US Treasury Adds Another $20 Billion In Debt Overnight! – Just $160 Billion Below Revised Debt Ceiling!

What can you say?


Treasury Adds Another $20 Billion In Debt Overnight, Just $160 Billion Below Revised Ceiling (ZeroHedge, Aug 8, 2011):

Ok, someone please explain this one to us because we must be a little slow. Wasn’t the whole thing with the debt ceiling hike such that no more Congressional melodramas would have to be inflicted upon the population until after Obama [won|lost] the 2012 elections? Because according to the one again exponentially increasing debt balance of the US Treasury (there is another $51 billion in debt/cash coming in next week), the total US treasury balance (subject to the ceiling) is $14.54 trillion (and $14.58 trillion for total), an increase of $20 billion overnight, the Treasury will hit its latest ceiling no later than the end of September. As the latest DTS statement indicates, the debt ceiling now is $14.694 trillion: a number which Tim Geithner will hit in about a month. So if this is due to a planned expansion as part of the two step plan, we would like to understand how it works, because the $400 billion additional ceiling is barely sufficient to cover the catch up in funding for the SSN and the various governmental trust funds. And the far bigger concern is that tax receipts are about to plunge courtesy of the imminent double dip. So we wonder just based on what assumptions does the Treasury believe that its issuance needs will be met by this paltry debt ceiling.

2 thoughts on “US Treasury Adds Another $20 Billion In Debt Overnight! – Just $160 Billion Below Revised Debt Ceiling!

  1. Monday, the global markets fell sharply as people around the world started pulling their money out. In the USA, 620+ on the Dow, all sales, no purchases. Volume, usually around 750 million a day during August, exceeded 2 billion.
    Tuesday, the FED intervened and started buying US treasuries. Although the markets around the world were reviving, fears about France began to concern investors.
    Wednesday, the world markets tumbled again as the crisis continues to spread. Over 2 billion shares traded on the DOW yesterday, all were sales. This is the beginning of a run on the banks.
    Today, the FED is at it again, buying more and running up the debt as you describe, but the world markets are imploding, and the FED cannot put it’s band aid on the entire world. We are no longer the world’s largest economy, we have been gutted by the banks and wall street.
    The entire global economy is in meltdown.

  2. According to Zero Hedge, countries outside of the U.S. dumped 74 billion dollars in U.S. Treasuries, most of it over the weekend:

    “Over the weekend, we observed the perplexing sell off of $56 billion in US Treasurys courtesy of weekly disclosure in the Fed’s custodial account (source: H.4.1) and speculated if this may be due to an asset rotation, under duress or otherwise, out of bonds and into stocks, to prevent the collapse of the global ponzi (because when the BRICs tell the IMF to boost its bailout capacity you know it is global). We also proposed a far simpler theory: “the dreaded D-day in which foreign official and private investors finally start offloading their $2.7 trillion in Treasurys with impunity (although not with the element of surprise – China has made it abundantly clear it will sell its Treasury holdings, the only question is when), has finally arrived.” In hindsight the Occam’s Razor should have been applied. Little did we know 5 short days ago just how violent the reaction by China would be (both post and pre-facto) to the Senate decision to propose a law for all out trade warfare with China. Now we know – in the week ended October 12, a further $17.7 billion was “removed” from the Fed’s custodial Treasury account, meaning that someone, somewhere is very displeased with US paper, and, far more importantly, what it represents, and wants to make their displeasure heard loud and clear. (Source)

    Undoubtedly, the Chinese and other countries have recently discovered that Italy and Greece, with smaller debt to income ratios than the United States, are less riskier and carry a higher rate of return. This is because, unlike the US, the Rothschild/Rockefeller bond rating agencies have trashed their country’s debt ratings, forcing them to pay a much higher interest rate than U.S. Treasuries. Hey, if you take the risk, you might as well earn the reward!

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