British Government: Illegal Downloaders May Lose Web Access

Commentary by Max Keiser:

Britain is Appeasing the Copyright Cartel Again

Britain is completely on the wrong side of this issue. Copyrights are the public’s rights to help manage the public’s intellectual property. A limited period of time, like 28 years (per the original Constitutional statute), giving individuals monopoly rights over intellectual property is the outer most boundary of time that a society invested in the speech rights and intellectual rights of its people would allow in good conscience. Britain, and it is easy to understand, given the massive cock ups of this Labor government, is allowing themselves to be steered by the copyright cartel just like they allow themselves to be strong armed by the banking, pharmaceutical, and defense industries. This Labor government has abdicated its role as a representative of the People and their position on Copyright is yet another glaring example of their conflicted, misguided policies.

Posted: August 25, 2009
Source: Huffington Post


illegal-download

LONDON — The British government says people who illegally download music and films could have their Internet connections cut off.

Treasury Minister Stephen Timms says the move would allow “swifter and more flexible measures” to clamp down on piracy.

The plans announced Tuesday include blocking access to download sites and temporarily suspending users’ internet accounts.

The announcement drew criticism from some groups, but those representing the music industry were pleased.

The Open Rights Group — which aims to raise awareness of digital rights — said any suspension would “restrict people’s fundamental right to freedom of expression.”

But the British Phonographic Industry called it helpful in the fight against piracy.

August 25, 2009

Source: AP

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