals, despite a history of European resistance and caution in China.

Source: foodtank.com/news/ By Doug Gurian-Sherman

The Administration claims that GMOs should be accepted on scientific grounds. And it says that its motivation for this policy is to provide large benefits to rural economies that grow these crops, and sustainability. This is undoubtedly aimed at currying favor with an important Trump constituency. But on balance, science does not support the value of GMOs for rural society or sustainability in the U.S.—just the opposite. Several recent research studies have added to the mounting record of GMOs contributing to harmful industrial agriculture in the U.S.

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Agenda 21? California Ranchers Revolt After State Sets Aside 2 Million Acres For A Frog

California Ranchers Revolt After State Sets Aside 2 Million Acres For A Frog:

California is known for it’s wacky legislation.  After all, it is the state where Governor Jerry Brown recently signed a law specifically intended to regulate cow flatulence…no, really (see: Here Are Some Of The Ridiculous New State Laws That Will Take Effect January 1st – Happy New Year!).

As such, it will probably come as no surprise that the state recently set aside nearly 2 million acres (for those who have difficulty conceptualizing what 2 million acres looks like, it’s roughly 3x the size of Rhode Island) in order to protect a frog, the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog to be exact.

And while many will just dismiss this as the latest example of a far-leftist government gone mad, a group of California farmers and ranchers, who could very well be regulated out of business by this latest California law, are fighting back and have sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  More from The Sacramento Bee:

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Cities dumping human sewage on farm land across America is contaminating the food supply and destroying the ecosystem

Cities dumping human sewage on farm land across America is contaminating the food supply and destroying the ecosystem:

Since the EPA started promoting the “land application” of sewage sludge in 1993, millions of tons of this toxic biosludge have been spread on the farmland and public parks in our nation. It also sometimes makes its way to the organic compost and fertilizer section of your favorite garden supply store. What happens to it next? No one can say for sure because it is not tracked once it leaves the wastewater treatment plants and there is no national system for reporting problems related to it, but there is no doubt that is has the potential to cause significant harm given its contents.

One lawsuit from 2008 shows how pervasive this waste can be. In that case, a federal court acknowledged that sludge applications on a Georgia farm killed hundreds of dairy cattle and contaminated the supply of milk across several states. Federal Judge Anthony Alaimo said in his ruling that “senior EPA officials took extraordinary steps to quash scientific dissent and any questioning of EPA’s biosolids program.”

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The Drought Fighter: Could a controversial farmer in California have found the most effective way to grow food?

FYI.

The Drought Fighter:

Could a controversial farmer in California have found the most effective way to grow food in a warming world?

On Singing Frogs Farm, a relatively minuscule, 8-acre operation in Sebastopol, California, Paul Kaiser says he is grossing more than $100,000 an acre just by harvesting vegetables. This is an astronomical sum for an urban farmer in today’s world.

One afternoon last March, on a small vegetable farm that Paul Kaiser runs in a particularly chilly valley in Sebastopol, California, a group of agriculture specialists gathered around a four-foot steel pole. The experts had come to test the depth and quality of Kaiser’s top-soil, and one of them, a veteran farmer from the Central Valley named Tom Willey, leaned on the pole to push it into the dirt as far as he could. On a typical farm, the pole comes to a stop against infertile hard-pan in less than a foot. But in Kaiser’s field, the pole’s entire length slid into the ground, and Willey almost fell over. “Wow, that’s incredible,” he said, wondering if he’d hit a gopher hole. The whole group burst out laughing. “Do it again! Do it again!” said Jeff Mitchell, a longtime professor of agriculture at the University of California at Davis.

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