US Government Admits Radiation Found In Milk from Washington State

And there is a lot more to come:

“Nuclear radiation is forever,” she added. It doesn’t dissipate or disappear. Jeff Patterson, former Physicians for Social Responsibility president said, “There is no safe level of radionuclide exposure, whether from food, water or other sources. Period.” In 1953, Nobel laureate George Wald agreed saying “no amount of radiation is safe. Every dose is an overdose.”

“Radioactive iodine releases from Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi reactors may exceed those of Three Mile Island by over 100,000 times….While Chernobyl had one source of radioactivity, its reactor, there are seven leaking radiation sources at the Japanese site. Together, the three damaged reactors and four spent fuel pools at Fukushima Daiicho contain (much) more long-lived radioactivity, notably cesium-137, than the Chernobyl reactor.”

“The radioactive (iodine-131) fallout is now as much as 73 percent of the daily radiation emitted from Chernobyl following its meltdown disaster.” For cesium-137, it’s 60%.

“I hate to say it, but I am pessimistic….We have to think of all six (reactors) going down, and the possibility of that happening is not low.”
Updating Japan’s Nuclear Disaster

The US like now the EU has raised radiation limits for food:

EU Erhöht Grenzwerte Drastisch! EU Raises ‘Safe Level’ of Cesium in Japanese Food By 20 Times!

EU Drastically Raises Radiation Limits For Food! – EU Erhöht Drastisch Die Strahlungs-Grenzwerte Für Lebensmittel!

And those criminals will continue to play that game if necessary. All is well no need to prepare, which is exactly what the people in Japan were told before.

That recommendation says it all:

International Commission Recommends Japan Temporarily Increase Radiation Limits For Public

Raw milk is poison, whereas irradiated milk is safe!


Radiation Traces Found in U.S. Milk

(Wall Street Journal) –The U.S. government said Wednesday that traces of radiation have been found in milk in Washington state, but said the amounts are far too low to trigger any public-health concern.

The Environmental Protection Agency said a March 25 sample of milk produced in the Spokane, Wash., area contained a 0.8 pico curies per literlevel of iodine-131, which it said was less than one five-thousandth of the safety safety guideline set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The EPA said it increased monitoring after radiation leaked from Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. It expects more such findings in coming days, but in amounts “far below levels of public-health concern, including for infants and children.”

Iodine-131 has a half-life of about eight days, meaning levels should fade quickly. “These findings are a minuscule amount compared to what people experience every day,” the agency said.

For example, a person would be exposed to low levels of radiation on a round trip cross country flight, watching television, and even from construction materials,” Patricia Hansen, an FDA senior scientist, said in a written statement distributed by the EPA late Wednesday.

The FDA last week said it will block imports of Japanese milk products and certain other foods produced in the area around the Fukushima nuclear facility because of concerns about radiation contamination.

An EPA spokesman said that while the agency isn’t certain that the iodine-131 found in the sampled milk came from Fukushima, its discovery is “consistent with” what the agency knows has been released so far from the damaged nuclear reactors there.

“We know we don’t normally see iodine-131 in milk. We know there’s been an incident where it’s been released,” the spokesman said. “And now we’re seeing it.”

Dairy industry officials stressed that products remained safe.

“Consumer safety is the highest priority for dairy farmers and dairy foods companies, and today’s report by EPA and FDA confirms that our nation’s dairy products continue to be safe to eat and drink,” said Rob Vandenheuvel, general manager of the Ontario, Calif.-based Milk Producers Council, which represents dairies in Southern and Central California. “We recognize the concerns of our consumers, and the U.S. dairy industry will continue to work closely with federal and state government agencies to ensure that we maintain a safe milk supply.”

ASIA NEWS
MARCH 31, 2011

Source: The Wall Street Journal