California Nuclear Plant Engineer: We were hit by explosion at Fukushima Unit 3 (MAP) — “The public started to freak out” — Tell colleagues what radioactive material is coming their way… don’t notify public — Don’t release initial data to officials until they’re ‘on board’

–  California Nuclear Plant Engineer: We were hit by explosion at Fukushima Unit 3 (MAP) — “The public started to freak out” — Tell colleagues what radioactive material is coming their way… don’t notify public — Don’t release initial data to officials until they’re ‘on board’ (ENENews, Sep 4, 2014):

Martin Wright, Radiation Protection Senior Engineer at Diablo Canyon nuclear plant (California) — Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP) Monitoring for Japan Nuclear Accident (pdf), 21st Annual RETS‐REMP Workshop (Hosted by NEI/Exelon Nuclear):

Presentation Excerpts

  • Politics and Public Hysteria >> The public started to freak out [about Fukushima] >> Anti-nukes fed the hysteria >> Reporters wanted to come watch our technicians perform milk sampling (we said no) PG&E did not want our picture linked with the Fukushima Event
  • Now the Big Question ????? How much did all this extra sampling cost? … about $40,000
  • DCPP most likely saw the U-3 explosion which occurred on March 14 at 1100 JST. From PG&E meteorologist Ed McCarthy: “The straight line distance from Fukushima to SLO is 5,066 miles. Assuming an average wind speed of 50 mph [and] some meandering and adding 24 hours, I’d estimate that the parcel of air that you observed [left] Japan between 3/13/2011 @1600 JST and 3/14/2011 @ 1600JST.”
  • Thoughts and Lessons Learned… >> Control initial data until EPA and State are onboard. Let the State notify the public and explain concentrations. Setup company PR contacts… >> Keep colleagues informed of what isotopes are coming their way

Interview with Martin Wright, DCPP radiation protection senior engineerQ: What was the most important lesson you learned from the Fukushima experience? A: When I started out in radiation protection years ago, it was all about protecting the public and the environment. This focus of responsibility has not changed. The Fukushima event has reemphasized that my role is vital to ensuring public confidence and public safety. The events in Japan were a stark reminder that each and every day, my family, friends, neighbors and people I have never met all depend on my team to keep them safe… Safety is our number one priority.

See also: Report: Fukushima nuclear waste will merge with radiation from U.S. reactors when washing up on West Coast — “Startling amounts” released from operating plants — Diablo Canyon officials admit to recently discharging more tritium than Fukushima (VIDEO)

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