Jun 23

The Military Now Has X-Ray Guns

- The Military Now Has X-Ray Guns (Defense One, June 22, 2014):

Superman had X-ray vision. Now, so does the United States military, in the form of an X-ray gun that can see through fabric, rubber and aluminum to find drugs, money, explosive liquids and even people. The recently released X-ray gun is the first device of its kind that a soldier or would-be superhero can hold in her hands. It’s about the size of a breadbox and works with the press of a button, allowing the user to actually see the outline of organic material buried behind cloth, leather or even aluminum by running the X-ray gun over the material and zapping it with low-level X-rays. Continue reading »

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Jun 22

NSA111
Image: The NSA is not an independent agency nor does it merely answer to those in Washington. It is a manifestation of an overreaching corporatocracy that will stop at nothing to expand its various monopolies.
The key to defeating the NSA is not attacking it directly but by undermining and replacing the corporate interests that created it and direct it in the first place.

- Russia to Swap Intel-AMD Processors For Local Technology  (Activist Post, June 22, 2014):

Russia’s ITAR-TASS News Agency reported in an article titled, “Russia wants to replace US computer chips with local processors,” that:

Russia’s Industry and Trade Ministry plans to replace US microchips Intel and AMD, used in government’s computers, with domestically-produced micro processor Baikal in a project worth dozens of millions of dollars, business daily Kommersant reported Thursday.

It also stated:

The Baikal chips will be installed on computers of government bodies and in state-run firms, which purchase some 700,000 personal computers annually worth $500 million and 300,000 servers worth $800 million. The total volume of the market amounts to about 5 million devices worth $3.5 billion.

In addition to the obvious financial benefits for Russia of locally manufacturing processors, there are several other dimensions within which the move will be beneficial, including in terms of national security. Continue reading »

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Jun 22

- China Builds World’s Most Powerful Nuclear Reactor; Regulators “Overwhelmed” (ZeroHedge, June 22, 2014):

We are sure this will end well. Just as China took the ‘if we build it (on free credit), they will come’ growth model to extremes in real estate; it appears their ambitions in nuclear energy production are just as grandiose. However, just as they lost control of the real estate market, Bloomberg reports China is moving quickly to become the first country to operate the world’s most powerful atomic reactor even as France’s nuclear regulator says communication and cooperation on safety measures with its Chinese counterparts are lacking. France has a lot riding on a smooth roll out of China’s European Pressurized Reactors (EPRs) as it is home to Areva, which developed the next-gen reactor, and utility EdF, which oversees the project. French regulators, speaking in parliament, warned, “the Chinese safety authorities lack means. They are overwhelmed.

china-1

Not what you want to hear as the nation embarks on the biggest nuclear energy facility creation ever, “if too many nuclear power projects are started too quickly, it could jeopardize the healthy, long-term development of nuclear power…” and the Chinese (just ask the Japanese). Continue reading »

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Jun 20

- Meet The “Lone Engineer” GM Is Blaming All Its Troubles On (ZeroHedge, June 20, 2014):

Back in 2011 Goldman, when the FDIC-insured bank holding company with no deposits, was slapped with the biggest at the time SEC penalty for shorting CDOs it had sold to clients, it started a trend of scapegoating all its evils on a lone, then 20-something individual, Fabrice Tourre, who seemingly had “worked alone” and whose actions were not supervised by anyone: the chain of responsibility started and ended with him. Naturally, nobody went to jail. A few years later, stuck in the biggest scandal of its post-bankruppcy existence involving over 20 million recalls in just the first 6 months of 2014 alone, GM has decided that what worked for Goldman should work for it too, and as the WSJ reports, is “pinning of a decadelong failure to recall defective cars on a lone engineer.”

Unfortunately for GM, an organization that is far more politically charged than Goldman, it is “running into skepticism from lawmakers who say GM documents show dozens of people were alerted to ignition-switch defects during the past decade.”

But before we get into the details of what is set to be even more political theater, just who is this lone engineer? Continue reading »

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Jun 20

- The open source revolution is coming and it will conquer the 1% – ex CIA spy (Guardian, June 18, 2014):

The man who trained more than 66 countries in open source methods calls for re-invention of intelligence to re-engineer Earth

Robert David Steele, former Marine, CIA case officer, and US co-founder of the US Marine Corps intelligence activity, is a man on a mission. But it’s a mission that frightens the US intelligence establishment to its core.
With 18 years experience working across the US intelligence community, followed by 20 more years in commercial intelligence and training, Steele’s exemplary career has spanned almost all areas of both the clandestine world.

Steele started off as a Marine Corps infantry and intelligence officer. After four years on active duty, he joined the CIA for about a decade before co-founding the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity, where he was deputy director. Widely recognised as the leader of the Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) paradigm, Steele went on to write the handbooks on OSINT for NATO, the US Defense Intelligence Agency and the U.S. Special Operations Forces. In passing, he personally trained 7,500 officers from over 66 countries. Continue reading »

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Jun 20

- Riot control drone armed with paintballs and pepper spray hits market (RT, June 19, 2014):

With drones designed to contain ‘unruly crowds’ and ‘violent protests’, a South African company is bringing riot control to a whole new high-tech level. The unmanned aerial system is able to shoot pepper spray and non-lethal paintballs to mark offenders.

Desert Wolf, based in Pretoria, has begun selling its Skunk Riot Control Copter, a drone it says “is designed to control unruly crowds without endangering the lives of the protestors or the security staff.”

The UAS has four high-capacity gun barrels, capable of shooting up to 4,000 paintballs, pepper spray balls and solid plastic balls at rates of up to 80 balls per second. The company notes that the frequency should usually be between one and 20 balls per second, and that the high frequency of 80 “will only be used in an extreme ‘Life threatening situation’.” Continue reading »

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Jun 19

- Japan’s Plan To Freeze Fukushima With An “Ice Wall” Is Melting Down (ZeroHedge, June 18, 2014):

A year ago we wished TEPCO the best of luck with the construction of the “Game of Thrones”-esque 1.4km giant wall of ice that was designed to surround the exploded Fukushima power plant and slow the movement of irradiated water below the damaged reactors, preventing it from flowing over into the ocean and surrounding land. A plan so idiotic we were at a loss for words trying to list the ways it could go wrong.  And, as it turns out, making a project overly complicated and ridiculous doesn’t assure it will be a success. Quite the contrary. As Japan JIJI reports, Tepco said the project, which remains in its early stages, is experiencing a problem with an inner ice wall designed to contain highly radioactive water that is draining from the basements of the wrecked reactors. A Tepco spokesman added that “We have yet to form an ice plug because we can’t get the temperature low enough to freeze the water.”

 

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Jun 19

Researchers find thousands of secret keys in Android apps
Some of the secret keys, including Facebook and LinkedIn, were discovered by PlayDrone, a tool developed by Columbia Engineering researchers that uses hacking techniques to circumvent Google security to successfully download Google Play apps and recover their sources. Credit: Columbia Engineering

- Researchers find thousands of secret keys in Android apps (Phys.org, June 18, 2014):

In a paper presented—and awarded the prestigious Ken Sevcik Outstanding Student Paper Award—at the ACM SIGMETRICS conference on June 18, Jason Nieh, professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering, and PhD candidate Nicolas Viennot reported that they have discovered a crucial security problem in Google Play, the official Android app store where millions of users of Android, the most popular mobile platform, get their apps.

“Google Play has more than one million apps and over 50 billion app downloads, but no one reviews what gets put into Google Play—anyone can get a $25 account and upload whatever they want. Very little is known about what’s there at an aggregate level,” says Nieh, who is also a member of the University’s Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering’s Cybersecurity Center. “Given the huge popularity of Google Play and the potential risks to millions of users, we thought it was important to take a close look at Google Play content.” Continue reading »

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Jun 14

- Why Online Tracking Is Getting Creepier (ProPublica, June 12, 2014):

The marketers that follow you around the web are getting nosier.

Currently, many companies track where users go on the Web—often through cookies—in order to display customized ads. That’s why if you look at a pair of shoes on one site, ads for those shoes may follow you around the Web.

But online marketers are increasingly seeking to track users offline, as well, by collecting data about people’s offline habits—such as recent purchases, where you live, how many kids you have, and what kind of car you drive.

Onboarding: a ProPublica explainer of how online tracking is getting creepier. Follow ProPublica on Vine for more explainer shorts. (Icons courtesy of Lil Squid, André Renault, Gabriele Garofalo and Patrick Morrison, Noun Project)

Here’s how it works, according to some revealing marketing literature we came across from digital marketing firm LiveRamp: Continue reading »

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Jun 14

- Even Toilets Aren’t Safe as Hackers Target Home Devices (Bloomberg, June 10, 2014):

Come home to a hot iron and smoldering clothes this afternoon? Soon, it may not be a sign of forgetfulness, but rather evidence that you’ve been hacked.

In coming years, your smartphone will be able to lock your house, turn on the air conditioning, check whether the milk is out of date, or even heat up your iron. Great news, except that all that convenience could also let criminals open your doors, spy on your family or drive your connected car to their lair.

“As these technologies become more sophisticated, it opens up a broader spectrum of threats,” said Gunter Ollmann, chief technology officer of IOActive, a tech security firm in Seattle. A world of connected devices makes it possible “for the bad guys to have permanent entry into your household.”

What the industry calls “the Internet of things” has been heralded as the next wave of tech riches. By 2020, some 26 billion such devices may be connected to the Internet, up from 3 billion today, researcher Gartner Inc. (IT) estimates. That’s almost four times the number of smartphones, tablets and PCs that will be in use.

The vision is to connect almost everything — from cars to fridges, lamps, even toilets. Forget to flush? There’s an app for that. Continue reading »

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Jun 13

- ‘Unprecedented’: 13 aircraft mysteriously disappear from radars in heart of Europe (RT, June 12, 2014):

A total of 13 aircraft suddenly vanished off radars for about 25 minutes on two occasions over Austria and neighboring countries, Austria’s flight safety monitor said, calling for an EU probe into the “unprecedented” incidents.

The flights vanished from air traffic controllers’ screens in Austria on June 5 and June 10 for 25 minutes each time, Marcus Pohanka of Austro Control – Austria’s flight safety organization – said Thursday.

Air traffic control in neighboring regions of Germany and the Czech Republic also reported similar problems. Continue reading »

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Jun 13

- 3 “X-Class” Solar Flares Hit Earth; Disrupt Flights, Communications (ZeroHedge, June 12, 2014):

The sun has had three major “X-Class” solar flares on its surface in the past two days that have affected communications on Earth and could send a shockwave through Earth this Friday (the 13th), according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. As ABC reports, the “solar events” caused brief blackouts in high frequency communications when they struck, twice on Tuesday morning and once this morning.

As ABC notes,


ABC US News | ABC Celebrity News

And a close-up of the solar flares… Continue reading »

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Jun 12

- Massive flaw could have exposed every Gmail user’s address (RT, June 12, 2014):

A gaping security bug in Google’s systems may have been used to unearth millions upon millions of users’ email addresses. The activist claimed it took Google a month to rectify the problem after his report to the company.

Tel Aviv-based security researcher Oren Hafif discovered the bug and has informed Google, which has managed to resolve the problem.

However, before Hafif notified Google, he successfully retrieved some 37,000 addresses from the system.

“I have every reason to believe every Gmail address could have been mined,”
Hafif told Wired.

He uploaded a video tutorial to his YouTube account at the beginning of June.

Continue reading »

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Jun 12

- ‘Not a moment of privacy’: Drones to be used everywhere (RT, June 12, 2014):

As the first commercial drones are set to take to US airspace, aviation expert Richard Woodward predicts that unmanned aircraft are to become ubiquitous in taking up dirty or dangerous work, but also infringing on people’s privacy.

RT: When people hear the word drone, they get a little jittery. Is that justified? Why?

Richard Woodward: It is in some ways because they are about to become ubiquitous. There is going to be hundreds of thousands of these things. If there are any jobs that is dull, dirty or dangerous, you will find a drone doing it.

RT: Are there any risks to civilians with this?
Continue reading »

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Jun 12

fracking-diagram

- Will Fracking Cause our next Nuclear Disaster? (Global Research, June 9, 2014):

This article was first published byTruthout

The idea of storing radioactive nuclear waste inside a hollowed-out salt cavern might look good on paper. The concept is to carve out the insides of the caverns, deep underground, then carefully move in the waste. Over time, the logic goes, the salt will move in and insulate the containers for thousands of generations.

“The whole game is to engineer something that can contain those contaminants on the order of tens of thousands of years,” Tim Judson, the executive director of the Nuclear Information Resource Service(NIRS), told Truthout. NIRS is intended to be a national information and networking center for citizens and environmental activists concerned about nuclear power, radioactive waste, radiation and sustainable energy issues, according to Judson. Continue reading »

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Jun 05

H/t reader J.S.:

“What if gold became worthless?

Talk about a game changer.


- Gold Created Through ‘Advanced Metallurgy’? (Kitco, June 4, 2014)

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Jun 04

hubble-galaxies-one-shot-nasa.si

- Hubble telescope captures 10,000 galaxies in one amazing shot (RT, June 4, 2014):

Billed as “the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving universe,” the latest image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope is an explosion of color that depicts thousands of galaxies in the universe.

Released on Tuesday, the beautiful image is part of a survey exploring the Hubble Ultra Deep Field – a portion of space in the constellation Fornax that astronomers have been compiling for more than 10 years – and features approximately 10,000 galaxies. Continue reading »

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Jun 04

What could possibly go wrong?



Added: May 27, 2014

Description:

Fully autonomous driving has always been the goal of our project, because we think this could improve road safety and help lots of people who can’t drive.

We’re now developing prototypes of vehicles that have been designed from the ground up to drive themselves—just push a button and they’ll take you where you want to go! We’ll use these vehicles to test our software and learn what it will really take to bring this technology into the world.

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Jun 04

Sheerwind wind turbine

- Funny Looking Tower Generates 600% More Electrical Energy Than Traditional Wind Turbines (The Mind Unleashed, April 5, 2014):

The Sheerwind wind turbine promises to produce 6 times the electrical power than traditional wind turbines.

This funny looking wind tower acts like a funnel, directing the wind from any angle, down through a tube to a ground based turbine generator. The funneling of the wind through a narrow passage effectively creates a “jet effect” increasing the velocity of the wind, while lowering the pressure. This is called the Venturi Effect. This speeds up the wind turbine mounted inside the narrowest portion and generates electricity. Continue reading »

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Jun 03


Added: May 18, 2014

Description:

Video by Michael Naphan

It’s the roadway of the future! Feel inspired? Help us bring this project to the next step:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/so…

Check out our other videos for more info!

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May 31

Draganflyer X6

- LAPD acquires drone capability (RT, May 31, 2014):

For a city infamous for circling police helicopters, Los Angeles Police were surprisingly late to the drone game. All that has changed, however, as the department quietly added two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to its arsenal.

The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) announced they had acquired two Draganflyer X6 aircraft as “gifts” from the Seattle Police, the department said on Friday.

“These vehicles were purchased by the Seattle Police Department using federal grants. There was no cost to the city of Los Angeles,” CBS Los Angeles cites police as saying.

The 3.5-lbs. UAV, which looks like a small helicopter, is about three-feet-wide and boasts a camera, video recorder and infrared night-vision capabilities. Continue reading »

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May 28

Sure!


- DARPA introduces ‘invulnerable’ hack-proof drone (RT, May 28, 2014):

The Pentagon’s research arm has introduced a new unmanned drone with secure software that protects the control and navigation functions of the aircraft from a systems hack.

The Defense Advance Research Project Agency (DARPA) has developed the program – High Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) – over the last several years after it originated at the University of California San Diego and the University of Washington. The mini drone is made with software to thwart cyber attacks, said Kathleen Fisher, HACMS manager for DARPA. Continue reading »

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May 26

Cofounders, from left to right, Jason Stockman, Wei Sun, Andy Yen
Cofounders, from left to right, Jason Stockman, Wei Sun, Andy Yen.

- The Only Email System The NSA Can’t Access (Forbes, May 19, 2014):

When the NSA surveillance news broke last year it sent shockwaves through CERN, the particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. Andy Yen, a PhD student, took to the Young at CERN Facebook group with a simple message: “I am very concerned about the privacy issue, and I was wondering what I could do about it.”

There was a massive response, and of the 40 or so active in the discussion, six started meeting at CERN’s Restaurant Number 1, pooling their deep knowledge of computing and physics to found ProtonMail, a gmail-like email system which uses end-to-end encryption, making it impossible for outside parties to monitor.

Encrypted emails have actually been around since the 1980s, but they are extremely difficult to use. When Edward Snowden asked a reporter to use an end-to-end encrypted email to share details of the NSA surveillance program the reporter couldn’t get the system to work, says Yen. Continue reading »

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May 24

FYI.


Mind control cr Vets Today

- Mind Controlled Man Exposes Techno Hell (Before It’s News, May 23, 2014)

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May 23

- The Robots Are Coming, And They Are Replacing Warehouse Workers And Fast Food Employees (Economic Collapse, May 22, 2014):

There are already more than 101 million working age Americans that are not employed and 20 percent of the families in the entire country do not have a single member that has a job.  So what in the world are we going to do when robots start taking millions upon millions more of our jobs? Thanks to technology, the balance of power between employers and workers in this country is shifting dramatically in favor of the employers.  These days, many employers are wondering why they are dealing with so many human worker “headaches” when they can just use technology to get the same tasks done instead.  When you replace a human worker with a robot, you solve a whole bunch of problems.  Robots never take a day off, they never get tired, they never get sick, they never complain, they never show up late, they never waste time on the Internet and they always do what you tell them to do.  In addition, robotic technology has advanced to the point where it is actually cheaper to buy robots than it is to hire humans for a vast variety of different tasks.  From the standpoint of societal efficiency, this is a good thing.  But what happens when robots are able to do just about everything less expensively and more efficiently than humans can?  Where will our jobs come from?

And this is not something that is coming at some point in “the future”.

This is already happening. Continue reading »

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May 18

cell-phone-radiation-skull

rat-brain-cellphone-exposure


- Extensive cell phone use can triple brain cancer risk (Natural News, May 17, 2014):

Questions continue to arise about cell phones and their contribution to certain cancers. Even the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has raised some concern about extensive cell phone use. The NCI explains that cell phones emit radio frequency energy in the form of non-ionizing radiation. In other words, a cell phone basically lets off radio waves which are absorbed by the nearest tissues of the body. If a person carries a phone in their pocket all day long, energy can be absorbed into the person’s side and midsection.

How does this energy affect the cells over time?

Does this constant exposure disrupt cellular processes, especially when held up to the brain? Continue reading »

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May 15

- USAF Dismantling HAARP, Admits They Can Control Ionosphere (Video) (Before It’s News, May 15, 2014):

via ADN by Dermot Cole

The U.S. Air Force gave official notice to Congress Wednesday that it intends to dismantle the $300 million High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program in Gakona this summer.

The shutdown of HAARP, a project created by the late Sen. Ted Stevens when he wielded great control over the U.S. defense budget, will start after a final research experiment takes place in mid-June, the Air Force said in a letter to Congress Tuesday.

Responding to questions from Sen. Lisa Murkowski during a Senate hearing Wednesday, David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, said this is “not an area that we have any need for in the future” and it would not be a good use of Air Force research funds to keep HAARP going. “We’re moving on to other ways of managing the ionosphere, which the HAARP was really designed to do,” he said. “To inject energy into the ionosphere to be able to actually control it. But that work has been completed.”

Continue reading »

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May 14

- Now The Military Is Going To Build Robots That Have Morals (Defense One, May 13, 2014):

Are robots capable of moral or ethical reasoning? It’s no longer just a question for tenured philosophy professors or Hollywood directors. This week, it’s a question being put to the United Nations.

The Office of Naval Research will award $7.5 million in grant money over five years to university researchers from Tufts, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Brown, Yale and Georgetown to explore how to build a sense of right and wrong and moral consequence into autonomous robotic systems.

“Even though today’s unmanned systems are ‘dumb’ in comparison to a human counterpart, strides are being made quickly to incorporate more automation at a faster pace than we’ve seen before,” Paul Bello, director of the cognitive science program at the Office of Naval Research told Defense One. “For example, Google’s self-driving cars are legal and in-use in several states at this point. As researchers, we are playing catch-up trying to figure out the ethical and legal implications. We do not want to be caught similarly flat-footed in any kind of military domain where lives are at stake.”
Continue reading »

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May 11

rofl



Added: Oct 21, 2013

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May 10

FYI.


ut_diybrainstim_f

- Inside the Strange New World of DIY Brain Stimulation (Wired, May 5, 2014)

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