Researchers Predict West Coast Killer Whales Will Exceed 1,000 Bq/Kg Of Radioactive Cesium – Over 50 Bq/Kg In Humans Leads To Irreversible Lesions In Vital Organs

Flashback:

Prof. Yury Bandazhevsky: Over 50 Bq/Kg In Humans Leads To Irreversible Lesions In Vital Organs – CRIMINAL WHO And IAEA EXPOSED (Video)

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killer-whales

Researchers predict west coast killer whales will exceed 1,000 Bq/kg of radioactive cesium — Over 10 times gov’t limit in Japan — Concern about harm to humans, sea life — Expert: People eating large amounts of fish may have levels similar to whales (ENENews, March 18, 2014):

Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Mar. 12, 2014: Ocean currents are driving those nuclear particles […] from Japan to our coastline, and more radiation is likely to be dumped into the ocean […] there is concern that the accumulation, especially of the long-lasting cesium-137, will eventually be harmful to sea life and us. […] certain models “suggest that in 30 years, Cesium 137 levels in (killer) whales will exceed the Canadian guideline of 1,000 becquerels per kilogram for consumption of seafood by humans — 10 times the Japanese guideline.” Scientists focus on whales because, like us, they are at the top of the food chain and eat a lot of fish. So, radiation levels in them is something like a “canary in a coal mine” for radiation pollution.

Canada.com, Mar. 12, 2014: Researchers developed a model based on the diet of fish-eating killer whales […] The models suggest that in 30 years, Cesium 137 levels in the whales will exceed the Canadian guideline of 1,000 becquerels per kilogram for consumption of seafood by humans – 10 times the Japanese guideline. […] [Juan Jose Alava of Simon Fraser University said,] “The Canadian government is the one that should be doing something, should be taking action to keep monitoring to see how these contaminants are behaving, what are the levels, and what is next.” […] While the additional impact of Cesium 137 is unknown, it may negatively affect the immune system or endocrine system, Alava said. “The impact on the animal needs to be studied. This is part of a cumulative impact on the marine environment.” The results raise concerns for aboriginal people who maintain a diet heavy in fish. “We might expect similar results because the diet of First Nation communities is based on seafood,” Alava said. “Humans at the top of the food web can perhaps see increasing levels in the future.”

See also: “Radioactive metal from Fukushima” detected in Pacific Northwest — Professor: “That was a surprise, it means there are still emissions … and trans-Pacific air pollution… It’s a concern to us, this is an international issue”

 

Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Mar. 12, 2014: Ocean currents are driving those nuclear particles […] from Japan to our coastline, and more radiation is likely to be dumped into the ocean […] there is concern that the accumulation, especially of the long-lasting cesium-137, will eventually be harmful to sea life and us. […] certain models “suggest that in 30 years, Cesium 137 levels in (killer) whales will exceed the Canadian guideline of 1,000 becquerels per kilogram for consumption of seafood by humans — 10 times the Japanese guideline.” Scientists focus on whales because, like us, they are at the top of the food chain and eat a lot of fish. So, radiation levels in them is something like a “canary in a coal mine” for radiation pollution.

Canada.com, Mar. 12, 2014: Researchers developed a model based on the diet of fish-eating killer whales […] The models suggest that in 30 years, Cesium 137 levels in the whales will exceed the Canadian guideline of 1,000 becquerels per kilogram for consumption of seafood by humans – 10 times the Japanese guideline. […] [Juan Jose Alava of Simon Fraser University said,] “The Canadian government is the one that should be doing something, should be taking action to keep monitoring to see how these contaminants are behaving, what are the levels, and what is next.” […] While the additional impact of Cesium 137 is unknown, it may negatively affect the immune system or endocrine system, Alava said. “The impact on the animal needs to be studied. This is part of a cumulative impact on the marine environment.” The results raise concerns for aboriginal people who maintain a diet heavy in fish. “We might expect similar results because the diet of First Nation communities is based on seafood,” Alava said. “Humans at the top of the food web can perhaps see increasing levels in the future.”

See also: “Radioactive metal from Fukushima” detected in Pacific Northwest — Professor: “That was a surprise, it means there are still emissions … and trans-Pacific air pollution… It’s a concern to us, this is an international issue”

2 thoughts on “Researchers Predict West Coast Killer Whales Will Exceed 1,000 Bq/Kg Of Radioactive Cesium – Over 50 Bq/Kg In Humans Leads To Irreversible Lesions In Vital Organs

  1. Eventually enter our food chain? It has already happened, they found plutonium in our milk in April of 2011, about a month after the 3/11/11 disaster at Fukushima began…..
    Yes, we are facing our own extinction. It won’t be in 20 or 30 years, either, it is happening as we read here.
    Denial and greed. Perhaps those are the qualities that caused the collapse and vanishing of other great empires……we don’t know, but man doesn’t change much.
    We are facing our own extinction. All the denial in the world won’t change it. Only man is stupid enough to build technology he cannot control, and put a life ending technology in charge of the modern world.
    We are joining the 98% of the species who have lived and been rendered extinct on this planet…..the planet will go on without us.

  2. On the same subject……the vanishing of civilizations…….there is another aspect you might find interesting. As a historian, I have often pondered what happened to the knowledge that built the pyramids, developed plastic and aspirin over 10,000 years ago.
    Looks like we have a similar problem with all this digital storing of data, and literature……called bit rot.
    Read this, it is worth knowing about, and another argument for keeping books in print, not in electronic data bases.
    http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/3/18/bit-rot-the-internetneverforgetsaordoesit.html

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