EFSF Denies It Is An Illegal Pyramid Scheme – The Euro Is Dead

EFSF Denies It Is An Illegal Pyramid Scheme (ZeroHedge, Nov. 13, 2011):

If there is one thing one can say about the insolvent European continent is that despite everything, it is a bastion of truth, and a knight of see-thru disclosure. After all, who can forget such brutally honest statements as “Greece will not default“, or the follow ups: “Ireland is not Greece”, “Portugal is not Ireland”, “Spain is not Portugal”, “Italy is fine”, “Italy has turned down money from the IMF“, “The IMF has never offered any money to Italy“, and then the old standbys, “the ECB will not be a lender of last resort”, “the EFSF will use 4-5x leverage“, wait, make that “the EFSF will use 3-4x leverage“, and last but not least, “Europe is not America” and “it is all the fault of evil CDS speculators.” Well we have one more to add to the list: “the EFSF is not an illegal ponzi scheme” – because after the mindboggling report in the Telegraph yesterday that the EFSF has bought hundreds of millions of its own bonds, exposing the scam in the heart of the Eurozone for anyone to see, the European rescuer of last resort (at least until the ECB comes out monetizing and Eurobonds are issued)has no choice but to join in the parade of truths and as Reuters reports “said on Sunday that it did not buy its own bonds last week, denying a British newspaper report that it spent more than 100 million euros ($137 million) to cover a shortfall of demand. “The EFSF did not buy its own bonds and the book was 3 billion euros,” an EFSF spokesman said, referring to the 3 billion euros raised in last Monday’s 10-year bond issue.” We are certain that in order to dispel rumors about its fraud-i-ness, the EFSF will promptly submit a full breakdown of the entities that received bond allocations (we know that Japan is good for €300 million, that China is good for €0.0, and that as Merkel said one week ago, “hardly any countries in G20 have said they will participate in the EFSF.So, because we believe everything that comes out of Europe, we are patiently waiting to see just who it was that bought EFSF bonds when nobody else did. And yet what is most troubling to us, is that it took the world 5 minutes to completely agree that the EFSF is a ponzi scheme, with nobody doubting this supposedly “refuted” disclosure for even a second. Perhaps that tells you more about the current state of Europe than anything else…

– Full article here:  The Euro Is Dead (ZeroHedge, Nov. 13, 2011):

The ‘tragedy of the commons’ or ‘free-rider’ dilemma of game theoretical cocktail parties is a great framework for considering the current tug-of-war between individual sovereign fiscal actions among the European Union and the over-arching monetary policy of the ECB. If the ECB is dovish and too many states decide to suckle on the teat of liquidity – as opposed to fiscally ‘behave’ – then everyone loses (as we see currently evolving). The lack of any Nash (stable and dominant) equilibrium among the European nations and their hoped-for benefactor is becoming increasingly problematic for both trading and business investment.

Nomura’s Global Macro Strategy group tackle the problem that is now abundantly clear the euro area as currently constructed is not stable and so it will have to change (hence, the Euro is dead!). The direction of travel is being set out by northern European politicians and is worth noting – more Union not less. But two points are critical to note; first that the new euro area may be so different from the one the current members signed up to as to make a process of voluntary re-application for euro stage II necessary to determine future membership, and second that any new variable geometry euro will take a long period of time to set up. How then to cover the intervening period?

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